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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Phoenix, Arizona
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    2,845
    I am grateful that I have had that 'call' a few times, doing something significant (for someone else) because I did heed that voice.
    "When one goes willingly into the darkness, all he will find there, is what he brought in with him".

    --Gabe Suarez, after the 7-11 shootout

    Proper development of the 'Warrior Spirit', training and physical conditioning before 'The Event' cannot be overstated.

    U.S. Army Rangers (1/75 'Old Scroll')
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  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    227
    It's saved my butt more than once, I'm not sure how the skill comes, or how to develop it, but as others have said, if you don't listen for it, you'll never hear it. Good on you Taipan, you probably saved that man's life.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Colorado
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    8,547
    Your gut, the voice in the back of your head or any other name for it is a real thing. You should listen to it.
    Geek Warlord
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  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Third Coast
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    4,641
    While some of it may very well be divine/epherial (as likely in Gabes case) . Most of our "gut feeling" is our sub conscious filtering data at a much higher rate than the conscious mind does. It filters it though a decision tree composed of bad things that have happened in the past. To include locations, patterns, colors, smells, body motions, etc. When enough things match (even from different previous incidents) the penny drops and you get the feeling.

    Not seeing the package, Gabes subconscious may have picked up on the names of the meds indicating serious stuff (maybe not what they did, but if they were uncommon etc.) and that spurred the feeling and subsequent response.

    I still tell the story of going on a meth lab hit, entry was through the back door , through grass as high as a giraffes ass. About halfway on the approach I got the feeling, stopped the team and diverted to a side door hit. Takedown when like clockwork and i took a few minutes on the back porch to consider what gave me the feeling. It was shit, now I could consciously smell it (I couldnt before) a little bit of legwork and I found the uncovered septic tank in the back yard on our original approach avenue. Had I not listened to the feeling I would have been neck deep in shit.

    I use it to humorously illustrate why you should listen to that feeling.
    NEVER CONFUSE GETTING LUCKY WITH GOOD TACTICS (unless you are at the bar)

    I'm not in the business of Losing

    A stab to the taint beats most of the mystical bullshit, most of the time

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Exiled in Texas
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    7,495
    I know that Gavin DeBecker doesn't get a lot of love around here, but his book, The Gift of Fear, really is excellent. He focuses on the kind of recognition that coastalcop addresses--where your subconscious mind has alerted to certain cues, but your rational mind hasn't yet caught up enough to articulate what you observed. Generally, women are more open to the idea of intuition. Men will often fight it, and refuse to accept something unless it is supported by cold, hard logic. DeBecker presents an argument that is useful in getting people to listen to the voice even when they can't yet support it logically, and accept that doing so is not illogical.

    Divine intervention is a step beyond that. DeBecker doesn't touch on that possibility. I'm a firm believer in divine intervention. If guardian angels drink beer, then I'm going to owe my angel a brewery. But I'm glad that DeBecker just left it at the level of logic. Whether you believe in the divine or not is irrelevant to choosing a course of action. Whether you believe it is God tapping you on the shoulder, or a set of clues that your subconscious mind has alerted to, the important part is acting on it. Don't suppress the thought.

    I wonder how many times in life I have averted tragedy by listening. Sometimes you get to see the fallout, as in coastal's example above. But there are a multitude of occasions when I have deviated from my customary path because the little voice told me to do so. And the result was that nothing happened, for good or bad. Was there a danger that I avoided? Maybe. I'll probably never know. I can at least say that nothing terrible ever happened as a result of acting based on input from the little voice.

    Once you open your mind up to it, the task becomes easier. The more you listen, the more you'll hear.
    Virtute et Armis

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
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    47,743
    Quote Originally Posted by LawDog View Post
    Once you open your mind up to it, the task becomes easier. The more you listen, the more you'll hear.
    Indeed!
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2
    That's a great way to put it family. The more you listen, the more you'll hear.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,920
    Twice in my life I've had a similar experience. The first time was when I was 17 with a freshly minted drivers license. I was driving on a residential street and noticed a kid riding his bike on the sidewalk and a little voice in my head said "He's going to swerve into the street and crash." Sure enough that's what happened. He went off the curb and fell down right in front of me. If I hadn't been anticipating it, I would have gone right over him. Twenty years later I had the same thing happen. A kid was sitting stationary in his driveway on his bike and I heard that same voice say, "Watch out!" right before he darted out into the street in front of me. I was speeding a bit and if I hadn't been breaking before he even started pedaling, I would have hit him.
    Last edited by kabar; 06-30-2021 at 10:48 AM.
    Breakfast cereal is just dog food for people
    "Zen? Meh! Who needs it? All that effort to achieve nothingness and what do you got? Bupkis!"

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
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    6,455
    I was not a fan of the Debecker book on many levels.

    Where I would agree is on the one point that I will sum up as “listen to your gut”.

    He made the point that in our society we are conditioned to be polite, conditioned not to make a scene (both men and women but particularly with women). And that when it comes to matters of our safety, of potential violence when dealing with uncomfortable situations with a stranger, we need to listen to our “fear”...THAT is the gift of fear and listening to it can save our lives.

    Now I would not label this fear. I would call this our gut, Gabe calls it the voice in this thread...it might be God or might be our subconscious or whatever...but we need to keep our ears open.

    On that one point, I think Debecker had it right. But in my reading, that is the only valuable thing in the book. (I am clearly in the minority in the self-defense industry because most that I see praise the book highly.) But I object fundamentally to many things he said...simply on the surface I cannot fundamentally support the idea that fear is a gift (even though I agree 100% with the idea if listening to that voice).
    Brent Yamamoto
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  10. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Exiled in Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    On that one point, I think Debecker had it right. But in my reading, that is the only valuable thing in the book. (I am clearly in the minority in the self-defense industry because most that I see praise the book highly.) But I object fundamentally to many things he said...simply on the surface I cannot fundamentally support the idea that fear is a gift (even though I agree 100% with the idea if listening to that voice).
    It's been 20 years since I read the book, so I only recall the highlights. I remember you expressing previously your dislike of the word "fear" as the characterization of our mind's alert process. I agree with the criticism, but also understand why he would choose that word. It's succinct and makes for a pretty catchy title. Do you recall the other points in the book that you would dispute? I know there was more to it, but only the central premise lingers in my mind.
    Virtute et Armis

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