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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Western SC
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    370

    Default What's the basic loadout for the beginner?

    For someone just starting down the road of pistolcraft, what would you consider to be the minimum gear required?

    Personally, I think a range membership is top on the list. A lot of areas have open public ranges, usu in a wilderness area, but if that's not an option you should shell out the bucks for a year's membership at an indoor range. Reason? Because if you pay as you go, you will find a lot of reasons to not go.

    After that, I'd say three magazines, carry gear, a range bag, and a timer. The timer's sole purpose is to give you a benchmark to improve on.

    Basic drills, draw and fire one shot, against a timer, will serve you a lot better and are more realistic, then complicated drills that might not be possible on the range you use. Accuracy work, shooting for a tight group at 25yd, is key to developing an understanding of sight picture/alignment and trigger control. It is the keystone to better shooting overall.

    Another option, and just an option, is a good .22 pistol or conversion unit so you can practice trigger pull and sight control for cheap. Any trigger time makes you a better shot with your carry piece.
    When reason fails.....

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Not of this world
    Posts
    17,719
    Gas powered Airsoft pistol to work on your marksmanship and tactics at home, later incorporating FOF drills.
    **Mike Ronin on FaceBook**

    **Spero optimus instruo pro pessimus**

    **Out of destruction rises opportunity. We are only defeated when we give up. Never, ever give up. (Phil 4:13)**

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    98
    For the enthusiast I would suggest A 1911 and a small .22 auto as trainer and backup gun with a grip angle as close to that 1911 as can be found. And one combat flashlight and holster. And holsters for both guns as well.

    For persons who want the minimum or the most practical gun I would say a .357 5 shot revolver and the small .22 revolver as a trainer and backup gun.

    The revolvers I do recomend for the small handed or for anybody who for whatever reason will not be practicing often. I will also emphasize that these revolvers need not be a disadvantage compared to the autos. This .22 or .38/.357 is very quick and a quick stopper in the hands of one who is sure and serious about their purpose. And a revolver can be cocked one handed for any shots which are beyond very close distances. They are also less costly and less likely to have a failure to feed the next cartridge. And also more likely to work fresh out of the box.

    I have shot both autos and revolvers. But for a beginner who is going to be busy with other training or whatever I will confidantly recommend the 5-shot .357 revolver as a good carry and shooting gun. And the .22 to practice with as that .357 is LOUD. So a quieter gun like the .22 will be an easier gun with which to find a place to practice with without disturbing the peaple.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    54
    For someone just starting out the best single thing they can do imho is to take a beginning pistol shooting class. Women seem to be so much smarter about this than men. I think that we guys think oh I can do this by myself without instruction. In so doing we often develop bad habits that must later be unlearned.

    I agree with getting regular practice too and in fact I think it is best to do after receiving training because it will focus the practice towards more useful shooting.

    As far as equipment. I like .22s but if one was on a tight budget I'd start them out with a 9mm. This is a caliber that can be carried and used for effective home defense. It is fairly easy to learn with particularly with professional instruction and the practice ammo is pretty inexpensive.

    For a particular gun in general I recommend that the user find a well made name brand pistol that fits them. With that said though I think it's very worthwhile to consider a Glock. They make three sizes of 9mm pistols. They are the easiest semiautos to clean and maintain and they are very reliable. Add a good carry holster, this isn't the place to scrimp, a few extra mags and some thorough attention to clothing for concealment.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    16,899
    I would pick up a few more magazines, not all at once but every month or so until you had about six.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Tidewater,VA
    Posts
    4,998
    The range is good, what ever pistol or revolver you intend to use and a quality 22 for alot of practice, lose the timer for now, staywith trigger control/sights and trigger press, quickness will come with practice, if your range offers classes, ask to set in on one and see if they have any thing that is of intrest to you. Just remember what ole man Earpp said "Speed is dandy, but accuracy is deadly"
    All animals except man know that the ultimate of life is to enjoy it.

    Samuel Butler


    FACIEM TUAM, DOMINC, REQUIRAM

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Western SC
    Posts
    370
    I can see how the timer might be too much for the beginner, as it is a rather hefty pricetag. Heck, I didn't get mine until well into my shooting evolution.

    Revolver or Semi? I'd go with a revolver, hands down. It's often easier, in my experience, to find a revolver that fits the shooter's hand. Another benefit is that a revolver is "simple" in that it doesn't overwhelm the new shooter with a long manual of arms. What might seem like simple to us experienced shooters, often stumps newbies....especially the fieldstripping.

    Magazines? Well, you can never have too many of those!

    9mm? Sounds like a good idea because it gives you a very cheap overall cost. A good makarov or arcus will set you back very little and ammunition costs are almost (not quite there) a match for .22 longrifle. You get to shoot a lot but have a weapon that's good for defense and carry.

    Keep the ideas coming, gents.
    When reason fails.....

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    123

    Default Keep It Simple..

    I'd recommend starting with a 9mm. A Glock 17 or 19, because they are always in demand, they hold up well, they are simple to operate, and you can get your money's worth out of them if you like something else better. You don't have to worry about dry practice with the centerfire cartridge pistols.

    And 9mm can be had for <$90/case.

    Add:
    2 extra Clinton mags (for practice)
    Double mag pouch
    Blade-Tech straight drop holster (outside the waistband)
    Wilderness Instructor Belt
    SureFire G2 (or 6P)
    BoreSnake
    Your favorite CLP (I like MPro-7, but BreakFree will do nicely)
    Wrap-around safety glasses
    Hearing protection (I like the Peltor electronic, but I'd also pack some extra foam plugs for indoors or a friend)
    Some Wet-Ones or Baby Wipes to get the lead off your hands/face
    A simple range bag (I use a small gym bag)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    312
    David,

    I read back a little bit and figured as much and deleted my question when I read more of the thread. Thanks.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    859
    My first thought when I read David's post was "That's a lot of stuff to digest for a first year!"

    After re-reading it a couple of times, I think it is a very well planned, focused regimen that should yield maximum results while saving you time and money that would otherwise be wasted.

    Take this for example:
    "one strong side belt holster"

    I can't tell you how many threads I've read elsewhere complaining about not being able to afford good training, while in another thread proudly displaying the newest in a series of shark trimmed pimp rigs that cost them what a good 2 day class would.

    "After your first year of shooting with your weapon you should rent some other makers models that you may also like and shoot them"

    Again, money saved by not becoming a "collector" right away is money spent on ammo and training. Avoid gun of the month syndrome.

    David, I have a couple of questions where I need clarification. You said "at least two spare magazine carriers". Did you mean carry two spare mags or two pouches (2 singles or 2 doubles) ?

    You also said "continue to purchase and use 10-20,000+rds of ammo each year". How do you advocate dividing that up? One or two large sessions per week/month, or a small session every day or two to build the habit?
    "Let us speak courteously, deal fairly, and keep ourselves armed and ready."
    Teddy Roosevelt - San Francisco, CA, May 13, 1903

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