SI 2014 Training
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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Sonoran Desert
    Posts
    1,190
    Thank you so much to everyone!

    It was an honor to virtually get my neck broken by Sonny, and now I have a picture to go along with it!

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Northern VA
    Posts
    344
    Guys,

    The quality of these pictures taken by Gary are unbelievable. The equipment he used was the latest, most incredible stuff. Not to mention the composition, focus for effect.

    Just absolutely fantastic work!

    He took almost 1000 pictures!!!!
    AKs and Glocks, and now Gas Piston ARs - 'Nuff said.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Sonoran Desert
    Posts
    1,190
    There is no doubt about it, that small tease of photos obviously shows the literally professional quality!

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Northern VA
    Posts
    344
    Oh....I forgot to say how incredibly awesome this class was. I am not as eloquent as crebralfix in my review, but those of you fortunate enough to take the class in October are in for some cutting edge material.

    Gabe and Mrs. Suarez were the supreme hosts and the foundation that was laid down for us to build on was great. This was my 2nd class from Gabe (CRG in March).

    This was my first time taking instruction from Paul. He did a great job and was very thorough and is a wealth of knowledge regarding the history and use of an AK.

    Sonny was very impressive. This man knows how to take care of business - that's all I will say. It is painfully obvious that Sonny is, not just an artist at what he knows, but a very seasoned practitioner in dealing with the enemy.

    I also met some really great folks and had a tremendous amount of fun. I look forward to the next one.
    AKs and Glocks, and now Gas Piston ARs - 'Nuff said.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,423

    Default Reliability

    As Gabe says: "AKs and Glocks"

    I was a deviant in the class with a 1911. It certainly did NOT perform well with 4 failures to feed. This is the second class in which this occurred. The gun works fine every time I test it at the range. Must be Mr. Murphy. In the future, I'll only take Glocks to training :)

    I think the 1911 really is a gun for shooters, not fighters. Someone on the 1911 Forum commented that "the 1911 is an aficionado's gun." Perhaps it is time to move on (I know...blasphemy)!

    ***
    After this class, I have lots of respect for the AK system of rifles. It focuses upon simplicity. I found it very easy to use, especially for a left handed person.

    Furthermore, my eyes have been opened regarding training. It seems to me that the American gun culture has ossified to the point that any deviation from standard format is deemed unworthy, unsafe, and not worth the time.

    This is certainly not the case with this class. In fact, one of the major lessons in the class was to keep your mind open and explore. Challenge the standard notions of training. Experiment with different techniques and test using force-on-force. In fact, it seems to me that most defensive classes are just *shooting* classes; they are not *fighting* classes.

    We're training to fight, are we not? I certainly am.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,423

    Default In retrospect...

    The last few drills involved introducing stress into our live fire drills. We had to perform with rounds going downrange from slightly behind us. I distinctly remember the blast of several rounds coming several feet from behind my left shoulder as I fumbled a reload. The best way to make this go away was to finish the reload and engage the target. I did so with motivated alacrity. The terrorist with the claymore and deadman switch was totally perforated by 30 caliber bullets.
    I want to draw attention to this part of my review for discussion. Many folks will have a big problem with this in terms of "gun safety." It's not that I was shot at; I was shot "by". Meaning: I felt the muzzle blast, but the bullets were passing by me several feet away. At no point did I feel threatened and I had trust that the instructors were proficient enough to avoid any real danger. My glands certainly didn't dump adrenaline into my system. It was more...mentally motivating by way of intensity in focus on my activities.

    I actually found the experience to be beneficial. It's not like I feel that I have been in a gun fight; quite the opposite. More like...there's nothing really to be afraid of if the person next to you is competent and aware of their gun's position. Of course, certain precautions need to be taken and safety rules followed for most situations. No exaggerated reaction from me is required, as mandated by our gun safety culture. Perhaps this is the key: we (as the gun culture) have become too rigid in order to accomodate the least competent shooters. I can certainly understand this need, but perhaps any extreme has its disadvantages and prevents any wiggling.

    In case you hadn't noticed, I've been really thinking about how I've been training. Many of the techniques I use are dictated by range rules. I think these limitations are preventing me from achieving the next level.

    Anyone have any thoughts on either of the ideas presented here?

