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  1. #11
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    Dec 2008
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    Little tidbit I picked up from a guy who visited Germany. The common practice for the thugs/gangs over there was to carry two knives, so that if you dropped one after using it, and the cops searched you, they couldn't say it was yours because you were the only guy without one in a group.
    Also, IIRC, he said that they used rough antler or bone handles because it was almost impossible to get a usable print off them.
    "He who lives by the sword, gets shot by he who don't."
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ragsbo View Post
    Okay, I admit it, I'm ignorant. You all keep talking about different types of locks on knives. Could someone explain the difference to me please? What type of lock does Spyderco have?
    LOCKING MECHANISMS
    1) LOCKING LINER - this particular locking system was refined by knifemaker Michael Walker. The actual locking mechanism is incorporated in the liner of the handle, hence the name. If there is a metal sheet inside the handle material, it is called a liner. With a locking liner, opening the blade will allow this metal will flex over and butt against the base of the blade inside the handle, locking it open. Moving this liner aside will release this lock allowing the blade to close. Disengagement of the lock is performed with the thumb, allowing for one handed, hassle free action. Locking liners are commonly found on tactical folders, both production and custom.
    2) LOCKBACK - this style of lock has a spring-loaded locking bar with a tooth at the end. The tooth falls into the notch cut into the blade tang and is held there under the spring tension. A cut out in the handle spine houses the release for the lock. These locks generally require 2 hands to unlock and close.
    3) Axis lock - A patented Benchmade exclusive, AXIS has been turning heads and winning fans ever since its introduction. A 100-percent ambidextrous design, AXIS gets its function from a small, hardened steel bar which rides forward and back in a slot machined into both steel liners. The bar extends to both sides of the knife, spanning the liners and positioned over the rear of the blade. It engages a ramped, tang portion of the knife blade when it is opened. Two omega style springs, one on each liner, give the locking bar itís inertia to engage the knife tang, and as a result the tang is wedged solidly between a sizable stop pin and the AXIS bar itself.
    4) Frame lock - Similar to a liner lock, but a part of the actual handle flexes over to lock the blade in place.
    BLADE GRINDS

    1) HOLLOW GRIND
    the most common grind, found on the majority of custom and production pieces. Hollow ground blades have a thin edge that continues upwards, and is the grind is produced on both sides of the blade. Since the cutting edge is relatively thin, there is very little drag when cutting. Examples of knives with hollow ground blades: Spyderco Howard Viele C42 and Kershaw Ti-ATS-34.

    2) FLAT GRIND
    Flat grinds are characterized by the tapering of the blade from the spine down to the cutting edge. This style of grind is also referred to as a "V" grind, since the cross section of this grind resembles that letter. The chisel grind, a popular style for tactical blades, is a variation of the flat grind. On a chisel round blade, it is ground on one side, and on the other it is not. These blades are easier to sharpen, because you sharpen one side only. Example of a knife with a chisel ground blade would be the Benchmade 970 Ernest Emerson CQC7. Examples of knives with a flat grind are the Benchmade Mel Pardue 850 and Spyderco's C36 Military model.

    3) CONCAVE GRIND
    Similar to the flat grind in that the blade tapers from the spine to the cutting edge, except the taper lines are arcs instead of straight lines.

    4) CONVEX GRIND
    Similar to the flat grind in that the blade tapers from the spine to the cutting edge, except the taper lines are arcs extending outward instead of inward as in the convex grind above or straight lines. If you picture a pumpkin seed, you will get a good idea of what the cross sectional view of this grind is like. Noted custom knife maker Bill Moran is credited for bringing the convex grind into the focus of knife making.
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  3. #13
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    Oct 2003
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    Thanks for the info.
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  4. #14
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    What about the SOG Spec-Elite II? Is it a good knife with a good lock? I cant really tell from just an internet photo and info...
    "Anyone too proud to learn is too arrogant to win a fight" -Gabe Suarez

    "We should provide in peace what we need in war." -Publilius Syrus

    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing." -Edmund Burke

    "Men trained in arms from their infancy, and animated by the love of liberty, will afford neither a cheap or easy conquest." -Declaration of the Continental Congress, July 1775.

  5. #15
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    The more I work on this Killing-focused system, the more I am liking reverse grip - edge in. That means for a righty, you carry point up- blade forward.
    I'd add that the a handle should not force you into a grip.

    Why edge in?

    I've gone totally over to reverse grip now, even for ranged fighting as I like the common software across flashlights, knives, pens, etc (SN's stuff in excellent). I prefer edge out to get the benefit of cutting while clearing limbs.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wraith 2-1 View Post
    What about the SOG Spec-Elite II? Is it a good knife with a good lock? I cant really tell from just an internet photo and info...
    SOG makes quality products. I looked at the specs and design of this one, and there is a lot to like. A big blade, good steel, good locking mechanism, but heavy. The weight would be the only downside to this one, but as far as quality goes, it would be excellent.
    **Mike Ronin on FaceBook**

    **Spero optimus instruo pro pessimus**

    **Out of destruction rises opportunity. We are only defeated when we give up. Never, ever give up. (Phil 4:13)**

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Scottsdale, AZ
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    How about a chainsaw?




    sorry... I had to :p
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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael View Post
    SOG makes quality products. I looked at the specs and design of this one, and there is a lot to like. A big blade, good steel, good locking mechanism, but heavy. The weight would be the only downside to this one, but as far as quality goes, it would be excellent.
    Yeah I have some of their knives. They are quality. What I was looking for is anyone with any hands on experience. I want to hold one...just to see how it opens...how it balances...and what not. But I havent seen one anywhere around here. But overall the knife seems to have everything I look for in a tactical folder. As for the weight...I dont mind some heft in my knives and compared to the fixed blades I used to carry its nothing.
    "Anyone too proud to learn is too arrogant to win a fight" -Gabe Suarez

    "We should provide in peace what we need in war." -Publilius Syrus

    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing." -Edmund Burke

    "Men trained in arms from their infancy, and animated by the love of liberty, will afford neither a cheap or easy conquest." -Declaration of the Continental Congress, July 1775.

  9. #19
    Peter Pauer's Avatar
    Peter Pauer is offline Suarez International Representative - Slovakia
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    Apr 2008
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    I want to add just one thing regarding the size - length. Size is important (that is what my girlfriend says), but it is like with pistols. If you choose too big and bulky tool, you probably leave it back home.

    Regarding all the other mentioned things. I agree with most of them, but knife is also just a tool. If you have a choice, choose the best one. If not, take anything you can get. Bad knife is better, than no knife. The biggest difference in a knife fight will make mindset and fighting skills, not the knife itself.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    10,174
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabe Suarez View Post
    ...the more I am liking reverse grip - edge in. That means for a righty, you carry point up- blade forward.
    Since taking 0-5 Gunfighting, I've realized the need for a weapon that can be reached with the off-hand. I recently bought a Spyderco P'Kal and have it set up in a similar fashion, except for left-hand draw. I like it very well so far.

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