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  1. #1

    Default Restoring a Burned Handgun

    I've heard that if a gun has been in a fire, such as a house fire, it should not be restored and fired. Is this correct?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by grnzbra View Post
    I've heard that if a gun has been in a fire, such as a house fire, it should not be restored and fired. Is this correct?
    Depends how bad and where the damage is. Basically it comes down to the metallurgy being compromised of parts meant to sustain pressure

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  3. #3
    Thank you for the clarification.
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  4. #4
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    When we get weapons in the lab that have been in a fire, we will test fire them using either a primed cartridge case or remote fire. I've never had a fire damaged weapon blow up, but I have colleagues in the field that have had it happen. As ShopMonkey has said, it is due to the unknown temps the weapon was exposed to and this can change the hardness of the metal. I honestly know of no cost effective way to prove that the metal hasnt been compromised, and most insurance companies will pay out for fire damage if there is any indication that the firearm may have been damaged in a fire.

  5. #5
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    A house fire in a bricked fašade home is like an oven and temperatures can easily reach over 1000 F. I took some guns I was given from a house fire and my gunsmith said no. There was a divorce and that fire was likely set. Most is not all of those guns had rounds in the chamber. That is how some people store guns, even when cased.
    He did keep a .22 barrel for some sort of stock material since he is always making odds and ends. he determined that one barrel was from a remington nylon 66 and the barrel was all that was left. Another fellow did bring him a rifle in 220 swift that had been in a truck fire and he straightened the barrel enough to satisfy the customer. It was shot with iron sights. The barrels can warp. I think it was a ruger bolt gun and this was at least 30 years ago. I guess he thought the action was ok. I would be dubious myself about such an action in .220 swift.

  6. #6
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    The only way I would restore a firearm that had been in a fire is when the firearm had special sentimental meaning. AND then it would be only to restore it to look like it did before the fire but NOT to be shot. (Say it was your great grandpa's rifle he used to fight off the Injuns! Something to hang on the wall and tell stories about)
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  7. #7
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    You can restore it to be a wall hanger, otherwise see if you can sell it at a gun buy back program.

  8. #8
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    My understanding is that if the springs in the action have lost tension you know the gun got hot enough to lose strength in the metal. I believe it is possible to have the parts re-heat treated, but that along with the rest of the restoration would exceed the value of the majority of guns. Some custom engravers will anneal the weapon first to make it easier to engrave, then heat treat after. Although most high end engraved guns don’t see much serious shooting time either.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Bond View Post
    see if you can sell it at a gun buy back program.

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