Page 1 of 8 123456 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 75
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    10,355

    Default How Dynamic is Your Dynamic Movement?

    How Dynamic is your Dynamic Movement?



    First we must look at the two words as defined by Webster.

    Dynamic: (1) : of or relating to physical force or energy : energetic, forceful

    Movement: (1) : the act or process of moving; especially : change of place or position or posture (2) : a particular instance or manner of moving b (1) : a tactical or strategic shifting of a military unit : maneuver (2) : the advance of a military unit


    So if we are looking at this topic of dynamic movement in the context of a gun fight what can we take away for Mr. Webster. The action weather exploding off the X, seeking cover, returning fire, breaking contact, or advancing on the enemy needs to be fast, forceful, aggressive, decisive, and deliberate. Fire needs to be accurate, continuous, and vicious, we’re not spraying rounds all willy-nilly hoping to hit something.
    DSC_0024-1.jpg
    Let’s break this down. If you watch any movies or cop shows you’re probably aware of the Goucho walk, the bent kneed, heel to toe, awkward fashion of movement. There is a purpose for this but if this is your idea of “Dynamic Movement” and you don’t operate on a daily basis with hard plates and a team you’re going to find this to be ineffective at best. You see this done as a team because you only have a limited sector of fire or area of responsibility. You are directing your movement and fire in that small direction as well as presenting your plates to receive incoming fire and meeting hostility with accurate fire to minimize the possibility of collateral injury. From a partisan/ccw perspective the whole is to not get hit until you can access your firearm, find cover, go hands on, or escape and evade the hostile action.
    DSC_0671-1.jpg
    I’m going to assume that I’m talking to the everyday CCW holder with a bit of training. If you’re heard the phrase “slow is smooth, smooth is fast” what they are talking about isn’t slowing down it’s being deliberate. Your draw stroke is deliberate, from clearing your garment to your PTO, it’s deliberate. Breaking off the X, from the flinch to sprint, is deliberate. Dynamic refers entirely to the force with which you perform these deliberate actions and movement is referring to displacing yourself from the line of fire and the acts of accessing you firearm and putting it to use to defend yourself or others. What I’m getting to is when you run this dry are you just walking through the footwork and hand motions? Are you practicing your draw stroke without a cover garment? Do you prone out just to get on the ground or ease yourself to a kneeling position after strolling over to low cover? If you are you’re cheating yourself and your training in my humble and accurate opinion.
    DSC_0611-1.jpg
    Now the work, getting more dynamic is work. There are muscle groups that are important and action habits that need ingrained. Let’s start with the hardware, the muscles. A PTO is a full body action requiring the use of hands, arms, legs, and core body. The hands and arms need to clear the garment, grab the pistol, make the draw stroke, and mitigate recoil. The legs need to load, make directional adjustment, and provide forward momentum. The core body is driving your targeted x off the line of fire, twisting and driving to your direction of travel and orienting after the draw stroke to deliver fire on the threat. To get these muscle groups in condition involves, practice and exercise. Add regular wind sprints (at your level of fitness) and directional changes from standing and moving. For the software we are looking at the draw stroke, getting positive control of the weapon. The foot work, including the orientation to the direction of travel or the take off. The body articulation, dropping off the targeted X. Finally the orientation of the weapon to target. All if this software is found in the SI classes at the intro level and above. The Close-Range Gunfighting DVDs I found to be a wonderful resource.
    crrgfio20111877-1.jpg
    Always put 100% deliberateness into your movement and cover strategy, but be forceful about it, be Dynamic about it. When you break off the X have a solid grip on your weapon, push your posture down off the line of fire, drive to whichever o’clock you move to. Deliberately, Dynamically identify your target and rain Hell upon him, Dynamically and deliberately find and seek cover and throw yourself into the experience of it. Scrape your knees and elbows up, blood washes off, clothes can be mended or replaced, skin grows back. Get bruises and rug burns, smack your funny bone on the kitchen table because you dropped below the window sill too fast. It’s training it’s supposed to make you stretch, take you out of your comfort zone and make you sweat. Lets work together to put the Dynamic back into Dynamic movement.


    Greg Nichols, Suarez International Staff instructor
    Last edited by Greg Nichols; 11-27-2015 at 08:32 AM.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Va.
    Posts
    6,684
    AWESOME...I just learned more in the last ten minutes reading and re-reading that, then re-reading it again and understanding it than I have in the last 6 months...good job...Now I just have to get my ass to an SI class to really learn it.


    CRG-Suarez International Combat Pistol Instructor

    SIG SAUER CERTIFIED ARMORER M400, 516, 716, M4, AR15, M16


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    358
    Thanks for posting this.
    When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty.

    Thomas Jefferson

    Carry enough gun.

    Robert Ruark

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,169
    Great article, fuzzy. You said something at crg that has stuck with me, and you mentioned it again here. Getting off the x is more than moving your feet. You gotta drive your torso and head down and off the x too.
    Stay dangerous, my friends.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    4,385
    Fantastic post. Smart money says this is headed for a sticky.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    1,080
    Very good post. This is one of the few that talks about it probably going to hurt to do it right.
    Montani Semper Liberi
    "Mountaineers Always Free"

    "Now, let me explain this to you. We are not afraid of you or any of your
    terrorist co-conspirators, Mr. Reid. We are Americans. We have been through
    the fire before."
    Judge William Young, US District Court to the Shoe Bomber

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    10,355
    This is one of the few that talks about it probably going to hurt to do it right
    Understanding the difference between hurt and injured is important here, you're going to get skinned up doing it right but to push to the point of injury is counter productive.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    1,080
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Nichols View Post
    Understanding the difference between hurt and injured is important here, you're going to get skinned up doing it right but to push to the point of injury is counter productive.
    That is what I mean...bandaides but not bandages.
    Montani Semper Liberi
    "Mountaineers Always Free"

    "Now, let me explain this to you. We are not afraid of you or any of your
    terrorist co-conspirators, Mr. Reid. We are Americans. We have been through
    the fire before."
    Judge William Young, US District Court to the Shoe Bomber

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    49,554
    Well....if one spends their time on the range wolfing down Krispy Kremes, and their time off range swilling down cheap whiskey in between chain smoking three packs of Marlboros.....not very dynamic at all....regardless of what they may once have done.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    The New World
    Posts
    2,452
    Congratulation on an outstanding descriptive explanation of dynamic movement!
    Move like a lion intent on his prey/meal.
    Paul

    America First
    Anti Globalist


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •