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  1. #1
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    Default Is the quality of Smith & Wesson Revolvers going down?

    Subject: Scandium .357 - 340 PD

    During qual 5 rds of 38 +P 135 gr HP Gold Dot SB. Chunk that came off hit the instructor running the course (no injury). Low round count, just carried a lot in an ankle rig. It continued to run after the chunk came off (round 2 or 3 of 5) as the shooter did not notice it.
    I saw this post elsewhere. Several explanations were offered; what seems most credible to me is the barrel was screwed or torqued with too much pressure. But what ever the cause was, it should not happen to a quality fire arm. There are claims that this has happened also with aluminum frame guns and that S&W is also using mim parts in their N frames. There is a claim that the older guns are superior.
    Are there any thoughts or knowledge about Scandium guns or other guns failing in this manner?





  2. #2
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    I've seen a couple of older non +P alloy Js on GB that had frame cracks at the barrel junction. So it's not unknown.

    Smith is using MIM action parts as well as thumb pieces and such. No MIM parts seem to be involved in this fail.

    The new guns sound tinny when dry fired, but they are alleged to be more accurate and durable. I have three newish Smiths, an N, a K and a J. The J seems more accurate, for what that's worth, with examples posted in another thread.

    Further affiant sayeth not.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I rode the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer (as modified)

    "What cannot be remedied must be endured."

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  3. #3
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    its pretty well documented that smith in recent years has gone down in quality. its pretty evident if you've ever spent a lot of time handling an older one. you can feel it in every bit of the trigger pull and cylinder. if you ever disassemble and look at the inside, its apparent with the mim parts, which smith has never tried to hide, and the internal machining. as far as their scandium framed stuff, they're simply not made for heavy use. don't get me wrong, theyre 100% reliable, but were never intended to go through the same wear and tear as their steel frames.

    Do NOT call me an armorer
    Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum
    Now I am become Death, the destroyer of all worlds
    People have asked me if I consider myself a good or bad person. The truth of it is, I don't know or care. I have been called both. I like to think I have saved more lives than I have ended. Either way, I can still sleep at night.
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  4. #4
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    IMO it is their quality control that has gone done, not necessarily the quality.
    It is more common than ever to have to send back a new gun for warranty work.
    But once the warranty department fixes it they have been good.

  5. #5
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    In the mid seventies I did an action job on a new Model 10. Once the sideplate was off I found beaucoup metal chips and shavings, including an interrupted circular ribbon ring of heat blued steel about an eighth of an inch wide and almost an inch in diameter. Surprised the gun would cycle at all and don't know how they got the sideplate on in the first place.

    Smith's nickel finish in those days was notorious for its poor QC and for its strange yellowish hue.

    Colt had labor problems during that period and what passed for its pistol division never really recovered. In the case of, say, the Mark III revolvers there were design issues as well, including fragile "sintered" parts you couldn't stone, like my trigger that broke at the frame pivot hole.

    Meanwhile Ruger was building crudely finished stoutly built revolvers that could be repaired with a spare part and a paper clip. Capitalism abhors a vacuum.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I rode the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer (as modified)

    "What cannot be remedied must be endured."

    Vale et omnia quae.

    P:20

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Papa View Post
    In the mid seventies I did an action job on a new Model 10. Once the sideplate was off I found beaucoup metal chips and shavings, including an interrupted circular ribbon ring of heat blued steel about an eighth of an inch wide and almost an inch in diameter. Surprised the gun would cycle at all and don't know how they got the sideplate on in the first place.

    Smith's nickel finish in those days was notorious for its poor QC and for its strange yellowish hue.

    Colt had labor problems during that period and what passed for its pistol division never really recovered. In the case of, say, the Mark III revolvers there were design issues as well, including fragile "sintered" parts you couldn't stone, like my trigger that broke at the frame pivot hole.

    Meanwhile Ruger was building crudely finished stoutly built revolvers that could be repaired with a spare part and a paper clip. Capitalism abhors a vacuum.
    During the vietnam war the SMITH and Wesson was said to have gone down. The model 15 that I purchased during that time period seemed to have been a well made gun.

    Smith vs Ruger: If I pay more, I expect more.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Papa View Post
    In the mid seventies I did an action job on a new Model 10. Once the sideplate was off I found beaucoup metal chips and shavings, including an interrupted circular ribbon ring of heat blued steel about an eighth of an inch wide and almost an inch in diameter. Surprised the gun would cycle at all and don't know how they got the sideplate on in the first place.
    model 10s and 13s were all made to shitty standards. they were mass produced at bare minimum costs for contract fulfillment.

    Do NOT call me an armorer
    Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum
    Now I am become Death, the destroyer of all worlds
    People have asked me if I consider myself a good or bad person. The truth of it is, I don't know or care. I have been called both. I like to think I have saved more lives than I have ended. Either way, I can still sleep at night.
    SEMPER FI

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShopMonkey View Post
    model 10s and 13s were all made to shitty standards. they were mass produced at bare minimum costs for contract fulfillment.
    Hmm...did S&W have a premium line? I can believe that the Models 14, 19, and 29 would be "halo" models, with a bit of extra care given to them.

  9. #9
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    It's why there were so many gunsmiths working on Smiths then and later, and cops who would do the work for you on the QT in your department.

    Low bid sixgun, walking the beat in the Four One. No speed loaders authorized. JP holster, complete with two pen holders.

    mightypen.jpgpenholster.jpg

    What could go wrong?
    Last edited by Papa; 08-10-2021 at 01:03 PM.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I rode the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer (as modified)

    "What cannot be remedied must be endured."

    Vale et omnia quae.

    P:20

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike OTDP View Post
    Hmm...did S&W have a premium line? I can believe that the Models 14, 19, and 29 would be "halo" models, with a bit of extra care given to them.
    The 15s were pretty good, too. So were the 27s, 57s, Model 41s and the .22 revolvers.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I rode the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer (as modified)

    "What cannot be remedied must be endured."

    Vale et omnia quae.

    P:20

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