The Suarez Method
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  1. #1
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    Default An RMR Will Make You a Better Shooter

    If you read the Warriortalk News blog or hang out on the forum, you’ve probably already heard about the truly fantastic shooting performance that a SI TSD pistol with a Trijicon RMR red dot sight mounted on the slide makes possible. Hits out to 200 or 300 yards are doable. Hitting a torso sized target at 100 is almost easy, as are headshots at 25 yards. At seven yards, you’re choosing which eye socket you want the round to go through. I don’t think anyone would be surprised if I said that you’ll shoot better with an RMR than an iron sighted gun. That’s not quite what I’m saying here, however. What I’m saying is that if you take the time to master a TSD pistol with an RMR, it will make you a better shooter even with an iron sighted pistol.

    I was led to this conclusion by two recent experiences with TSD pistols:

    I have always used the stock 5.5 pound Glock trigger. This was not based on some fear of liability or any of the other reasons for sticking with the stock trigger weight that are floating around out there, I simply never felt that the trigger weight inhibited my accuracy. That changed when I shot my TSD G17, particularly at longer ranges. As I concentrated intently on pressing the trigger smoothly to the rear, the trigger weight would stack up and the dot started wavering from side to side. I was still able to hit at a hundred yards, but it was obvious that the trigger weight, particularly right before the break, was having an effect on my accuracy. I’ve since installed the Lone Wolf 3.5 pound connector and there’s definitely a noticeable improvement.

    The second incident that led me to this conclusion came when fellow S.I. instructor Alex Nieuwland and I were shooting our TSD Glocks the other day. Alex tested his carry load, shooting about a handspan sized group at 50 yards. When he switched to Winchester White Box practice ammo, however, he had trouble keeping it on the 3’x4’ target. We went through several different brands of practice ammo (Winchester, Federal, Magtech, American Eagle, and Wolf) and found enormous variation in accuracy at this distance.

    What do trigger pull and testing different practice loads have in common? In both cases the RMR exposed existing issues with the gun and ammunition that we hadn’t been aware of when shooting with iron sights. Putting the RMR on didn’t make my trigger pull or Alex’s practice ammo worse, it just laid bare their deficiencies. It will do the same thing to your shooting skills.

    Maintaining a proper sight alignment is one of the most difficult elements of sighted fire with a pistol. It is difficult to teach, and difficult to perform in practice. When shooting at long ranges (or very small targets) even small variations can lead to large effects. One millimeter of front sight misalignment will result in being off over half a meter at 100 meters. The RMR eliminates this. There is no need to align front and rear sights with the target, just put the dot on it. Eliminating sight alignment as a source of error not only makes your shooting more accurate, it also means that other sources of error are much more obvious. With iron sights an unsteady hold, improper trigger press, flinch, inaccurate ammo, or a heavy trigger may be masked by variations in sight alignment. With a red dot, these effects are obvious, both on the target, and in many cases in the visible movement of the dot as the shot breaks.

    The other way that mastering an RMR will make you a better shooter is by pushing you to practice shots that you might not even have attempted with iron sights. Before I got my TSD Glock, I seldom shot beyond seven yards, and almost never beyond 25. Once I shot my pistol at 100 yards on a lark, but I wasn’t really serious about it. Knowing what a TSD gun is capable of has pushed me to put considerably more effort into my long range skills, and in making very accurate hits at closer ranges (eye sockets on photo targets in particular). Shooting at longer ranges will make even small accuracy problems evident. A flinch that throws a bullet a few inches low at seven yards might take it completely off the target at 100. Longer range shooting really demands complete concentration and close to perfect technique.

    If you put in the time and practice to truly master an RMRed pistol you will eliminate a lot of small errors that were either obscured by sight alignment or invisible at shorter ranges. When you shoot a pistol with only iron sights, you will have to deal with the traditional issues of sight alignment. However, you will retain the improvements you learned with the RMR. Your overall shooting skills will have made a giant step forward. A TSD gun with an RMR won’t just make you shoot better with that gun, it will make you a better shooter with any pistol.

    See An RMR Will Make You a Better Shooter on Warriortalk News.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Chris, I have to agree with you 100%. I did notice much of what you said in a very short practice session with my TSD Glock. I would like to add that having an RMR will show deficiencies in your trigger pull that even dry fire practice will help smooth out.

    Blessed is the man who remains steadfast under trial, for when he has stood the test he will receive the crown of life, which God has promised to those who love him.

    James 1:12


    "Nothing is personal - everything is from God." -Mikhail Ryabko

  3. #3
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    I've found it an excellent training tool as well. Good article.
    Ceterum autem censeo, Carthaginem esse delendam

  4. #4
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    I always thought of the dry fire practice trigger as a little bit of a luxury. But now, I will have to get one to make my training more efficent.

    http://www.onesourcetactical.com/the...re-setkit.aspx

    Blessed is the man who remains steadfast under trial, for when he has stood the test he will receive the crown of life, which God has promised to those who love him.

    James 1:12


    "Nothing is personal - everything is from God." -Mikhail Ryabko

  5. #5
    I don't own an RMR Glock...but I can plainly see that this is the future.

    Seen Gabe's name referenced positively from many other forums that I lurk...seems that even the haters recognize him as the go-to man for CCW dotpistols.

    Thinking about where this is going to gets me f*cking excited. Some big stuff happening nowadays for sure.
    We say weep until the weeping’s done,
    And we shall weep for another day;
    For what binds us to our grief,
    Binds the sculptor to his clay;

    --



  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Nice info Chris.
    Have you found an accurate training ammo?
    Paul

    Seek first the Kingdom of God

  7. #7
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    May 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by paranoid View Post
    Have you found an accurate training ammo?
    Oddly enough, I find that the 115 grain steel case Russian stuff (Wolf, Brown Bear) is quite accurate out of my gun. In fact, it's just about as accurate as my carry load.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Thomaston, GA
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    Chris,

    Great information and writeup.

    Mike

  9. #9
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    Jan 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Upchurch View Post
    Oddly enough, I find that the 115 grain steel case Russian stuff (Wolf, Brown Bear) is quite accurate out of my gun. In fact, it's just about as accurate as my carry load.
    I've found the same with both my G19 and 26.

  10. #10
    I have been going through retraining with a RMR sighted glock pistol and i notice the one thing that i posted on this forum .At 7 yard's mark to the 15 yard mark the Red dot RMR acts as to me as a giant ghost ring sight if i just keep the sight pointed at the person chest area .

    I found this out by a stupid mistake that i was not picking up the dot at first and then trying to center the dot in the middle of the sight picture .If i let myself relax a little during the draw stoke and bringing the pistol to eye level and not trying to force my eyes to come to find the dot in the middle of the picture .

    Instead just let the sight and the dot come togerther in a one quick alignment of the eye and the dot on the target .Once i figure that out and stop trying to force my eyes to sight's system like a regular iron sighted pistol it became easlyer for me to get hit's on target .

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