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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,595
    Quote Originally Posted by reforger2002 View Post
    I have used full metal airsoft analogs for years as part of draw from holster training in CCW classes a few thoughts

    1. don't reuse bb - they're dirt cheap and the dirt and stuff from reused pellets makes life a pain in the ass
    2. the propane ones get a little sketchy when using them in a cold garage / pole shed
    3. six students blasting away in a basement will quickly raise gas levels
    4. good air tool oil like Marvel will go a long way to keeping these things running
    5. do not do high speed low drag emergency reloads with the mag being dropped to the concrete floor
    6. if you're making a big back stops either bed sheets hung at the top and loose at the bottom or cloth painters tarps work better than the poly tarps, for some reason those plastic bb's go right through poly tarps
    7. EYE PROTECTION - wrap around eye protection. Those little round bastard bbs ricochet like you wouldn't believe
    Agreed on all of the above. I didn't want to get into the weeds any further than I already had, but air tool oil is definitely important to add when filling mags. The seals and o rings inside need it. I use grease on slide rails and air tool oil in the hop up unit and in mags.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    In all and complete honesty, IMHO based on an adult life spent developing combat skills with firearms and teaching for 25 years, I will submit that one could get even more benefit with a judicious and aggressive dry fire routine. I too have had little training time in the last year, but I've changed instead to additional dry practice work. Yes...its boring, yes it lacks the bells and whistles of lasers and lights and all of those things our modern ADHD minds seem to require to maintain attention, but 30 minutes of dry work daily will do far more than three hours per week of live fire.

    Set aside 30 min

    Present to point with trigger break from ready 100 times
    Present to point with trigger break from holster 200-500 times
    Proactive reload 25 times
    Reactive Clearing Process 25 times
    Supplement with Diagonal Lines, Watch Your Back, and Changing Levels as many times as you have time for

    That is what I do guys. YMMV depending on your attention span and ability to focus in a quiet room in the wee hours
    Thanks Gabe. I am admittedly a bit enamored with this thing - it's downright fun to shoot - but I don't mean to exaggerate its role or minimize the role of other forms of practice.

    Another of my goals is to get up earlier to allow for more time for working out, practice, and / or reading. This looks like a good template for dry practice moving forward.

    You do this every morning after working out?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    8,385
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    In all and complete honesty, IMHO based on an adult life spent developing combat skills with firearms and teaching for 25 years, I will submit that one could get even more benefit with a judicious and aggressive dry fire routine. I too have had little training time in the last year, but I've changed instead to additional dry practice work. Yes...its boring, yes it lacks the bells and whistles of lasers and lights and all of those things our modern ADHD minds seem to require to maintain attention, but 30 minutes of dry work daily will do far more than three hours per week of live fire.

    Set aside 30 min

    Present to point with trigger break from ready 100 times
    Present to point with trigger break from holster 200-500 times
    Proactive reload 25 times
    Reactive Clearing Process 25 times
    Supplement with Diagonal Lines, Watch Your Back, and Changing Levels as many times as you have time for

    That is what I do guys. YMMV depending on your attention span and ability to focus in a quiet room in the wee hours
    Too simple to be tactical.

    dry work is 99.9% of my time anymore. It works. Perfect the basics and all else will follow.
    Geek Warlord
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  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    47,546
    Quote Originally Posted by apamburn View Post
    Agreed on all of the above. I didn't want to get into the weeds any further than I already had, but air tool oil is definitely important to add when filling mags. The seals and o rings inside need it. I use grease on slide rails and air tool oil in the hop up unit and in mags.



    Thanks Gabe. I am admittedly a bit enamored with this thing - it's downright fun to shoot - but I don't mean to exaggerate its role or minimize the role of other forms of practice.

    Another of my goals is to get up earlier to allow for more time for working out, practice, and / or reading. This looks like a good template for dry practice moving forward.

    You do this every morning after working out?
    Not a morning guy anymore, but I do spend my afternoons in the training room. Dry work is usually a prelude to lifting
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    6,347
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    In all and complete honesty, IMHO based on an adult life spent developing combat skills with firearms and teaching for 25 years, I will submit that one could get even more benefit with a judicious and aggressive dry fire routine. I too have had little training time in the last year, but I've changed instead to additional dry practice work. Yes...its boring, yes it lacks the bells and whistles of lasers and lights and all of those things our modern ADHD minds seem to require to maintain attention, but 30 minutes of dry work daily will do far more than three hours per week of live fire.

    Set aside 30 min

    Present to point with trigger break from ready 100 times
    Present to point with trigger break from holster 200-500 times
    Proactive reload 25 times
    Reactive Clearing Process 25 times
    Supplement with Diagonal Lines, Watch Your Back, and Changing Levels as many times as you have time for

    That is what I do guys. YMMV depending on your attention span and ability to focus in a quiet room in the wee hours

    Agreed on all counts.

    Most people need to spend more time in the home gym than at the range. And way more time doing dry work than throwing ammo away.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

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  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    Most people need to spend more time in the home gym than at the range.
    Am I the only one who does dryfire/airsoft/blue gun drills/pistol kata in between sets in the home gym?

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    North Alabama
    Posts
    132
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunstore Commando View Post
    Am I the only one who does dryfire/airsoft/blue gun drills/pistol kata in between sets in the home gym?
    I do dry fire work between sets occasionally. Getting a decent draw and sight picture after a heavy set of squats can be a study in true concentration.
    Inter Arma Enim Silent Leges

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Scottsdale, AZ
    Posts
    215
    I also do much of my dry work in-between my my heavier sets, and I utilize a rifle or shotgun in there every once in awhile too. I get consistent practice every week. I have a specific mobility routine for my warm-up, so I will do some firearm Kata work after my weight lifting session to get my movement work.
    Don Marbach
    Scottsdale, AZ

    "Man's flight through life is sustained by the power of his knowledge"

    Austin 'Dusty' Miller, the quote on the Eagle & Fledgling statue at the U.S. Air Force Academy

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    AR15ONA
    Posts
    401
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunstore Commando View Post
    Am I the only one who does dryfire/airsoft/blue gun drills/pistol kata in between sets in the home gym?

    Nope, got a collection of weighted blue guns.


    I do dryfire as well but considering adding airsoft into the mix. Anyone here tried the Glock branded GBB pistols?

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,595
    Quote Originally Posted by Oscar01 View Post
    Nope, got a collection of weighted blue guns.


    I do dryfire as well but considering adding airsoft into the mix. Anyone here tried the Glock branded GBB pistols?
    That's kind of what this thread is about. I don't know if Glock authorizes or endorses some, or who manufactures them if they do.

    But the WE branded pistol has been pretty satisfactory.

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