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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    175

    Default ACRG with Randy Harris 11/12-13/11

    Just got back home from a great weekend in the south, and I wanted to put up a quick review for anyone on the fence about the class.

    First things first. I want to say what a great group of guys we had. I had trained with all but one of the guys before, and the new guy was up to speed very quick.

    If you haven't taken a class from Randy you are missing out. I have had a lot of teachers/instructors over the years, but never have I come across someone who really seems to be vested in his teachings.

    ACRG has a very well laid out structure. Going from close, to far, and fast to slow. Constantly through both days, you are asked to make quick shots while exploding off the x, followed by well aimed shots on smaller farther tagets. We also covered moving in all directions while accessing our pistols, as well as different shooting positions. One of my favorite parts of the class was shooting drills. I like drills because they are a good baseline of your skill level. You can set these up on your home range every so often, and see how your training is going The class was a great step from DPS, and CRG. It took a lot of what I had learned earlier, and expanded, as well as reinforced things I need to work on.*

    ***

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    McDonough, GA
    Posts
    22
    Another excellent class put on by Randy. I really enjoyed the structure of this class, as OHtard stated, having to move back and forth from distance to close range, having to adjust the speed you engage the targets at, and moving from no sight picture to steady sight picture from a stable position. It kept me from ever getting comfortable, which is excellent on Randy's part for not letting us do. Outside that comfort zone is where we truly grow.

    I think Randy may be to the point of beating me with a stick he has to tell me to slow down so much when shooting distance. This class mixes things up very well, and makes the student have to change pace, even within the drill. One drill deals with engaging one close range target and one about 10-15 yards away, where you have to slow down a bit to get good hits. The class also has tons of drills moving from small target to small target, larger target to smaller target, and smaller target to larger target.

    I feel like I left the class with a better understanding of how to pace things as the distance and size of targets change. You definitely walk away with plenty of drills you can work on your own to get better. I know anytime I shoot from distance, I'll hear Randy saying "Slow down and press the trigger straight to the rear".

    Another good group of guys in the class. It's good to train with everyone again and look forward to training with y'all all again. I also second what OHtard said about training with Randy. I haven't trained with too many other firearm instructors, but what he has taught has made me a much better shooter than from my first class at SI, and continues to show me where and how to improve. Even though, sometimes I need to be smacked in head to get some things across.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    175
    Nothing wrong with learning the hard way. Sometimes those are the best lessons to learn.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    10,170
    You guys looked like you had a good grasp of what Randy was teaching the little bit I got to observe.

    Pleasure getting to talk with you for that short time.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Chattanooga TN
    Posts
    3,489
    Thanks guys.

    Perfection takes many forms. There are many different areas that one needs to be familiar with when dealing with a wide array of interpersonal problem solving. A simple situation like a "7-11 robbery" is an example. If YOU are the object of the robbers attention (like the clerk) then your response will likely be a bit different than if you are a patron in the beer aisle who the robber never saw when he came in. One guy will have time and distance and need to thread the needle with a precise shot in order to stop the situation and not hit the clerk. The clerk needs to get out from in front of the robber's gun muzzle and produce a gun QUICKLY and burn the BG down before he can react.

    This class works both ends of that. Most classes work one OR the other. This one works at perfecting BOTH. After all we never know when we might be the intended victim of a mugger ....or when we might be an "in the wrong place" bystander when the active shooter shows up to avenge himself of all the wrongs that society has heaped upon him.

    Precise shots at over 50 yards with a pistol? Get off the X and point shooting in ALL directions? BOTH get covered in this class.

    As Wbacker says....there are times when slowing down a LITTLE will make the hit happen.....after all fast misses don't help. And then there are times when there just is not enough time do anything slow. With a background in shooting precisely but FAST, I know where the breaking point is between the two and can generally coax better performance out of just about anyone. On Saturday we pushed them on precise shooting, trigger control and getting on the sights. Sunday morning for the warmup drill we shot 1 inch dots at 5 yards and everyone was scoring hits.Some completely shot away the dot with the first 5 rounds . That makes me smile.

    Wbacker mentioned me getting on him about slowing down at distance to insure a first round hit. That is true. When the target is a reduced size metal target that roughly equates to the size of an adult human from diaphragm to neck and only as wide as the chest from nipple to nipple you have to slow down just a little at 35 yards. Of course up close he gets off the X like a gazelle and gets smokin' fast hits on target....because he works onthat regularly ....so in his case the precision needs a little bit more concentration.

