Easter Specials 2014
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    2,601
    I have been using a similar method with my SKS for a long time. The front sight is protected by a circle, I just surround the target with the circle and fire. It works well out to about 50 meters.

    I practice this method back in Brazil with my air rifle, snap shooting a 3 inch carbide cutting disk from 15 meters, it is very fast.

    I'm looking forward to practicing with the AK this month as I'm back in the US for a time. Mac
    "Then you will trample on the wicked; they will be ashes under the soles of your feet on the day when I act," says the Lord Almighty Mal 4:3

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  2. #22
    Im curious - just [edit] what diameter [/edit] does the AK front sight ring cover at 50 or 100 (or ?) yards?


    anyone know?
    Last edited by Rusty Phillips; 12-17-2006 at 03:17 AM.
    Anthony's threads "the car gun" http://www.warriortalk.com/showthread.php?t=8706 "black or white handguns" (covert or overt) http://www.warriortalk.com/showthread.php?t=10449
    "The BUG, redundant?" http://warriortalk.com/showthread.php?t=19332 "When a revolver beats a pistol" http://warriortalk.com/showthread.php?t=39445

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Round Rock, TX
    Posts
    5,421
    Just tried to paint my ChiCom AK and for some reason as soon as the bright orange paint touches the steel it turns brick red. Weird. So, I filled the dots on the flip up night sights on my Yugo and all I can say is WOW! The front sight is just wonderful but the rear dots may be too close and too small to be of use. I am really looking forward to running some drills with it this weekend.

    JC



    Quote Originally Posted by vlazlow
    Very cool stuff indeed.

    I am experimenting w/ painting the ring on the FSA day glow orange to help with quicker acquisition when the sight comes into the field of view. Kind of like a caveman simple 6.5 MOA red dot on the EOTECH.

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  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Pict
    I have been using a similar method with my SKS for a long time. The front sight is protected by a circle, I just surround the target with the circle and fire. It works well out to about 50 meters.

    I practice this method back in Brazil with my air rifle, snap shooting a 3 inch carbide cutting disk from 15 meters, it is very fast.

    I'm looking forward to practicing with the AK this month as I'm back in the US for a time. Mac
    Please let us know how it works!

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    154

    Default use white primer

    Quote Originally Posted by p17Enfield
    Just tried to paint my ChiCom AK and for some reason as soon as the bright orange paint touches the steel it turns brick red. Weird. So, I filled the dots on the flip up night sights on my Yugo and all I can say is WOW! The front sight is just wonderful but the rear dots may be too close and too small to be of use. I am really looking forward to running some drills with it this weekend.

    JC
    When I painted the site ears on my AK, I first used brush-on white primer. Putting a bright color on top of black causes the color to look darker, but if you put down a base coat of white primer first, the orange will appear brighter when you paint it on. I used Citadel brand wargaming lead miniatures white primer, followed by a coat of Testors model paint in bright yellow. The yellow really jumps out now.

    Hope this helps,
    John Justice
    Field Testing Engineer
    ACME - Weapons Division
    "ACME, the Name You Can Trust!"

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    726

    Default Sight Colors

    Of course, whatever works for you is fine, but I notice a number of people adding white to their sights for contrast.

    White and black (the original Russian sight color) do contrast well, until you have to shoot in winter conditions, fog and snow. White can then disappear, especially if it is on your front sight.

    Whatever color you choose, it should be light, so in dim light it does not tone down to a less visible color. It should also be a color that probably would not exist in your target environment. The bright orange, greens and yellows certainly come to mind for this.

    I removed my front sight post and cleaned it with rubbing alcohol. I then dipped only the top of it into fl. orange paint. After letting it dry over night hanging upside down, I reinserted it being careful not to chip off the paint.

    The first time I painted the rear of my front sight ring, it chipped off. I took a fine file, filed the rear of the sight gently to get to bare metal, and painted fl. yellow.

