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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    1,401
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    Having the entire thing NP3d at the store will go a long way to keeping it rust free...just saying
    Agreed!

  2. #42
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    NWFL
    Posts
    16,581
    Quote Originally Posted by Jons999 View Post
    I would say a stainless 12ga would be my go to. US federal firearms laws apply to you in United States waters and international waters. But if you to sail to say, Mexican waters, you would not only be subject to their laws, you could be arrested by US agents for illegally exporting a firearm. So if you’re talking about a boat big enough for ocean trips I would say handgun in a well hidden storage compartment.
    The laws may have changed and I knew people that did. It used to be you could declare it to customs and they might hold it until you left port or might seize it. The laws may now be different. I see no good reason to visit mexico as it now is. In mexico today, only the sheep are unarmed.
    Even if it is legal, do not invest in too expensive a gun because it may be taken by customs and not given back if they like it.
    Nicaragua has very bad reputation for their coast guard robbing any boats passing by of supplies.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    ME
    Posts
    79

    Default The proper weapon for boat defense

    I work for CBP… and really can see only three reasons we would seize a weapon; NFA/GCA violation, stolen gun, or the owner is restricted from possessing one. Even not declaring it could become a little bit of a hassle, but if one of those three are not met… it will likely be leaving with you.

    Floating into Mexican waters doesn’t necessarily mean you “exported” the firearm. Biggest thing is intent. Did you make land? Did you hang out with foreign nationals (coming from foreign) on the water? If not, it isn’t any different than someone lost, who crossed the border, and was spun around by Canada or just took the U-turn before their Customs building… which is about 50 yards into Canada. I don’t think we could even push the export part, as they didn’t make a meaningful departure.

    Holding a firearm at a port might be something a specific location did on their own accord (speaking for US, as I think barnetmill was talking about foreign ports), but we only do it for L/E leaving the country on a specific trip. Last time, ME Fish & Wildlife had to grab some test results from a lab in Fredericton, NB… put sidearms in a gun box, with a copy of their IDs (in case I wasn’t around when they got back), and they grabbed them once they were done. We’ve had travelers ask about it before, but it just isn’t done due to liability (tort claims for damage, since we don’t have the area to store them… guns can be expensive).

    If it is a gun you are worried about, go to a port and ask to have a CBP Form 4457 filled out for it/them. Pretty much it is a Customs form that shows you are in possession of X property prior to exiting the US… so if it is declared on return, it shows you did not acquire it outside the US. Mainly for not having to pay duty, but it makes it easier for firearms, especially when it is a situation an ATF Form 6 isn’t needed for the travel. Hunters going abroad fill them out, to include scopes/optics. Requires an officer to confirm the serial number (we just go out to the vehicle to look), and being we put our name on it… confirm there isn’t an NCIC hit on it. You put your name/address, and once signed/stamped by us, it’s proof of ownership until you sell it or move.

    That being said, in all the times I’ve dealt with firearms, I’ve only seized one… and it was one of two rifles that a hunter was declaring on a 4457.

    He was an FFL out of NY, and bought a Remington 700 at a gunshow a few years back. Gave all the info, confirmed the serial numbers… NCIC hit on the one gun. Usually, you’ll see it with older guns (4 digit numbers), and can rule it out based on specifics being different (caliber, make, type). Not this time… 7mm, but had a scope listed that was different from what was on the gun (did not come with a scope, owner put it on after he got it, and we had him pull it off prior to leaving). Hit was from 1979.

    Was turned over to local PD, which the Detective contacted the originating agency, who tried to find next of kin to see if they even wanted the firearm. If not, it would be taken out of the system and he could take possession of it. Guy continued on his hunting trip, and gave him a number to check with the PD upon return to see if he could grab it on the way home. Been meaning to ask the Detective about it, but haven’t seen her.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    NWFL
    Posts
    16,581
    Quote Originally Posted by Screwball View Post
    I work for CBP… and really can see only three reasons we would seize a weapon; NFA/GCA violation, stolen gun, or the owner is restricted from possessing one. Even not declaring it could become a little bit of a hassle, but if one of those three are not met… it will likely be leaving with you.

    Floating into Mexican waters doesn’t necessarily mean you “exported” the firearm. Biggest thing is intent. Did you make land? Did you hang out with foreign nationals (coming from foreign) on the water? If not, it isn’t any different than someone lost, who crossed the border, and was spun around by Canada or just took the U-turn before their Customs building… which is about 50 yards into Canada. I don’t think we could even push the export part, as they didn’t make a meaningful departure.