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    2,606
    On the live rounds close-by concept. I did someting similar with my brother. He is a police sniper and I was shooting with him one day as he was firing his shots. He was doing really well that day. We had the range to ourselves. I asked him if he could do the same with lots of distraction.

    We set it up that he was prone and I was kneeling next to him with my AK. I fired a full mag, rapid fire and he had to print a five shot group before I finished the mag. Of course I was aiming at the mud out in front of his target so all sorts of stuff would be flying up in his sight picture. I only heard two of his shots and I thought I had him. He had fired the other three in unison with some of mine. His group was just as tight, too. He said it was a good exercise and forced him to focus on the task at hand. Mac
    "Then you will trample on the wicked; they will be ashes under the soles of your feet on the day when I act," says the Lord Almighty Mal 4:3

    My YouTube Channel

  8. #38
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    757
    Quote Originally Posted by crebralfix
    As Gabe says: "AKs and Glocks"

    I was a deviant in the class with a 1911. It certainly did NOT perform well with 4 failures to feed. This is the second class in which this occurred. The gun works fine every time I test it at the range. Must be Mr. Murphy. In the future, I'll only take Glocks to training :)

    I think the 1911 really is a gun for shooters, not fighters. Someone on the 1911 Forum commented that "the 1911 is an aficionado's gun." Perhaps it is time to move on (I know...blasphemy)!

    ***
    After this class, I have lots of respect for the AK system of rifles. It focuses upon simplicity. I found it very easy to use, especially for a left handed person.

    Furthermore, my eyes have been opened regarding training. It seems to me that the American gun culture has ossified to the point that any deviation from standard format is deemed unworthy, unsafe, and not worth the time.

    This is certainly not the case with this class. In fact, one of the major lessons in the class was to keep your mind open and explore. Challenge the standard notions of training. Experiment with different techniques and test using force-on-force. In fact, it seems to me that most defensive classes are just *shooting* classes; they are not *fighting* classes.

    We're training to fight, are we not? I certainly am.
    Be careful there, Brother. The lords of the gunfighting industry have little tolerance for such truths laid bare and echoed by disciples of iconoclasts such as Gabe and Mr. Puzikas. I'm very envious.

    Thanks for all the pics and posts. Keep 'em coming.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Pirates have No Borders
    Posts
    33,805
    Great picture. I could not get the yahoo ones to work for me. I am hoping to get a few more from some of the other guys and I'll post them when I do.

    Sonny and Paul and I have been in discussions already on how to make it better for October.

    "It seems to me that the American gun culture has ossified to the point that any deviation from standard format is deemed unworthy, unsafe, and not worth the time."
    That is one of the most profound things I have read from a student on this forum and emminently true. Go to the majority of academies around the nation and the material they are doing is merely bullseye shooting. It is a combat-flavored sport-based effort to empower those who come with the question of how to win a fight. Knowing little, the student leaves clinging to that which empowered him and another zealot is born.

    No exaggerated reaction from me is required, as mandated by our gun safety culture. Perhaps this is the key: we (as the gun culture) have become too rigid in order to accomodate the least competent shooters.


    A certain rigidity is needed when teaching beginners...or "newbies". But like Musashi's boat, many of those precautions don't need to be dragged with you on your back after you get accross the river.

    Gun rules, any rules, are simply formulated by men. None of them are holy or anything like that. In fact, many of the old time gunmen didn't go along with many of the perceived "norms" of today. These "norms" are merely crystalized opinions...and opinions are like noses. You know the rest, but the point is that not all noses arte alike, nor is one nose better than another.

    Many of the techniques I use are dictated by range rules. I think these limitations are preventing me from achieving the next level.

    Very true. If only the majority of the gun culture would test their skills via force on force we would see a complete change in the way things are done. But to change one needs to realize there is imperfection, and that is hard for some to accept.
    Gabe Suarez

    Warrior Talk Blog
    Tactical Gear For The Civilian Fighter
    Training For The Martial Civilian

    "The Best Way To Predict The Future Is To Create It"

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tampa
    Posts
    17,861
    Great Photos Lumino!!! I also could not access the yahoo photos!!:(

    Those photos have me eating my heart out!!!! What a blast it must have been.

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