Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    6,239

    Default Fluidity of Movement

    I post this in the Mind Dojo thread because, although the topic is physical movement, it has more to do with how one thinks and organizes his training. And ultimately all physical skills must be coordinated with the mind; obviously the mind initiates everything we do, but that is merely the beginning. The difference between the trained and the untrained is how well we can coordinate our mind and body...and this applies equally to weapons as the empty hand.

    How does one develop fluidity of movement? The simple answer is just to do it a lot.

    Of course, that takes some knowledge of what to do - it's hard to practice when you don't know what to do, and it is sometimes counter productive practicing shitty things. (Though if in doubt, it is better to do SOMETHING...ANYTHING...than doing nothing. Any physical practice that improves dexterity, mobility, speed, strength, balance, etc. is going to benefit you in multiple ways.)

    Fluid movement is efficient. There's no extra or unnecessary movement, no extra wind up on a punch or a telegraphing turn of the foot before a kick. We all know that the shortest route between two points is a straight line...yet so many people forget to apply this idea to their own movement (maybe they think they do, but the reality is often different).

    Take whatever movement you want - drawing a pistol, throwing a punch or a knife stab (or better yet a sequence of them), getting off the X - practice it to your best ability, film yourself, and review it in slow motion. Look for unnecessary deviations from the path. Are you telegraphing? Do you wind up for your punch? Do you overswing on a cut or stab? Do you shift your weight to the left before initiating a takeoff to the right? Be critical and look for mistakes and areas for improvement.

    DO NOT FUCKING LOOK FOR VALIDATION THAT YOU'RE DOING THINGS PERFECTLY. Because you're not. Even if you do things really, really well, there is room for improvement. If there's one thing I can claim, it's a certain amount of skill with fluidity of motion. And if I have things I think I should do better, so do you. Find one thing you can improve and then FIX IT. Once you fix that, move on to fix something else.

    This brings us to "slow is smooth, smooth is fast". I hate that phrase...because slow is just slow. Smooth is just smooth, and fast is just fast. I know people who are smooth as butter but relatively slow, and people that are herky jerky as hell but are damn fast.

    But to be fair, we know what that phrase means. All things being equal, being smooth can help us move faster...and it is certainly related to fluidity of movement.

    So...

    Practice slowly and PERFECTLY. Emphasis on perfect. Use a mirror, use film. Make sure it's perfect and do it a lot. Want a simple barometer of how well you're doing? Ask yourself if you look cool. Looking cool isn't everything (there's a lot of cool stuff that is shit), but if it looks cool it's usually at least fluid and smooth.

    Practice FAST, as fast as you can possibly move, even to the point you screw up your form. Slow it down again to make it perfect, and go fast again. Push your limits. Film it.

    A note on perfect practice - we have all heard that "Practice doesn't make perfect, PERFECT PRACTICE makes perfect." Yeah, this is true, but it's also often an excuse for lazy people to not practice. You're not going to get anything perfect when you are first learning something, so just do the best you can. Perfection will come.

    Rinse repeat.

    There are no secrets. There may be fundamentals you are unaware of, so always seek out fundamentals.

    I get exasperated on this subject sometimes. A great example is the pistol kata template videos that Gabe, Ted and I did awhile back. Years of practice, research, success in actual gunfights, pressure testing in training, countless classes...all distilled into a few simple exercises and available on streaming video for only a few dollars. Obviously it applies to pistol, but it can be applied to rifle/shotgun, can be extrapolated to empty hand and knife...it is multiple lifetimes of combat knowledge presented as simply and concisely as possible. If you are a fan of this forum and interested in maximizing your capability (and specifically looking for fluidity of movement), we have done the research for you. Doing the work is up to you.

    The only real secret to success in any endeavor (and it's not really a secret...it's simply a hard truth people want to ignore) - it's a lot of hard work. Always be looking for more knowledge, but don't let that stop you from doing the work.

    Want fluid movement? DO THE WORK.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    2,796
    "DO THE WORK" is the key thing. So many are unwilling to strive for that self-perfection path. It is not easy and requires effort, lots of effort. 'Effort' is required to separate wheat from chaff, it is as simple as that. When I was fencing, I spent hours daily outside of class time to quickly achieve excellence. So it is with any martial endeavor; if something is meaningful, do the work. Or not.
    "When one goes willingly into the darkness, all he will find there, is what he brought in with him".

    --Gabe Suarez, after the 7-11 shootout

    Proper development of the 'Warrior Spirit', training and physical conditioning before 'The Event' cannot be overstated.

