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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    6,454
    WT members in the Seattle area, there’s still room to sign up.

    First class is tonight at 6:30.

    Saturday class starts at 9am tomorrow.

    This is a great opportunity and likely it’s the last time I will be bringing in outside talent. It’s gonna be a lot of fun and you don’t want to miss out.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    6,454
    Just met with Rory and Randy for a pre-class coffee. You guys who can’t make it are missing out. This weekend is gonna be a fun time.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Chattanooga TN
    Posts
    3,514
    Class review????
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor
    NRA Certified Instructor
    Tennessee State Handgun Carry Permit Instructor
    Glock Factory Certified Armorer
    IDPA Master Class SSP, ESP,CDP, CCP, BUG, CO
    Gung Ho Chuan Association

    TRAIN with me....https://suarezinternational.com/sear...h_query=harris

    Fundamentalist Christian Man at Arms

    AKA - CRUEL HAND LUKE

    Joel 3:10 - Beat your plowshares into swords , and your pruning hooks into spears; train even your weaklings to be warriors.

    Through HIS power I can walk on water..IF I just have the faith and courage to get out of the boat.

    A good man who's done a couple of bad things along the way....

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    NW Washington
    Posts
    3,008
    Quote Originally Posted by Randy Harris View Post
    Class review????
    I've been putting off replying here until I had the time to do it justice, but figured I better just go ahead and post something. I'm super busy this week and exhausted, so please understand that my brevity here is not a reflection on content of the class.

    I attended Friday and Saturday, wish I'd been able to do Sunday as well. It really was an excellent course, with a lot of good (and sometimes just plain cool) content packed in.
    Randy King spoke on Friday night about identifying threats. His analysis on breaking down "clues" to determine social vs predatory threats was some excellent material that resonated with some of my own experience but broke it down in ways I hadn't thought of before.
    Then Saturday was mostly Rory Miller (with both Randy and Brent also instructing) teaching us infighting and dirty boxing techniques. We did a lot of striking drills and worked on power generation, which I learned a lot from.

    I hadn't met Rory before; my first impression was that he didn't seem physically intimidating but looked like a mean bastard, after getting to know him I realized he's far more intimidating than he looks, but is also a super nice guy. I'd definitely attend training with him and Randy again, and of course I can never say enough about Brent's training and hard work into organizing something like this; I've never come away from any training session with Brent without feeling like it was 1st class instruction all the way.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    404
    I wanted to post a comment on this class earlier, but my internet has been having issues this past week.

    This was an excellent seminar. Randy King and Rory Miller run a good class. I have never trained with either one before, but Brent turned me onto Rory's books several years back, so I had familiarity with the subject matter (also, there is a lot of cross-pollination between what/how Brent teaches and what/how Rory teaches). A lot of the material covered in this class was from Rory's books, but, as with all physical skills, hands-on is completely different than reading a book. The first night covered differentiating between a person who might be inclined to social violence versus one inclined to asocial violence. Dealing with these two classes of threats requires completely different skills and tools and what might de-escalate one type will generally escalate the other (and vise versa). This session was much more academic, but it did involve some role-playing, which I found myself needing to practice more (as we have discussed before on WT, impromptu acting, communication, & de-escalation are part of being a well-rounded martial artist; not every problem requires a knife or firearm).

    The next day we dove into the meat of the class: dirty judo & dirty boxing (infighting). The class assumes that the gap between you and the bad guy has already been closed and you are in "the clinch" (a very awkward distance for many traditional "karate" practitioners). The rest of the class was spent learning how to get to the rear of the opponent, how to target effectively, and how to generate power while striking. The class was made up of many "lego block" drills that built on each other and stacked as the class progressed. We practiced several variations of the "one-step" drill to train targeting, proximity, movement, and looking for "gifts" that the opponent gives. We practiced several drills that gave us confidence in our natural ability to track/anticipate an opponent's movement when in "the clinch" including some blindfolded training. We practiced a variety of locks and learned several techniques to improve striking power. There were several groups of people that trained over the three-day class. It was good to be able to train with a variety of people and figure out how to adapt techniques to work on different body-types (again, you can't learn this stuff from a book). Of course, there were several of those moments (which I am getting used to in Brent's dojo) where one of the instructors "magically" increased my power-generation by skillfully shifting the focus of my mind from one part of my body to another... these learnings are always worth the price of admission by themselves.

