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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Colorado
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shogunater View Post
    Gentlemen--I understand how a knife works. I'm asking about actual documented combative systems that make knife work more efficient.
    Here's the Navy Seal system.

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  2. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
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    6,239
    Quote Originally Posted by Hasher View Post
    ~~~whiney voice~~~

    ”But Brent that is not a system. Must have system!!!”
    :)

    I find that a lot of systems are nothing more than marketing.

    But I CAN understand some one wanting to know that what they are training has legitimacy.

    People have been stabbing each other since we first learned how to sharpen a rock, so there isn’t a lot to poking holes in flesh.

    Good training will give you more options on how to do so (e.g. striking methods perhaps one wasn’t aware of) and provide a training template for how to become faster and more efficient. And better marksmanship is always a good thing.

    I will say that exposure to different systems is a good thing. I don’t buy into the efficacy of the biomechanical cutting methodology, but that doesn’t mean there’s no value in the practice or drills with partners. Striking the target that is available to you is sometimes the best you can do.

    I don’t teach any particular knife system, but I have trained many different formal and informal systems. I have never stuck with anything that I didn’t consider valuable for real situations. And virtually everything I have done has degrees of applicability to knife, even if they are “only” empty-handed systems.

    The premise of Karate for example is pretty simple - hit the other bastard hard and repeatedly until it stops moving. How that’s done may or may not be sophisticated, but the premise is simple.
    Brent Yamamoto
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  3. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    460
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    Proactive knife use is easy. Surreptitiously access the weapon and stab hard and fast. You really donít NEED training...though there are some helpful things to know and practice.

    Reactive use is more tricky. AGAINST a knife, it is all about moving, getting away as best you can, and drawing a pistol. This is no time to get in a knife duel, much less hands vs knife.

    Reactive use WITH a knife is all about accessing it quickly and successfully deploying it. This is why folders are of limited value in so many circumstances (which is not a recommendation against carrying one, just a realization of its limitations). Fixed blades are better in every way, the only exception is that they are not as convenient.

    Using the knife once it is out is no big trick (though it is a good thing to know more than just being a sewing machine). The trick is getting it out in the first place.


    This is why, for reactive use, the sheath and the handle are more important than the blade.
    And that's what I'm asking for, beyond the sewing machine, and I gratefully await updates on the footage from you.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    8,303
    I think when a lot of people think of a knife fight they think of something like the knife fight in Under Siege or all the fights in The Hunted. This day and age I just don't see it. The United States martial arts are gun fighting. The knife has a places in getting people off of you or in taking people down by surprise and a lot of the time with the intention of doing it silently. In that context knowing where to target and the best way to do things like the classic sentry take down.
    Geek Warlord
    Dungeons & Dragons & Deadlifts

    Muscle Wizard Casts: Fist


    CRG-1 DPS
    CRG-2 CRG x 2
    SGF-1 Shotgun Gunfighting
    Trauma care under fire
    Spetsnaz Sniper
    HRO-5 Terrorist & Active Shooter Interdiction
    HRO-6 CQB: Fighting in Structures
    CRG-4 Force on Force
    HRO-5 Terrorist & Active Shooter Interdiction - 3 day
    TWOTU edition
    Trauma Medicine for the CCW Operator
    Pistol Ground Fighting (Taint Shooting Progressions)

    TWOTU since May 2015

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    460
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    :)

    I find that a lot of systems are nothing more than marketing.

    But I CAN understand some one wanting to know that what they are training has legitimacy.

    People have been stabbing each other since we first learned how to sharpen a rock, so there isn’t a lot to poking holes in flesh.

    Good training will give you more options on how to do so (e.g. striking methods perhaps one wasn’t aware of) and provide a training template for how to become faster and more efficient. And better marksmanship is always a good thing.

    I will say that exposure to different systems is a good thing. I don’t buy into the efficacy of the biomechanical cutting methodology, but that doesn’t mean there’s no value in the practice or drills with partners. Striking the target that is available to you is sometimes the best you can do.

    I don’t teach any particular knife system, but I have trained many different formal and informal systems. I have never stuck with anything that I didn’t consider valuable for real situations. And virtually everything I have done has degrees of applicability to knife, even if they are “only” empty-handed systems.

    The premise of Karate for example is pretty simple - hit the other bastard hard and repeatedly until it stops moving. How that’s done may or may not be sophisticated, but the premise is simple.
    How you use an edged weapon is obvious. Fluid movement for hitting different areas is slightly less straightforward. For example, until I started studying Libre, I didn't know about the methodology of hooking in the reverse grip, and the different combinations you can use for getting around a threat depending whether you're going through them, pushing them back, etc.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    460
    Quote Originally Posted by Dorkface View Post
    Here's the Navy Seal system.

    That was rather inefficient in fluidity of movement compared to the Israeli dude. It felt a bit like he was showing off for the camera.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,877
    I’m going to start studying Nacho Libre.
    I carry two kinds of trauma kits. One for fixing it and one for causing it.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    1,260
    How about the ancient art of Ching Ching Pow?

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    460
    Quote Originally Posted by Hasher View Post
    Iím going to start studying Nacho Libre.
    It sounds like you've never heard of Scott Barb, shame.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    47,379
    You guys notice how I simply stay totally out of some discussions these days?
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

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