    U.S. Army Rangers (1/75 'Old Scroll')
    CRG; 0-5 Feet CRG; PSP Pistol; FOF Instructor School; Combat Pistol Instructor School

  3. #3
    Brent has a way with always hitting on timeless, relevant topics and does so with diplomacy.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    6,239
    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanNobody View Post
    Brent has a way with always hitting on timeless, relevant topics and does so with diplomacy.
    To the extent one can be diplomatic using an F-bomb...

    But I will take it. Thank you
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Tucson via Detroit
    Posts
    591
    Simply posting because I can’t rep this post. Even if I could, I couldn’t rep it enough. Hopefully this year will allows us the opportunity to share a range again.
    The biggest hindrance to adaptability is ego.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    4,620
    Well I can:

    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    I post this in the Mind Dojo thread because, although the topic is physical movement, it has more to do with how one thinks and organizes his training. And ultimately all physical skills must be coordinated with the mind; obviously the mind initiates everything we do, but that is merely the beginning. The difference between the trained and the untrained is how well we can coordinate our mind and body...and this applies equally to weapons as the empty hand.

    How does one develop fluidity of movement? The simple answer is just to do it a lot.

    Of course, that takes some knowledge of what to do - it's hard to practice when you don't know what to do, and it is sometimes counter productive practicing shitty things. (Though if in doubt, it is better to do SOMETHING...ANYTHING...than doing nothing. Any physical practice that improves dexterity, mobility, speed, strength, balance, etc. is going to benefit you in multiple ways.)

    Fluid movement is efficient. There's no extra or unnecessary movement, no extra wind up on a punch or a telegraphing turn of the foot before a kick. We all know that the shortest route between two points is a straight line...yet so many people forget to apply this idea to their own movement (maybe they think they do, but the reality is often different).

    Take whatever movement you want - drawing a pistol, throwing a punch or a knife stab (or better yet a sequence of them), getting off the X - practice it to your best ability, film yourself, and review it in slow motion. Look for unnecessary deviations from the path. Are you telegraphing? Do you wind up for your punch? Do you overswing on a cut or stab? Do you shift your weight to the left before initiating a takeoff to the right? Be critical and look for mistakes and areas for improvement.

    DO NOT FUCKING LOOK FOR VALIDATION THAT YOU'RE DOING THINGS PERFECTLY. Because you're not. Even if you do things really, really well, there is room for improvement. If there's one thing I can claim, it's a certain amount of skill with fluidity of motion. And if I have things I think I should do better, so do you. Find one thing you can improve and then FIX IT. Once you fix that, move on to fix something else.

    This brings us to "slow is smooth, smooth is fast". I hate that phrase...because slow is just slow. Smooth is just smooth, and fast is just fast. I know people who are smooth as butter but relatively slow, and people that are herky jerky as hell but are damn fast.

    But to be fair, we know what that phrase means. All things being equal, being smooth can help us move faster...and it is certainly related to fluidity of movement.

    So...

    Practice slowly and PERFECTLY. Emphasis on perfect. Use a mirror, use film. Make sure it's perfect and do it a lot. Want a simple barometer of how well you're doing? Ask yourself if you look cool. Looking cool isn't everything (there's a lot of cool stuff that is shit), but if it looks cool it's usually at least fluid and smooth.

    Practice FAST, as fast as you can possibly move, even to the point you screw up your form. Slow it down again to make it perfect, and go fast again. Push your limits. Film it.

    A note on perfect practice - we have all heard that "Practice doesn't make perfect, PERFECT PRACTICE makes perfect." Yeah, this is true, but it's also often an excuse for lazy people to not practice. You're not going to get anything perfect when you are first learning something, so just do the best you can. Perfection will come.

    Rinse repeat.

    There are no secrets. There may be fundamentals you are unaware of, so always seek out fundamentals.

    I get exasperated on this subject sometimes. A great example is the pistol kata template videos that Gabe, Ted and I did awhile back. Years of practice, research, success in actual gunfights, pressure testing in training, countless classes...all distilled into a few simple exercises and available on streaming video for only a few dollars. Obviously it applies to pistol, but it can be applied to rifle/shotgun, can be extrapolated to empty hand and knife...it is multiple lifetimes of combat knowledge presented as simply and concisely as possible. If you are a fan of this forum and interested in maximizing your capability (and specifically looking for fluidity of movement), we have done the research for you. Doing the work is up to you.

    The only real secret to success in any endeavor (and it's not really a secret...it's simply a hard truth people want to ignore) - it's a lot of hard work. Always be looking for more knowledge, but don't let that stop you from doing the work.

    Want fluid movement? DO THE WORK.
    Thanks, Brent!
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I rode the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer (as modified)

    "What cannot be remedied must be endured."

    Vale et omnia quae.

    P:20

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •