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View Full Version : What about the F.I.G.H.T. system??



patrick88
08-20-2004, 10:10 PM
Anybody have any comments on this fighting style? From what I read it is like Krav Maga. How is Krav? Thanks

kildak
08-21-2004, 12:09 AM
Anybody have any comments on this fighting style? From what I read it is like Krav Maga. How is Krav? Thanks

I'm currently a student of both the FIGHT system and of Krav. FIGHT is actually the unarmed H2H element of the Haganah system, which includes knife, pistol and ground survival.

The FIGHT system is a merger of the two Israeli martial arts, Krav Maga and Hisardut. Mike Kanarek, the creator of Haganah and a former Israeli special forces operator, combined two more combative elements to the FIGHT system, KAPAP and LOTAR, which are taught to the Israeli military.

The FIGHT system is simple to learn as most of movements are very natural and the complete system is taught in a 17 week cycle. Mr. Kanarek also authored a manual and several DVD's to support the system.

I've been involved in martial arts and combatives for about 20 years now, the FIGHT is by far the most complete and easily learned fighting system I've been involved with.

My greatest concern with the FIGHT system is that is weak on the improvisional freestyle elements, at least as it is taught in my school. It's not a huge issue if you've had previous training, but it could potentially cause problems for the inexperienced.

Charles Rives
08-21-2004, 01:52 AM
I've practiced FIGHT for a little over a year and really like it too. I have several years of experience in other traditional martial arts and a little experience with Krav Maga and feel like FIGHT does a good job of pulling some of the best aspects from many of those.

One part of the FIGHT system that I really like is fact taht doesn't have very many components or separate skills. Kanarek applies a relatively small number of simple techniques to a wide variety of attacks and situations. This makes the learning process quick. The techniques are simple, and no-flash.

Like Kildak said, the basic curriculum is written around a sixteen week rotation at 2-hr per week. After the first rotation, you'll be familiar with the basic concepts. By the fourth rotation, you have done enough repitition to integrate the system into your brain pretty well.

If you have a class nearby or even just get together with a partner to train the techniques, the book and videos make learning the system pretty easy. Even after several rotations, I try to always review the techniques on the video (for that week's stuff) a few minutes before and after practicing.

You can find more info at Karanek's web-site (http://www.fight2survive.com/).

Chuck

patrick88
08-21-2004, 10:23 AM
Thanks for the responses. I was looking at getting the DVD from the website. Is it something that a partner and I can practice at home? There aren't any training facilities where I live. What do you mean by improvisional freestyle elements? I used to box for my ship when I was in the Navy so I have fighting experience. Do I need any special training equipment like rubber knives or fake gun? Thanks again

kildak
08-21-2004, 11:21 AM
Thanks for the responses. I was looking at getting the DVD from the website. Is it something that a partner and I can practice at home? There aren't any training facilities where I live. What do you mean by improvisional freestyle elements? I used to box for my ship when I was in the Navy so I have fighting experience. Do I need any special training equipment like rubber knives or fake gun? Thanks again

The DVD's and manual cover everything that you need to practice at home with a partner. I believe that Mr. Kanarek requires that all student's who take lessons with a certified FIGHT instuctor/school obtain both the DVD's and manual. My school teaches the FIGHT system exactly in the order it progresses on the DVD's. (Some may consider the DVD/manual requirement an unnecessary marketing gimmick, however there have been several instances where I have picked up additional technique specifics which I was not shown or missed during my classes.)

As for my reference to freestyle elements, every class begins with a set of basics, i.e puches, strikes, kicks and the engagement drill. The rest of the class generally covers the combative to be learned for that day. The formal class does not normally cover what you should do should the technique fail. Basically, I think there should be a little heavier emphasis on the practical application of the basics. If you are planning on practicing at your own pace, then you can place the training emphasis where you see fit.

You will need to acquire a training knife and gun to properly learn/practice the system.

Probably the most important aspect of training in FIGHT, as it is in all fighting methods, is to make sure you are practicing with the proper mindset.