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Cold War Scout
12-03-2006, 09:34 AM
I know this subject has been discussed many times but it is so critical that it cannot be discussed enough.

Yesterday at the AMOK! seminar, Sotis discussed the importance of combat conditioning. It is a huge plus to have going for you when crunch time, life and detah combat happens. Interstingly he talked about how back when he was a fighter the way he trained (and many, many people trained and still do) was running 10 miles a day and doing a gazillion sit-ups and pushups. Tom added that nowadays we know more about combat conditioning.

Anaerobic conditioning is critical to success in combat. This is exactly what Team Ruthless and Ross Enamait espouse.

Frequently people at AMOK! seminars ask the question "how does one condition oneself for knife combatives." The answer remains essentially the same. Do burpees. Do thrusters. Take a serious look at Olympic style lifting with a barbell. The weights do not have to be heavy to obtain invaluable benefits. Take a look at kettlebell type training (full body movements many of which can be done with dumbbells).

It doesn't take long of all out combat (and even sparring) before the physical effort starts to catch up with you. If you can stay strong beyond the first 40 seconds, the odss will start dramatically tipping in your favor if your opponent starts to fade. He will lose speed. He will lose strength. His arms may start to drop. All of these are benefits that accrue simply from conditioning.

Cold War Scout
12-03-2006, 09:43 AM
On an additional note, at one point yesterday there was some sparring going on. A kid from the Warrior's Forge who trains under Dino and Tom Snow (a boxer), and a fighter from Baltimore who weighed 20 lbs. more than the kid from Manassas. The kid from Manassas beat the snot out of the guy from Baltimore. They had to stop the sparring session after the kid from Manassas busted the guy's nose open.

The right kind of conditioning can help you close gaps as well.

Marc "Crafty Dog" Denny
12-03-2006, 10:23 AM
What CWS is saying here is congruent with what I'm getting from my guru in these things, Chris Gizzi.

It is also why DB fights are one round, typically of 2-3 minutes each. We look to replicate the explosion of most real problems.

Even though I am retired from fighting, whenever a DB Gathering approaches I like training a bit as if I were going to be fighting. Until I caught some nasty cooties from my daughter early last month, one of the things Giz had me doing was a non-stop set of various Olympic lifts, basic barbell movements without putting the bar down.

Manwell
12-03-2006, 03:38 PM
Being in better condition than ones opponent must be a key aspect of the fight. I work-out daily… I mean every single day. It may be as simple as balance and stretching exercises, but I do at least something! I generally don’t go heavy with weights and do a lot of dumb-bell work as I believe the independent use of each arm really assists with stability strength.

My most recent goal is to greatly increase my aerobic exercise…

Manwell

Wilson
12-03-2006, 06:39 PM
Thanks for brining the subject up again. I'm 48 now and at least half the days I train I do not feel like doing it, but I always feel victorious when I'm done. Ross Enamait's book really broke up the rut I was in. Also Loren Christensen’s book and video were an encouragement and offered more options to keep me challenged. I like the fact that Loren is an older guy and still working out. His encouragement helped me keep going through 8 months of elbow pain.
Wilson

michael
12-03-2006, 06:57 PM
CWS, I'm glad you brought this topic up again, and it is very near and dear to me. I'm getting older (46), so it becomes even more important to me. I'm curious, but how does Tom stay in shape? What does he doe each time he works out now, and how has that changed over the years?

peregrine
12-03-2006, 08:02 PM
i like AMOK and the "vicous" type fight of sparring COLD.(albeit watch out for injuries as you're fairly cold). this is how you're likely to use a knife in sd.

i also like Ross E stuff a lot on conditioning, as he links a lot of his stuff to books on i respect such as the Science and practice of strength training and Supertraining. before i read RossE stuff i was using the books as my guide, but Ross basically broke it down for me in a very systematic way. There is an infomercial on tv lately on a program called px90(sp?) and it fairly copies some of those principals what Ross is doing in his sample programs. Changing the routine daily, working various energy systems, using differeing types of resistance training.
myself i like lifting weights so i am not always lifting to be the most efficient, but i enjoy it and periodize.

John McKean
12-04-2006, 10:27 AM
For an interesting look at how a lifetime of heavy lifting has benefitted one older,very well known combative warrior,check at the photo section of a new website : www.brunobrunobruno.com (http://www.brunobrunobruno.com) .Here's a 71 yr old that very few would want to mess with !!

Cold War Scout
12-04-2006, 12:48 PM
For an interesting look at how a lifetime of heavy lifting has benefitted one older,very well known combative warrior,check at the photo section of a new website : www.brunobrunobruno.com (http://www.brunobrunobruno.com) .Here's a 71 yr old that very few would want to mess with !!

Wow!! You just brought me back 40 years!!! I loved Bruno as a kid!!!!

spanky68
12-04-2006, 01:07 PM
yeah Bruno was my favorite wrestler too as a kid him and Chief J Strongbow when rasslin' was on regular tv saturdays :D

Cold War Scout
12-04-2006, 01:37 PM
yeah Bruno was my favorite wrestler too as a kid him and Chief J Strongbow when rasslin' was on regular tv saturdays :D

The real rasslin'....before it became phony like it is now.....

Manwell
12-04-2006, 02:47 PM
Just look at that bad old dude… I’m hoping I can keep it going till I’m in my 70’s.

Manwell