Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 50
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    483
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    I'm not a big fan of stashing stuff in a work place where one doesn't have 100% control over your desk, locker, office, etc. Even if you have an office with a key, management/janitorial staff still have access. All it takes is one nosey co-worker or janitor looking in the wrong spot at the wrong time and you're looking for a new job. Not to mention when something goes in a drawer or hiding spot, it can often be forgotten until particularly inconvenient circumstances.

    Luck plays into this a lot. In many years of working in many places, to my knowledge I've never had someone look through my desk, locker, etc. But I don't KNOW that it's never happened. Were I to stash something it damn well would be difficult to find, but bad luck happens.

    Personal security and ability to project force is important...we discuss that stuff every day! But keeping an income is also part of our security plan and quality of life. These have to be balanced. I am NOT saying don't be armed, but am saying that the office environment poses unique challenges.

    Stashing an item has it's place but in my mind that is more about proactive, nefarious purpose rather than every day defense in an office.



    If self-preservation is something that's important to us, we find a way to keep the right tools on our body.

    One thing I use a lot is "lap top carry". This is different from purse carry, even though it may seem the same, and it's easy to accomplish in many places. It is NOT the same thing as carrying on the body and is utterly useless for most personal protection scenarios. It's only a viable thing for things that are pretty unlikely...but, it's potentially a lot of firepower right next to your feet under the desk. Use the imagination.
    If you secure it in your own lockbox, small safe, etc. that you only have the key/code to, you reduce the concern for someone getting in.

    It is just an option....

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Anthony View Post
    I bought my girlfriend a PHLSTER Enigma holster for her G43, and it's amazing for concealment. Doesn't require a belt, completely disappears even in yoga pants and a tank top. If I was a girl, this is what I'd have.


    This. I am a woman, and yes, this is what I have. Nothing else has worked for me, either being too bulky or requiring a full change to my outer clothing. This can be worn with no large over belt required. It can be concealed beneath almost anything even beyond pants. There are loads of videos to get the fit just right too. Straight up full concealment.
    I pace the shallow sea, walking the time between, reflecting on the type of fossil Id like to be."

    -Ann Zwinger


    ~**I Axolotl questions**~

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    15,830
    Quote Originally Posted by Sharkbite View Post
    www.flashbangstore.com

    NPE possibilites.
    The Ole Heifer carries a Glock 42 (380) in one. She started with a Ruger LCP them moved up. Would like to get a Model 43 (9mm) when money is available. She likes it.
    I rather you hated me for who I am than love me for who I ain't!
    This Ain't the Movies, and You Ain't John Wayne!

    Sometimes it is entirely appropriate to kill a fly with a 12 pound sledgehammer!
    TRAIN HARD= SOONER OR LATER YOU"LL NEED IT!

  4. #14
    Another thing to consider about the NPE....would discovery of the firearm also result in criminal charges? A lot of NPEs (public schools, government offices, etc) carry felony penalties for violation. Hard to provide for your family when you're unemployed AND incarcerated. You have to make that decision for yourself.....

    I would also add a good flashlight that could double as an impact tool. I like the Streamlight ProTac 2LX. Puts out decent light while letting you hit sensitive spots with considerable force. Uses CR123 or rechargeable batteries, too.



    Sent from my SM-G715A using Tapatalk

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Exiled in Texas
    Posts
    7,348
    On the political/legal side of things:

    Different offices have different issues, and some are more approachable than others. I'm guessing that she's working within a hospital or some other large medical group. If she thinks it might work, she could approach HR and ask how they have dealt with past threats to ensure the safety of employees. She could put something in writing, informing them of specific threats that she perceives and asking how they will provide her with safety. She could formally request an armed escort to her car every evening. Big companies with HR departments don't like getting letters like that, because they know that it's a set-up for a lawsuit. The negative, though, is that they could then start looking for some way to peaceably get rid of her before the lawsuit comes.

