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  1. #1
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    Nov 2008
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    Default The best draw method for a defensive folder?

    Iíve been training with folders since the 90ís, own Gabeís DVD on the subject and trained with SI back when they were partnered with Janichís MBC.

    Ive read, watched and trained with other names in the blade world as well.

    While not an expert, Iím hardly a ďnewbĒ.

    This variation on the 110 Quick Draw concept is the best that Iíve found for the martialist, as it has the blade sit deeper in the holster (sheath) and prevents the blade from coming out unintentionally mid brawl. To say that it is faster than a knife with the Wave feature is an understatement.

    I made a vid about it for my guys, and made it public. Even cleaned up the profanity a bit. Hence the audio dropping out briefly.

    Let me know what you think. There is no financial incentive for me in this. Iím just trying to push defensive blade use by good guys into 21st Century. What made sense for dualists in Filipino provinces back in the 70ís & 80ís isnít exactly appropriate at your local gas station. And by appropriate, I primarily mean effective.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2dUM00iNb1s&t=80s
    Last edited by judomayhem; 09-25-2021 at 09:27 AM.
    "He who can handle the quickest rate of change survives."

    -Col John Boyd

    "Only he is lost who gives himself up for lost"

    -Hans-Ulrich Rudel

  2. #2
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    May 2007
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    While I have a lot of fond memories for the 110, as a fighting knife, I retired it years ago. The 110 is a compact hunting/general purpose field knife, not a fighter.

    Because the knife lacks a guard or heel, the lanyard is essential. Over time lanyard loops flatten out and sometimes become twisted. Being able to swiftly and positively loop fingers into a lanyard loop, from concealment while in a fight response is iffy at best. Not to mention, lanyards tend to snag on everything that crosses their path.

    My two cents: The 110 just isn't a suitable fighting knife. This is however, an option for those who carry the knife for nostalgic or sentimental reasons.
    Last edited by Cacti Rat; 09-25-2021 at 11:33 AM.

  3. #3
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    Carry a fixed blade...

  4. #4
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    Mar 2011
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    Western WA
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    I am always happy when I see innovation. That doesn’t always mean a particular innovation is for me, but thinking around problems and creating solutions to specific needs is almost always a good thing.

    The great benefit of the folding knife is its convenience. Part of that convenience is that a knife in the pocket does not require a sheath.

    The solution of course is based on a sheath, so it loses that bit of convenience (and just as importantly, the real estate on the belt which might be used for something else such as a spare magazine). But it is certainly a viable solution for those times when one cannot or does not want to carry a fixed blade.

    Without a viable solution for quickly, securely, and consistently drawing a folder, The idea of employing one when the violence has already started is not realistic. I won’t go so far as to say it can’t be done, but when the bad guy already has hands on you, when he is already landing blows, good luck drawing that folder.

    But, a system that allows for quick access, such as this one, the folder suddenly becomes a viable option.

    this particular one would not be my choice, because if I am going to dedicate the real estate on my belt to a sheath, I want a fixed blade. Yes, legalities can be an issue. But for some people, it may be just the ticket.

    The fact that it stays secure even in a clinch/grapple (certainly looks like it would stay secure) is a great thing and looks to be a strength. It does look like the surface area to grab is sparse, clearly an added challenge, but one that likely can be addressed with lots of practice (the loop may help but there are also downsides). I would strongly suggest buying another knife and removing the edge. This would of course allow “dry“ practice, saving that rubber washer some wear, But more importantly would allow practice against a resisting partner.

    Thumbs up for innovation and a clever, slick operating mechanism. Also looks like solid workmanship. Thumbs up as well for secure attachment to the belt and what looks to be solid retention. Not having my hands on one, my concern is the ability to securely grab the small bit of knife under pressure, but that can probably be addressed with lots of practice. And I do think that anyone who recognizes the value and need for this type of system will put in the practice time.
    Brent Yamamoto
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  5. #5
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    Thanks Brent. I was hoping you would weigh in.

    @ Cacti: We teach the “thumbcap” method because it mitigates the problems that arise from not always having a hilt or finger grooves as a feature. A minor compromise that allows our students to use improvised stabbers and weapons of opportunity.

    In the case of the 110 (the only knife these are currently made for) we recommend the version with the finger grooves.
    Last edited by judomayhem; 09-25-2021 at 01:03 PM.
    "He who can handle the quickest rate of change survives."

    -Col John Boyd

    "Only he is lost who gives himself up for lost"

    -Hans-Ulrich Rudel

  6. #6
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    2D2B32D0-AD10-4D92-B362-00290F7407FA.jpgThe thumbcap.
    I’m away from home, otherwise I’d demo it with the 110.
    Last edited by judomayhem; 09-25-2021 at 01:13 PM.
    "He who can handle the quickest rate of change survives."

    -Col John Boyd

    "Only he is lost who gives himself up for lost"

    -Hans-Ulrich Rudel

  7. #7
    Shannon Hogan's Avatar
    Shannon Hogan is offline Suarez International Affiliate - Salt Lake City
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    What henri and Brent said: fixed blade. Hence the 'The Gang Unit', and similar concept blades solve most of the points of concern, i.e. rapid intuitive accessibility UNDER DURESS, excellent retention, does not crowd the other gear, graspable scales, small profile, etc. I use my Gang Unit for everyday tasks reinforcing muscle memory. My back up blade is either a Spiderco P'Kal Wave or Benchmade Autocrat.
    fulminis instar "Like thunderbolts, fast as lightning."
    Hogan Clan motto.

  8. #8
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    Thank you for your response, Shannon.
    This “knife holster” does not take up noticeably more real estate than Gang Unit sized fix blades (which we also use and train with).
    Although worn appendix, it isn’t really designed to replace those. As you can see from my demo in the vid....draw speed rivals fixed blades. From my POV, it is designed to replace a Wave (or standard thumb stud/hole activated folder). We primarily teach the use of the icepick grip, with the intent of targeting the ocular cavities in a sewing machine fashion (and if those are momentarily unavailable... the neck arteries). The problems we kept running into with folders were that deploying them from the clinch, while grappling or running were difficult to work around in a reasonable manner. And then once in hand, manipulating the blade into an ideal grip was another hurdle. This is a solution to 90% of those problems.

    Also discussed was the potential legal issue of carrying a concealed fixed blade. While I’m past the age and lifestyle that would cause LEO to give me a second glance, my guys in their 20’s aren’t. So this eliminates that concern.
    "He who can handle the quickest rate of change survives."

    -Col John Boyd

    "Only he is lost who gives himself up for lost"

    -Hans-Ulrich Rudel

  9. #9
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    This is the kind of thing that is born from a leather worker with an old knife laying around. How do you take that skill set and cram an old school style of knife into it. Its an ingenious solution for sure using off the shelf hardware but its out classed these days. I also worry that a huge problem in the draw method is the little grip jump. I bet it would cause problems under pressure.
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  10. #10
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    I have my late father’s 110 and 112. The 110 is over 7 ounces, has no pocket clip and is a two hand opener. Want to buy my two? The 112 is BNIB! I have no use for them with modern companies like Spyderco make better materialed folders with single hand manipulation and 3-4 ounces

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