    Holding a firearm at a port might be something a specific location did on their own accord (speaking for US, as I think barnetmill was talking about foreign ports), but we only do it for L/E leaving the country on a specific trip. Last time, ME Fish & Wildlife had to grab some test results from a lab in Fredericton, NB… put sidearms in a gun box, with a copy of their IDs (in case I wasn’t around when they got back), and they grabbed them once they were done. We’ve had travelers ask about it before, but it just isn’t done due to liability (tort claims for damage, since we don’t have the area to store them… guns can be expensive).

    If it is a gun you are worried about, go to a port and ask to have a CBP Form 4457 filled out for it/them. Pretty much it is a Customs form that shows you are in possession of X property prior to exiting the US… so if it is declared on return, it shows you did not acquire it outside the US. Mainly for not having to pay duty, but it makes it easier for firearms, especially when it is a situation an ATF Form 6 isn’t needed for the travel. Hunters going abroad fill them out, to include scopes/optics. Requires an officer to confirm the serial number (we just go out to the vehicle to look), and being we put our name on it… confirm there isn’t an NCIC hit on it. You put your name/address, and once signed/stamped by us, it’s proof of ownership until you sell it or move.

    That being said, in all the times I’ve dealt with firearms, I’ve only seized one… and it was one of two rifles that a hunter was declaring on a 4457.

    He was an FFL out of NY, and bought a Remington 700 at a gunshow a few years back. Gave all the info, confirmed the serial numbers… NCIC hit on the one gun. Usually, you’ll see it with older guns (4 digit numbers), and can rule it out based on specifics being different (caliber, make, type). Not this time… 7mm, but had a scope listed that was different from what was on the gun (did not come with a scope, owner put it on after he got it, and we had him pull it off prior to leaving). Hit was from 1979.

    Was turned over to local PD, which the Detective contacted the originating agency, who tried to find next of kin to see if they even wanted the firearm. If not, it would be taken out of the system and he could take possession of it. Guy continued on his hunting trip, and gave him a number to check with the PD upon return to see if he could grab it on the way home. Been meaning to ask the Detective about it, but haven’t seen her.
    Yes I was referring to foreign ports and their customs and how it was some years ago.
    I lived for a short time in the Annapolis. MD area and there were a lot of sail boats and other craft that made long voyages. I was told that guns could be listed as part of the equipment of a private vessel. Again I am not sure what that entailed and if it is still valid today.
    I stopped in one gunshop there in about '95 and there were two M60 machine guns for sale for $9,000 dollars each that I was told they would sell for $8,000. The manager or owner there, also a local cop, said that there were yachts cruising the Caribbean with belt fed machine guns then and it was legal. In past years in latin america it you were important, wealthy, and connected you tended be treated by a different standard.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Sparks, NV
    Posts
    270
    Everyone on our boats carried a sidearm, and either a shotgun or M4 ... We also had a twin 50 in the front of the boat ... Sometimes some M60's as well mounted on both sides towards the back.


    American Veteran and Patriot, Lover of God, Country and Family. No Regrets, No Bullshit


  6. #46
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    In a positive state of mind
    Posts
    4,136
    Quote Originally Posted by USN-PO2 View Post
    Everyone on our boats carried a sidearm, and either a shotgun or M4 ... We also had a twin 50 in the front of the boat ... Sometimes some M60's as well mounted on both sides towards the back.
    Were those boats PBRs by any chance?

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Sparks, NV
    Posts
    270
    Yep, but they were in the Mississippi River on the west bank of Naw'lans back in 1982/83

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    5,170
    Quote Originally Posted by USN-PO2 View Post
    Yep, but they were in the Mississippi River on the west bank of Naw'lans back in 1982/83
    "You just get me close to my
    destination and I'll cut you and the crew loose."
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I rode the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer (as modified)

    "What cannot be remedied must be endured."

    Vale et omnia quae.

    P:20

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    887
    Quote Originally Posted by Papa View Post
    "You just get me close to my
    destination and I'll cut you and the crew loose."
    Never get out of the boat...

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Prescott
    Posts
    110
    When i used to live back in West Palm Beach, FL we would travel to the just outside of Bahamian waters to go fishing and pirates were a serious concern back then. My dad kept a stainless mini-14 with a bunch of mags with green tip. We also had his semi auto FNAR in 308win. I brought along a 20inch AR and a benelli Super black eagle with an Extended tube loaded with copper plated 3.5 inch buckshot. So we had all the engagement distances covered.

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