    On the practical side of things:

    If she has the ability to put her own furniture into her office, she could add a small cabinet with an out-of-view pistol vault. It would only be a cache; not an immediately accessible tool. But if she had some forewarning, she could get to it. At worst, someone might spot the pistol vault, but they couldn't prove that it contained a pistol. This is a very imperfect option, but another option to throw into the mix.

    If she really wants to carry a gun, she can make it happen. There are a few choices that could work: G43, P365, S&W 642. Others here have offered some ideas on holsters, but a lot of it will come back to clothes. For women, making the decision to radically alter their wardrobe to accommodate a gun is often a step too far for them. If she carries, and she ever gets a curious question from a colleague, she needs to have the fortitude to embrace the lie. Confide in no one. If pointedly asked if she carries, deny, deny, deny. They're never going to attempt to force a professional woman to submit to a frisk. So regardless of how clearly she knows that she printed, she should just deny it.

    Even the criminal penalties are seldom as terrible as people make out. In Phoenix, what prosecutor is really going to get excited about prosecuting a woman for carrying a gun after she's been threatened by the crazy people that she's trying to help? I don't practice law in Arizona, and you can never bank on this stuff, but I'd wager that the likely criminal sanction is losing the gun and paying a shyster like me a few thousand dollars to make it go away. That's the risk. Not jail time. Not a felony conviction. The realistic risk for her is far less than most people will assume. Is it worth risking the loss of a pistol and a few grand? To me, it would be.
    Virtute et Armis

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Chandler, Arizona
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by Badger View Post
    If you secure it in your own lockbox, small safe, etc. that you only have the key/code to, you reduce the concern for someone getting in.

    It is just an option....
    In most offices, the employer has the right to search everywhere in the office even if a container is locked.
    KWTL Feb 2022

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    15,830
    Quote Originally Posted by Ragsbo View Post
    The Ole Heifer carries a Glock 42 (380) in one. She started with a Ruger LCP them moved up. Would like to get a Model 43 (9mm) when money is available. She likes it.
    Want to add, you do have to "dress around" it. Some tops are too tight, and dresses might require you lift your skirt to your armpits to get at gun. ALSO it helps to be well endowed (as the ole heifer is) to help make the space for it
    I rather you hated me for who I am than love me for who I ain't!
    This Ain't the Movies, and You Ain't John Wayne!

    Sometimes it is entirely appropriate to kill a fly with a 12 pound sledgehammer!
    TRAIN HARD= SOONER OR LATER YOU"LL NEED IT!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Lower Golden State
    Posts
    209
    You've only mentioned .gov...is that city, county, state or federal? Law Dog minimizes the prosecuting of such discoveries, but it seems to vary with who she's really working for. .Fed seemingly more 'vindictive'. Any bare-handed/chemical stuff needs continual practice...and still may incur consequences. especially if the offender survives and gets lawyered up. My better half embraced the training and woman-specific gear but does not work in an environment where she could be scanned, searched of outed by a fool office 'karen'. That pretty much negates the stashing concept. 'Prolly best to pin down HR, diplomatically, so as not to paint herself with a red flag. Prayers sent for her finding the right balance and personal safety. How did they do it during the covid?...Zoom Meetings!
    DVC...and distance from disorder

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    483
    Quote Originally Posted by AZRiding View Post
    In most offices, the employer has the right to search everywhere in the office even if a container is locked.
    This is simply not true. You have a reasonable expectation of privacy in your private possessions such as a purse, lunch box, personally owned file folder, etc.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,183
    Rights, no rights, what SHOULD be and what IS are different things.

    Stashing items can make sense for some things and there are certainly things one could do to minimize the chances if detection.

    But no way in hell would I leave a firearm in an office when I do not have full control to who can access it. Others have office keys, others have desk keys. And of course one can deny, but if something is suspicious it can damage your career.

    Also, the more secure it is, the slower it is to access.

    If self defense is important to someone, they will figure out how to carry on the body. Full stop.

    Bag carry is not ideal but it still beats something locked in a drawer left overnight. Slower than on-body but faster than unlocking a hidden box.

    A firearm in a bag should be secured so that it doesn’t fall out by mistake at an in opportune time.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •