Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 59
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    6,024

    Default AAR: Urban Warfare Weekend with Greg Nichols

    Just got in, most of the rest either still in transit or back to work. I'll have more to say about this later (likely a day or two at the least), so I will for now open this thread with a two word summary of the class:

    EXCELLENT. Simply Excellent.

    (Okay, three words...)
    Si vis pacem, para violentus.

    "Hard pressed on my right; my left is in retreat. My center is yielding. Impossible to maneuver. Situation excellent. I am attacking."--Marshall Foch

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,338
    The guy is clearly schizophrenic, at least four personalities.

    Nichols the comedian.
    Nichols the redneck.
    Nichols the door kicker.
    Nichols the instructor.

    Each of those is distinctly different from the other. Experiencing him, for example, in only one of the first two roles one might not predict how smoothly he performs in the instructor mode. Seemingly different people.

    The emphasis in this class was very different from the other times I have taken it (Note that each was good and valuable). Much emphasis on flow, almost continuous movement, developing a great awareness of ones teammates and being able to instantly do whatever they needed or the situation needed at that moment. How working with teammates was very fluid, no one having fixed roles and anyone being able to fill any needed function and seamlessly flowing from role/need to role/need in any instant as the situation required.

    Returning home tonight I have been discussing the material with my son, he said these were the same concepts that he was teaching and doing in the USMC until he left there in 2007. Son felt these were better than some other methods such as that of British marines whom he sometimes trained with.

    Further, I shall never think of mayonnaise the same again.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    2,870
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hatfield View Post
    The guy is clearly schizophrenic, at least four personalities.
    "If you don't believe me, you can even ask me."
    Waitin' for a squeeze...

    TWOTU Since March 2012

    DPS
    CRG
    AR15/M4 RGF
    HRO-6 CQB
    HRO-7 Team Tactics
    HITS-8 Knife


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    10,486
    IDK what you mean..... Neither do I
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    10,486
    I will be putting my comments and thoughts up shortly. Just getting back to work today and traveled yesterday so I'm playing catch-up. Great group of guys and awesome facility.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    6,024
    I needed another perspective on CQB and 'working' in and through buildings. I had before now been through HRO-6 twice--both of those were focused on individual actions within enclosed environments and took a different approach to those actions. I knew that Greg took a different direction and that I needed to get his perspective on this to fill in the gaps in my knowledge-base (I use that term specifically because I can't say that this is yet a fully-developed skill-set at this time). I was therefore delighted to find that he was inclined to drop himself into my AO and conduct training.

    Before meeting Greg I had no doubt that he would be a competent and knowledgeable instructor as far as the subject matter goes. Certain aspects of his public persona were, however, somewhat...suspicious....

    Didn't have to worry about anything, though (Either that or what I was afraid of was not displayed in my presence...maybe some of those who went out to find food with him in the evenings can report just to be sure?). Greg brought real-world experience and a thinking man's approach to the subject of fighting with walls and furniture everywhere and winning while you're doing it. He knows not just what he's doing but also how to start others on the way to knowing what they're doing and that is the important thing, isn't it?

    Day one started with introductions and short briefings about content and path of the class and sundry safety and administrative things. First after that was individual action within a room. This served to get us used to the terminology Greg would be using throughout and brought us up on the way he wanted us to move at all times.

    Beginning the evening of the first day and continuing throughout the course additional members were added to the entry group. Pairs, the foundation of team entry, were introduced. Over the next two days a third and fourth and fifth were added and so on until walk-throughs were being done with all nine students in the class. In all cases the movement was the same as when working alone but the tempo and speed of movement varied as others were added to the mix.

    The second day started late in order to work a few hours without light sources other than what we had available. White light, use of chem sticks, weapon-mounted lights, how bright the lights should be and how specifically they should be used were covered. One attendee had a 3rd-gen NVG which we all sampled (I was able to shoot with it the first night after the day's class was done with a suppress pistol. Thank you, J.) Game changer, guys, game changer and that's all I'll say on that.

    As things went along we discussed weapons, accessories, support gear. This varied with the students between 9mm pistols (me, an MA 30DMG with folding AR tube and KAK shockwave) and AR pistols and rifles (one or two SBRs), one AUG and one 556R. Setups on the weapons were considered. (I altered the setup on my AR-P after getting Greg's advice on it though I did not use that in any of the training.) Chest rigs, vests, belts, and shoulder bags were all present and considered and discussed. Basically, short is Good when working in rooms.

    The third day started with a little work with tourniquets and discussion of in-the-fight casualty treatment (basically, fix what's killing them and get them out if you can). Means of evacuating a casualty by yourself and with help were reviewed and demonstrated. One of the students is an EMT and added his valuable input to this. Next was a section on how to defend a structure that was quite interesting indeed. Then it was back to clearing.

    Weather precluded the night-shoot familiarization that was to have been done the second evening and live-fire work the third day. That was in no way an impediment or loss as far as either Greg's presentation or our instruction was concerned. The best instruction I've received has been done without a shot being fired and this was no exception. Greg adjusted to changed conditions on the fly and had way more than enough material to run us three more days without a shot being fired.

    Brief takeaways from the course include but are not limited to:

    There is a difference between the law enforcement approach to clearing and the military approach to clearing. Neither one is necessarily bad. Both have strengths, both have drawbacks. Everybody else I'm aware of so far goes with the LE approach in training. Greg brings the military approach which is something I, especially, need to see and be exposed to.

    If you're by yourself and you don't have to go anywhere or do anything against hostile or possible hostile action, don't.

    Inside buildings especially, the ambush rules.

    Deliberate
    speed is life. Speed varies, but as a rule of thumb the faster you can move the better off you will be.

    CQB is a chess game that one or the other of you will need to cheat at. You have to be able to think on your feet and at speed. You can't afford to just cruise through it on automatic.

    Working in teams: Two to clear a room. If you have more than two it depends on whether it's an odd or even number what else you can do. Ideally you want multiples of two. And they're always moving.

    First man through a door has to DECIDE and COMMIT. Second (and after) has to OBSERVE and ADAPT.

    There can be no specialist in the entry teams. Anybody in the stack will at some point become the first man through if you're flowing correctly. Anybody will be the second or third or... if you're flowing correctly. You must be able to slide on the move into any position and any role.

    (Personal) I've got to get myself weaned of the impulse to muzzle strike with the 30DMG every time after closing on a contact. It's too much fun.

    I'm not someone who waxes enthusiastic in a sense about learning opportunities like this. Where someone else would say, "It's awesome," I say it's interesting. Ladies and gentlemen, this stuff is INTERESTING to me and entirely too useful to everyone that lives and works in places like I do to pass up if you get a chance to attend. Please, for your own development as a dangerous person, do not forgo this kind of training.

    As for Greg Nichols--EXCELLENT instruction by an EXCELLENT instructor.

    In other ways...still a little...suspicious...

    Visuals will be coming. Be a few more days at most. I've got to do make-some-money stuff first.
    Last edited by CR Williams; 11-04-2015 at 09:01 AM.
    Si vis pacem, para violentus.

    "Hard pressed on my right; my left is in retreat. My center is yielding. Impossible to maneuver. Situation excellent. I am attacking."--Marshall Foch

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    6,024

    Default Some pictures, more to come

    Da Crew.jpg

    For those who are worried about being too old or broke for this kind of effort:

    Mark H.jpg

    Mark, I'm guessing, is older than I am and I'm within 15 days of sixty years. We both rolled through pretty freakin' nicely, I think.

    Jus chillin.jpg

    We be chillin'.
    Si vis pacem, para violentus.

    "Hard pressed on my right; my left is in retreat. My center is yielding. Impossible to maneuver. Situation excellent. I am attacking."--Marshall Foch

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1
    Awesome class, fantastic instructor!

    I am looking forward to my next training opportunity with Greg. On the drive home my training partner and I, hands down, agreed we want to train with Greg more. I'm sure there are more funny stories inside that 5 foot something stick of dynamite.

    Quick summary... This is a class to build your tactical and warrior mindset, not give you trigger time. This class is all about strengthening your skill with your most valuable weapon! It may sound corny, but my huge take-away from this was a practical application of something Bruce Lee said, to paraphrase; you have to flow like water, if the river bends, then you bend. You have to dynamically ACT and be explosive in that action.

    The only thing that could make this more interesting and perhaps reinforce some of the lessons taught and learned, would be to integrate a FOF component.

    I'm sure I'll think of other cliche (but true) shit to write, and if I do... Well I'm on warriortalk now so... You all get to read it.

    Thanks again to CR for getting this class kicked off, thank you to the other attendees. (I remember all your names, I promise, just excluding them because I don't want to piss anyone off and I don't know their handles yet.). But most of all thank you Greg. I'll forgive you for your 1911 comment... Eventually.
    Last edited by Dicesm; 11-03-2015 at 05:23 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,338
    Yes, CR, I am distinctly older than thou. Oddly, the usual old injuries weren't bothering me during this class though a newer one was. I firmly believe that changing my home exercise program to more in line as has been recommended on this forum noticeably improved my function and endurance throughout the three days.

    I received no form of imbursement for that endorsement of benefits received from perusing this forum.

    And, CR Thanks for the photos.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    10,486
    Honestly guys, FoF as a follow up would be a whole other class. Shit I may put out a UTM class with a 6&7 or mashup pre-req
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •