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  1. #1

    Default New manufacture Glock 17 generation 3 barrel rifling?

    Here is what I think I know:

    The older generation of Glocks had polygonal rifling which was very difficult to trace forensically

    Generation 5 Glocks have what I believe is called a marksman's barrel which they state allows for the use of lead bullets but also allows for forensic tracing of the rounds fired.

    Here is my question, do brand new production generation 3 Glock 17s have polygonal rifling or are they manufactured with the generation 5 style of rifling in the barrel which does allow for forensic tracing?

    If you know the answer to this question I would be grateful to hear it.

    Here are some questions I am not asking:

    Which barrel you prefer

    Which barrel you think is the best deal

    Which barrel you think is the most accurate

    Since I do not reload or shoot lead bullets I am not particularly interested in conventional rifling, thus I thought I would ask the tribe in the hopes that someone might have factual information regarding this question.

    Thank you very much for taking the time to read this post
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Default New manufacture Glock 17 generation 3 barrel rifling?

    Gen 3 Austrian guns have polygonal rifling. I got one of those Lipsey P80 pistols, and just checked. It might not be a true Gen 3, but it used that for the base (internals are Gen 3).

    Now, unsure if Gen 3 US guns are the same… but I’d lean to say probably. I would think eventually Glock would want to make production cheaper/easier, and go across the board with one rifling or the other. I could definitely see them doing the Marksman barrel in the Gen 3s over putting polygonal in the Gen 5s.

    For preference… I really don’t care which rifling. My previous duty gun was an H&K P2000 LEM in .40… which I partly miss because it was very accurate (shitty trigger aside). Those had polygonal rifling.

    Currently, I’m issued a Glock 19 Gen 5 MOS… which has traditional rifling. Similar accuracy, even at further distances.

    Didn’t notice any perceivable difference with the P80 (pretty much, a 17 Gen 3 without a rail).

    In regards to the best deal… I don’t think I’d pick due to that specific feature. I would think the overall package would be a better decision than what rifling is being used.
    Last edited by Screwball; 08-26-2021 at 07:47 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    219
    Currently produced Gen 3 pistols still have the standard polygonal BBL (at least the one I purchased earlier this year did). Gen 3 and before Glock BBLs are the toughest Glocks to ID back to a bullet they fired. I have made IDs to Gen 4 Glocks on occasions, and the Gen 5 type are fairly straightforward to ID. Its a bit more complicated than polygonal rifling =can't ID bullet. I will say that I am not aware of any after market Gen5 BBL that has the Gen 3 and earlier type rifling. Also keep in mind the fired cartridge cases from glocks are typically very easy to ID back to the pistol and this can be done on multiple surfaces within the pistol. Just an FYI, Glock did run some Gen 3 pistols with a type of marking BBL at the request of a large US police dept (see the Glock EBIS barrel studies that have been published in the forensic literature). I am not sure if any of these made it out into the wild, but ID was possible with those BBLs also.

    From what Ive seen, when shooting from a ransom rest, the Gen5 BBLs seem to be a bit more accurate, but I am not sure that the difference is enough to switch to the Gen5 if the small gain in accuracy was the sole factor.
    Last edited by forensicgun; 08-27-2021 at 11:42 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    1,816
    Traditionally, cast lead bullets were way more common in sport pistol shooting. It's cheap and splatters against steel so it has a lesser ricochet danger. Polygonal rifling is said to be no good with lead bullets but that's debated. Today lead is used less because of environmental concerns, liability driven "no reload" rules at ranges and so on.

    As far as cut rifling being more accurate than polygonal, maybe sort of. Enough so that it makes a difference firing factory ammo from a 5ish inch barrel that isn't bolted to a ransom rest? Probably not.

    Lots of aftermarket barrel for Glocks are cut rifling but I think that's because its easy enough to make them that way. I doubt that the poly vs cut debate really means much. Other things like chamber and muzzle spec and finish and proper fit to your slide make more noticeable difference. So buy a factory barrel for factory level performance or get a SI barrel fit for better than factory performance and you will be a happy shooter.

  5. #5
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    Jun 2005
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    Gabe had a thread about 4 years ago on this subject

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...ARKING-BARRELS

    Apparently the answer to your question is yes, the new barrels of gen 3, 4 & 5 do forensic marking
    Last edited by Eliakim; 08-28-2021 at 08:18 AM.
    "Remember to always be yourself: Unless you suck." - Joss Whedon

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by forensicgun View Post
    Currently produced Gen 3 pistols still have the standard polygonal BBL (at least the one I purchased earlier this year did). Gen 3 and before Glock BBLs are the toughest Glocks to ID back to a bullet they fired. I have made IDs to Gen 4 Glocks on occasions, and the Gen 5 type are fairly straightforward to ID. Its a bit more complicated than polygonal rifling =can't ID bullet. I will say that I am not aware of any after market Gen5 BBL that has the Gen 3 and earlier type rifling. Also keep in mind the fired cartridge cases from glocks are typically very easy to ID back to the pistol and this can be done on multiple surfaces within the pistol. Just an FYI, Glock did run some Gen 3 pistols with a type of marking BBL at the request of a large US police dept (see the Glock EBIS barrel studies that have been published in the forensic literature). I am not sure if any of these made it out into the wild, but ID was possible with those BBLs also.

    From what Ive seen, when shooting from a ransom rest, the Gen5 BBLs seem to be a bit more accurate, but I am not sure that the difference is enough to switch to the Gen5 if the small gain in accuracy was the sole factor.
    What do you see differently about gen 4 barrels than gen 3 and earlier? The "polygonal" rifling appears more or less the same between both, but I'm curious what you see that is different?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlwilliams View Post
    Traditionally, cast lead bullets were way more common in sport pistol shooting. It's cheap and splatters against steel so it has a lesser ricochet danger. Polygonal rifling is said to be no good with lead bullets but that's debated. Today lead is used less because of environmental concerns, liability driven "no reload" rules at ranges and so on.

    As far as cut rifling being more accurate than polygonal, maybe sort of. Enough so that it makes a difference firing factory ammo from a 5ish inch barrel that isn't bolted to a ransom rest? Probably not.

    Lots of aftermarket barrel for Glocks are cut rifling but I think that's because its easy enough to make them that way. I doubt that the poly vs cut debate really means much. Other things like chamber and muzzle spec and finish and proper fit to your slide make more noticeable difference. So buy a factory barrel for factory level performance or get a SI barrel fit for better than factory performance and you will be a happy shooter.
    I can vouch for the accuracy of everything you said here. Right on.
    The precision capabilty of the pistol isn't about the type of rifling, it's about barrel fit and other details. Some of the most accurate pistols in the world use polygonal rifling, but conventional rifling (either cut or button rifled) is much easier to do so it's the common style for aftermarket barrels.

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