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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    6,875

    Default Thoughts on a mossberg 930 tactical?

    I have a 9200a1 and think it's a very good shotgun, but the button you have to push to reload it is a freeking liability. Have anyone put there had any experience with the 930?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    1,273
    Bought one after I started this thread http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...1100&highlight=

    It pretty much had all the feautures that I wanted straight off the bat so I took the plunge and bought it. To have it come stock with an 18.5" barrel, 7+1 capacity and a top rail for an RMR all at a decent price it was hard to pass up. It's more robust then my 500s and 590s were and has had zero issues cycling Winchester OO buck shot as well as Federal buck. I've run a few slugs through it but my intention was to pretty much use this with just buckshot (HD). The first thing I did when I got it was pull off the ghost ring sights and put an RMR on, other then that it's bone stock minus the addition of a flash light and a mesa 8 round sidesaddle. I got the one without a pistol grip because that's what I grew up on and learned how to shoot/load the shotgun in the field, I may put one on later but I'm pretty pleased with it as is. I've had it for a pretty short time so take my reveiw for what it's worth.
    I like (going to get poo for this) Mossberg more then Remington because I know the system better and can do most fixes on my own. If you like Remington then the general suggestion seems to be to get an 1100 tac2 or tac4. They've come down in price since I bought the 930.

  3. #3
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    Sep 2009
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    How is the reloading, do you have to hold the button down to release the floor plate?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    6,875
    Floor plate=toung that pushes shells up.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Wherever I get paid to do things other people can't or won't.
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    476
    I have the 930SPX ... similar to Yarp ... and it has been 100% solid after initial break-in. I do not know of this button issue of which you speak.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    6,875
    Let me pull out the 9200 when I get hOme. I can explain it better then.

  7. #7
    I also have the 930SPX pistol grip version. It has run flawlessly with low base #7 1/2 birdshot, slugs, and buckshot. I put a sidesaddle on it, side sling mounts, and a steel safety button. I have shot three cases of birdshot, and 50 rounds each of slugs and 00 buck through it. I bought mine after running a buddy of mine's 930SPX in -20 degree weather last winter with no issues.

    The only button it has, aside from the safety, is for locking the bolt to the rear or releasing the bolt and it is located on the right hand side of the receiver. I like this location as when you perform an emergency reload from the sidesaddle on a locked open bolt, it is an easy step to push the button, release the bolt, and it chambers the round.
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    176
    I am totally hung up on the 930 vs 1100 debate as it seems like a 50/50 from every review i read on which one is better and why. Going to try to play with both this weekend and go off of the 'feel' test.

    -Sefus

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    591
    Used two different 930s in shotgun classes both performed without issue. Friend has another 930--also no problems. Restored my faith in semi auto shotguns (outside of the Saiga family which have always done well in my experience).

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    1,273
    Quote Originally Posted by chad newton View Post
    How is the reloading, do you have to hold the button down to release the floor plate?
    Yes, you have to press the button to send the bolt carrier forward. I think it's harder to work if your using a pistol grip but to be honest with you it's only an "issue" if you run the gun dry (then you should be transitioning any way). Starting with 8 rounds of buck is a good amount and I tend to just top it off before I run it empty.
    Sending 5 or 6 rounds of buck down a stairwell or hallway tends to slow anyones advance and with a side saddle you can easily keep the muzzle up and throw a few more shells in while keeping your floating hand ready to support. Also, when you run it dry just toss one shell in and drop the bolt while you load the rest (you have to anyways) that way if you have to get a round off you still can.

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