    The class was the first of a new training tour Rory and Randy just began. It was fun to be a part of and to learn from these great martial artists. As always, it was a pleasure training with Brent and getting his input on the different techniques. If you get a chance, I would highly recommend training with Rory and Randy and, of course, Brent. Also, get Rory's books: Facing Violence, Meditations on Violence, Training for Sudden Violence, and Scaling Force are must-haves (he has others that I have not read, that I am sure are also worthwhile). Randy & Rory, if you read this forum, thanks for a great weekend and for sharing your hard-earned knowledge and experience with us! Brent, thanks for hosting this event, rounding out the content with your own skills, and for being such a model martial arts practitioner and teacher for me!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    6,454
    Thanks to Yondering and Jonathan for the kind words on the seminar! I'm very happy you both enjoyed it and learned some great stuff.

    I've trained with lots of instructors over the years. I mean, I learn from everyone, students and instructors and DVDs and YouTube, etc. etc. But there are are select few that I consider MY instructors, people that have taught me the good stuff. I don't get my "stuff" from Rory; I've gotten all the technique I need from different systems over the years, but for me Rory was one of those guys that helped me pull it all together. Even before I knew how to articulate it, I have been on a mission of integrating skill sets (karate, guns, grappling, throwing, fighting vs self-defense, legal...etc.). That integration has always been a driving force for me. Rory was the guy that really influenced me on that integration. It's all about connecting all the disparate dots, more about finding the similarities between different methods rather than looking at the obvious differences. When you can recognize that one movement, say for example cutting with a sword, is also a punch, is also a throw, is also a joint lock...lots of things fall into place. It also begins to make your training time infinitely more valuable. Instead of practiching one thing, you're consiously (and unconsciously) practicing ten things.

    It takes awhile to get there. But training with the right people can drastically shorten your learning curve. That's one of the things Rory did for me. Not only as a fighter, but also as a teacher. I teach my own stuff, but Rory was a huge influence on HOW I teach it. (And thankfully, but also unsurprisingly, that was a good fit for Gabe, to whom I'll always be grateful for brining me on board.)

    For me, it's pretty rare to see something NEW. There are a few things I think I'm pretty good at, a few more things I'm passably competent, and a lot of things I need to improve. So, although there are things I might not be great at, I have seen most stuff that's out there. But there's always new ways of looking at the same stuff, always new connections to be made.

    A couple examples. As this was an in-fighting seminar, almost all the work was based off the clinch and we spent a lot of time working on passing that clinch and getting into a supperior/safer postion. One of these passed under the other guy's arm (useful when you're shorter than the bad guy). Another was an arm drag (you could say this was going over/around the other guy's arm). Rory pointed out that for karate guys, going under the other guy's arm was really just the "rising block". To which I replied that the arm drag was just a "low block". Rory said to me later that it annoyed him that he hadn't made that connection before.

    It's all the same stuff but there are almost infinite ways to put it together.

    Power generation is an important subject and it's always interesting to see other people's take on it. Suffice to say there are lots of ways to generate power. Some are easier to learn than others, and some work better for different people. Some work better in different situations or ranges. All are useful...IF you practice them to the point of unconscious competence.

    Rory and I are big into structure. That is a big subject, but it requires correct joint alignment and firing the right muscles at the right time. It requires the right balance of tension and relaxation, in the right places. When it's done well, it makes everything work better. It's what makes guys like me and Rory, who are not the biggest guys in the room, dangerous. Guys who are big and strong have a hard time learning good structure because they are used to making everything work with muscle (and more muscle is always better!). But good structure can often beat it. And the stronger you are, the better it works.

    Rory made the point that structure doesn't increase your power, but it minimiizes the power that leaks out of your joints. I think there's a bit more to it but I will largely agree.

    More to say but I need to hit the iron.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

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