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Thread: Diet

  1. #41
    Guantes,
    Find the book, Eat right for your type.

    Its all about food, blood types and such.
    -Paul Sharp
    "In the midst of chaos is opportunity" - Terrence McKenna

    http://isrmatrix.blogspot.com/

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    669
    Quote Originally Posted by JOE MACK
    Hmmm...but we've got better teeth and smell better on the average. Plus, I hate women with hairy legs and underarms! :D
    You have to visit Iceland. Their women are yummy :) And they shave and smell good. Even have good teeth. I also found German girls to be very, very nice :)

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Idaho
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    5,407
    Paul,
    Please excuse my dullard nature. Which book are you referring to?
    "Many men are able, most aren't willing"
    J.B. Books

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Eat Right For Your Type is the name of the book. Superimposed over the word "for" is the number 4. I personally would get "Neanderthin" instead.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Idaho
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    Thanks T, I will look into both.
    "Many men are able, most aren't willing"
    J.B. Books

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    You're welcome. You probably already know this, but it seems every used book store I've been in has a copy of the blood type book. I got a copy for, I believe, $.75.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    New Mexico
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    Default Some good reading

    Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, National Academies Press; Institute of Medicine, 500 Fifth Street NW, Washington DC 20001. 2002. 1408 pages.

    Fifth in a series, but probably the most relevant of that series to this thread. These are the studies being used to re-write the USRDA tables.

    Summary:
    This new report establishes ranges for fat, carbohydrates and protein and stresses the importance of balancing diet with exercise. Highlights of the report include:

    - Adults should get 45 percent to 65 percent of their calories from carbohydrates, 20 percent to 35 percent from fat, and 10 to 35 percent from protein. Acceptable ranges for children are similar to those for adults, except that infants and younger children need a slightly higher proportion of fat (25 %-40%).

    - To maintain cardiovascular health, regardless of weight, adults and children should achieve a total of at least one hour of moderately intense physical activity each day.

    -Added sugars should comprise no more than 25 percent of total calories consumed. Added sugars are those incorporated into foods and beverages during production which usually provide insignificant amounts of vitamins, minerals, or other essential nutrients. Major sources include soft drinks, fruit drinks, pastries, candy, and other sweets.

    - The recommended intake for total fiber for adults 50 years and younger is set at 38 grams for men and 25 grams for women, while for men and women over 50 it is 30 and 21 grams per day, respectively, due to decreased food consumption.

    - Using new data, the report reaffirms previously established recommended levels of protein intake, which is 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight for adults; however recommended levels for pregnancy are increased.

    - The report doesn't set maximum levels for saturated fat, cholesterol, or trans fatty acids, as increased risk exists at levels above zero, however the recommendation is to eat as little as possible while consuming a diet adequate in important other essential nutrients

    - Recommendations are made for linoleic acid (an omega-6 fatty acid) and for alpha-linolenic acid (an omega- 3 fatty acid)
    This book can be read online, free, here.

  8. #48
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    Jan 2004
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    I don't think I could disagree more on their calorie percentage breakdown.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    New Mexico
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    Chapter 10 contains a reasonable critique of the nitrogen balance method for determining protein requirements, however they continue to use it, citing the absence of a characterized alternative - but they do also discuss other methods. Also, their protein recommendation is for "maintainance" level in "average" adults, whose total protein composition is under 50% skeletal muscle, and who would probably be characterized by some as "grass-eaters." Other studies have shown that athletes and people engaged in serious training (which should include all of us) that increases muscle fiber size and/or number, do better with 2-3x the "maintainance" protein level they suggest.
    Last edited by Lloyd; 08-03-2005 at 11:40 AM.

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