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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    621
    Quote Originally Posted by Papa View Post
    The 15s were pretty good, too. So were the 27s, 57s, Model 41s and the .22 revolvers.
    The implication being that adjustable-sight Smiths were upscale guns, with better quality control in all aspects. The Models 10 and 13 were plain vanilla issue pieces meant for low-bid contracts. And, of course, we need to remember that 1960 was sixty years ago. Once you hit middle age, what seems like the day-before-yesterday is surprisingly long ago.

  2. #12
    My agency issued and authorized revolvers for many years, and only recently discontinued the their use around 2015. A few of us went to the agency level S&W armorers’ schools and we were busy every qualification working inspection gauges, replacing worn parts, and occasionally having to seek assistance from the factory for larger issues. Over the years I don’t recall a quality change, but absolutely would agree revolvers require more work and skill. The broken M&P 340PD….. shit just happens - to everything. I carry a M&P 340 and use it a lot, but agree - again - the steel frame Js are more suited to continued pounding. I would love to find an early 90s 1 7/8” 640 for heavy use but they’re rare. My 49s/649s do well in lieu of a 640.

    M&P 340s are not infallible, but still offer a lot - just like most things man-made.

    I wish we still authorized revolvers, but completely understand why we don’t knowing the maintenance requirement.

    I guess my long point is everything has issues. We’ve destroyed .357 SIG Glocks and SIGs, and years ago at USBP many .40 Berettas were sacrificed to the mission of training/enforcing.
    Last edited by JonathanNobody; 08-10-2021 at 06:10 PM.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Melbourne, Florida
    Posts
    840
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike OTDP View Post
    ... Once you hit middle age, what seems like the day-before-yesterday is surprisingly long ago.
    No shit. So many people don't know what TH, TS, RB, WO, RR means.

    -- ML

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    5,003
    Quote Originally Posted by Mushinto View Post
    No shit. So many people don't know what TH, TS, RB, WO, RR means.

    -- ML
    Only the faithful.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I rode the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer (as modified)

    "What cannot be remedied must be endured."

    Vale et omnia quae.

    P:20

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    5,003
    Trying to summon courage to cut brush, so did a little informal return to yesteryear with a Model 13, a 681 and, as sort of a control, a Colt Trooper, all ex-cop guns, all in .357 and all with a nominal 4" barrel. .357 ammo being somewhat more available, I used old PMC 158 gr JSP and new Remington 125 gr JHP.

    The good news: except for the tendency of the L frame to unscrew its ejector rod, no malfunctions. Maybe plumber's tape this time.

    The bad news:

    1. Ramp sights in bright sunshine do not play well with buff or even white target backgrounds in shade. Not with my eyes.
    2. Narrow, shallow rear sight notches prevent rapid sight acquisition, do not allow proper alignment for windage and play hell with elevation. You keep looking for more front sight.
    2A. Mr. MOTO says: Fixed sights require hold off. I suspect that were I shooting 148 gr WC or 158 gr LRN all three guns would be right on. The Trooper has adjustables, but see #3, below.
    3. The Myth of Grip is not a myth when it comes to hard-recoiling DA sixguns. I have reasonably strong hands. After twelve full-house 158s out of the Trooper, which wears a highly textured standard Colt OP-patterned grip, I put it aside. It was like being rapped hard on the middle finger with a small brass hammer. The 13, a round-butt conversion, wore Pachmayr Compacs. Not pleasant, but tolerable. The 681, a square butt with modified Pachmayr Presentations, was just right.
    4. DA triggers--the Colt was smooth but stacked until an abrupt letoff. The two Smiths pretimed early, and it was distracting after years of 92s and SIGs. The 681 was roughest of the three.
    5. Accuracy--I cut my (shooting) teeth on a Model 10. In my hands,the accuracy of these three guns, which are 40 to 60 years old, was disappointing. I shot them DA except for eight rounds SA from the 681 at about 30 yards.

    I shoot more precisely and more accurately with every TDA semiauto I've tested in the past couple of years.

    Nostalgia has its place. But there's a 226 in my waistband right now.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I rode the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer (as modified)

    "What cannot be remedied must be endured."

    Vale et omnia quae.

    P:20

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Papa View Post
    2A. Mr. MOTO says: Fixed sights require hold off. I suspect that were I shooting 148 gr WC or 158 gr LRN all three guns would be right on. The Trooper has adjustables, but see #3, below.
    I have never understood the concept of fixed sights on a magnum.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunstore Commando View Post
    I have never understood the concept of fixed sights on a magnum.
    Although I still like the looks of fixed-sight N frames.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunstore Commando View Post
    Although I still like the looks of fixed-sight N frames.
    I’ve carried a fixed-sight N-Frame on-duty back when Firearms Instructors were required to use both revolvers and automatics to maintain proficiency and I believe they’re the best of the breed. I now have a .357 Magnum 520 and .45 Colt Heavy Duty. I see many advantages to the fixed-sights, but you do have to put in the time to know where they hit.
    Last edited by JonathanNobody; 08-11-2021 at 03:34 PM.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanNobody View Post
    I now have a .357 Magnum 520
    38-44 Heavy Duty of a new generation.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    5,003
    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanNobody View Post
    I’ve carried a fixed-sight N-Frame on-duty back when Firearms Instructors were required to use both revolvers and automatics to maintain proficiency and I believe they’re the best of the breed. I now have a .357 Magnum 520 and .45 Colt Heavy Duty. I see many advantages to the fixed-sights, but you do have to put in the time to know where they hit.
    520-2.jpgbowensmith2.jpg

    For the visual learners, two gems.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I rode the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer (as modified)

    "What cannot be remedied must be endured."

    Vale et omnia quae.

    P:20

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