    This class was about not letting you dwell in your comfort areas for very long and making you grow as a shooter. The up close get off the x work for guys who are bullseye shooters also throws in them the deep end of the pool with the emphasis on getting the heck off the X and going form reactive to PROactive in the blink of an eye. You are not a point shooter OR a sighted fire shooter....YOU ARE A SHOOTER. PERIOD. And I'm looking to make you an EXCELLENT shooter...period.

    One issue we discussed was that as we start backing into "pistol sniping" distance it is pretty important to know where your sights are zeroed and know what your ammo's trajectory is. Different height sights will have some effect on things.And the SIZE of your sights will have an effect. If they are too big to see the target then things just got a bit more tricky. Changing ammo will also have some effect as you start backing out to the long end of 100 yards. So if you zero with softball practice loads and then carry super hot ammo then your point of impact will change a bit. And of course just settling down and staying focused and not trying to shoot too fast for the distance involved is always important. Wouldn't you say so Ohtard?

    The reason I kept switching it up was to keep the pressure on and not let anyone get comfortable. Just when you were getting comfy getting off the X and firing a fast burst , we'd back it out to deal with the active shooter and force that picture perfect sight picture and smooth as glass trigger press to come to the forefront...well, at least if you wanted to actually hit the target. And some drills made you deal with BOTH.

    You see some of us have known for a long time that there is no real argument between point shooting and precise sighted fire. You simply do what you need to when you need to and the better you can do it the better off you are.If you need to take off and get your gun out and fire a burst reactively you do it. If you need to make an eye socket qaulity shot at 10 yards you simply do it. ANd if you need to make a vital zone upper torso shot at 75 you just get behind the sights and do it. After this class I feel pretty confident that these guys are well on their way to being able to handle whatever may arise from 3 yards to 100....and maybe a little farther.

    Wbacker....SLOW down...breathe........... and P...r...e...s...s....(or I'll hit you with a stick.....)
    Last edited by Randy Harris; 11-17-2011 at 07:52 PM.
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor
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    TRAIN with me....https://suarezinternational.com/sear...h_query=harris

    Fundamentalist Christian Man at Arms

    AKA - CRUEL HAND LUKE

    Joel 3:10 - Beat your plowshares into swords , and your pruning hooks into spears; train even your weaklings to be warriors.

    Through HIS power I can walk on water..IF I just have the faith and courage to get out of the boat.

    A good man who's done a couple of bad things along the way....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    175
    Well said Randy. Seeing what you need to see, when you need to see it has been the way I have always shot. I sometimes have issues with the speed change between distances(short to far). I am trying though.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    10,170
    Quote Originally Posted by Randy Harris View Post
    One issue we discussed was that as we start backing into "pistol sniping" distance it is pretty important to know where your sights are zeroed and know what your ammo's trajectory is. Different height sights will have some effect on things.And the SIZE of your sights will have an effect. If they are too big to see the target then things just got a bit more tricky.
    Randy, I found all this out in a non-SI class a few years ago.

    While my irons seemed to be zeroed fine for close-range, once I started shooting at 100yds, I found a center hold on a reduced target caused me to just miss to the left.

    My expedient, solution was to hold to the opposite edge to allow center hits until I had time to bump the rear over just a bit.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Chattanooga TN
    Posts
    3,489
    Mike Swisher was running into the same issue this weekend . Even though we may be dead on at the close zero (say 10 yards for an RMR) you still need to shoot it at the far zero distance (probably 70) to make SURE your windage is on. Just like with a rifle. If you zero at 50 you still need to shoot at 200-225 at some point to make SURE your windage is good for the far distance.
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor
    NRA Certified Instructor
    Tennessee State Handgun Carry Permit Instructor
    Glock Factory Certified Armorer
    IDPA Master Class SSP, ESP,CDP, CCP, BUG, CO
    Gung Ho Chuan Association

    TRAIN with me....https://suarezinternational.com/sear...h_query=harris

    Fundamentalist Christian Man at Arms

    AKA - CRUEL HAND LUKE

    Joel 3:10 - Beat your plowshares into swords , and your pruning hooks into spears; train even your weaklings to be warriors.

    Through HIS power I can walk on water..IF I just have the faith and courage to get out of the boat.

    A good man who's done a couple of bad things along the way....

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