    With a 1/16" drill bit I made small depressions on each side of my (slightly widened) rear sight notch, up toward the top corner of each side of the cut. I filled these w/fl green. I did not make them so large as to catch my eye and interfere with front-sight-only fast sighting. These are oil based paints, not water based.

    I have done the same thing now to my SKSs and Mosin M44. All have similar sights so they are all similarly familiar.

    I have 58-year-old eyes and usually prefer optics, but this colored set up is more than adequate for the AK/SKS type shooting.

    CB3

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Columbia, SC
    Posts
    66
    I'm not generally a fan of painted sights; my Yugo M70 is an exception. As previously noted in this thread, the flip up night sight is just too much to resist! I used white auto body paint, from the local auto parts store, after degreasing thoroughly. Just dabbed a couple of coates into the circular recess on the front night sight.

    Best of both worlds! For bright lighting conditions, the standard sight, all black & zeroed at 100 yds. For low light, flip up the front sight & there's a bright white ball! Great for rapid acquisition at close range.

  8. #28
    I ended up going all orange ont he front sight hood and post. For whatever reason, my eyes can't pick up the bright green as well. The fact that the blazing FL sun on light green vegetation is common around here probably contributes to the factor, and white would wash out on the sand.

    Another thing I did was pain a vertical stripe under the notch in the rear sight. That way, if I see a horizontal black line between the post and notch, I know I'm aiming high, if the post is below the level of the top of the rear sight, I'm aiming low. Seems to be a good quick reference.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    548
    I am going to have to try painting my front sight now that I have ditched the EoTech. ACME, glad to see that there is another wargamer on WT. :D

    Decado

  10. #30
    I just got a bottle of ultra green from glow Inc.

    http://glowinc.com/detail.aspx?ID=41

    they have a section on how to paint the sight.. I will try it on some metal and see what it does this weekend.

    http://glowinc.com/glow-in-the-dark/gun-sights.aspx

    Bow, Rifle and Gun Sights

    Official Statement

    The owners of Glow Inc. support the legal and responsible ownership of weapons by both law enforcement and citizens. In the unfortunate scenario where there is a need to discharge a weapon, improved accuracy lowers the probability of injury to an innocent bystander. We feel that phosphorescent paint is a vital component of increasing this accuracy in dark environments. Your typical criminal will not take the effort or pay the cost to apply phosphorescent paint to his weapons. Therefore, we believe that making this information available is for the good of the community and hopefully will save a few innocent lives.

    Glow in the dark paint is a great way to improve nighttime visibility of rifle and gun sights. As with any weapon addition, we encourage you to educate yourself regarding the performance of the product in different situations. We encourage you to use the information on our website and to analyze the weapon for several days in different lighting conditions so that you know what to expect regardless of the environment.

    The only paint that we recommend using on a weapon is Ultra Green Glow in the Dark Paint. It is literally the brightest glow in the dark paint available anywhere. After charging from a bright light source, it will glow reasonable bright for about an hour. It will continue to glow, albeit dimly, for another 6-10 hours.

    An officer will typically enter lighted rooms throughout his shift, so the glow product performs well under these conditions.

    On the other hand, if your gun is in a dark locked box and you remove it at 2am in the dark, then your sights will not be visible.

    Painting Techniques for Guns and Rifles

    We suggest a 3 layered painting technique for optimum performance. If your gun or rifle has a clean gloss white paint on the sights, then you can leave it there and move on to the glow layer instructions.

    Remove all paint from the site area, clean thoroughly and allow to dry.

    Add a base layer of bright white, high gloss paint. I suggest inexpensive nail polish, but any solvent or water based acrylic will work. Allow the paint to dry between every layer.

    Add a layer or more of Ultra Green Glow in the Dark Paint.

    Coat with a sealer layer of clear solvent-based paint without any UV filtering additives. Once again, I suggest inexpensive clear nail polish. Some people opt for the more advanced clear coat that is manufactured to be resistant to gun cleaning solution.

    Properly painted, the glow properties should last over 10 years with nominal degredation.

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