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  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    J & N
    Okay, but where's the K?

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    47,782
    I confess to having a love affair with big old revolvers. My first duty weapon...hardly big, was an issued S&W Model 67 Combat Masterpiece. I shot expert in the LASD Academy...and later when I used my own tuned S&W 686, Distinguished Expert. I wore that pin on my dress uniform long after shooting medals went the way of hiring gunfighters for the job. Wore it right next to my valor ribbon.

    In the early 1990s I visited the Cody museum in Wyoming and left the place heavily impressed after I beheld all the old man-killer's weapons. Big heavy Smith & Wesson revolvers with subtle modifications here...and there. Back when handguns were handmade like a Katana or a Rapier, rather than the mass produced things we see today. One of the curators was a student and friend, and I was able to handle some of them. Back in that era nobody complained that a weapon was too heavy...men were collectively stronger perhaps...or perhaps the act of killing well made the weight unimportant.

    The 41 Magnum has always held some fascination, like the 10mm has.

    Smith made many revolvers in those days from the 38-44 up to the new fangled 44 magnum. All N Frames.

    Model 20 in 38-44
    Model 21 in 44 Special...a fine Killing Round BTW
    Model 22 aka the 1917 in 45 ACP
    Model 23 in 38-44 again with adjustable sights (the era's version of a red fucking dot)
    Model 24 Adj Sighted 44 Special
    Model 25 in 45 Colt
    Model 26 lighter version of the 25 (probably an under appreciated gem)
    Model 27 The Highway Patrolman in 357 Magnum
    Model 28 A budget version of the 27
    Model 29...who doesn't know this one?

    Its easy to get nostalgic.

    For me it would be a clamshell basketweave rig with a pouch for two speed loaders, a 6" Smith 686, a 415 Gonzales in the sap pocket, and an Ithaca 37 as we stopped off at King Taco in East Los. "Y Que Putos". We did some crazy shit in those days with equipment that even a welfare rat wouldn't want today. But the killing...its all about the killing. Tools are designed to facilitate the killing. And if we refuse to be pulled into the nostalgia rabbit hole, and fuck it is easy to go into that hole...specially for me...then we look at the 686 on the one hand...and the Glock Guttersnipe on the other. Classic lines, and deadly killing focus...on both...but fuck...which one would kill better...up close...at distance...taking a shot after a couple of drinks...on a tango standing next to your UC partner?

    Modernity allows us to take shortcuts...to do things our grandfathers could only dream about...and do it easily. They had great shit though. They had Hemingway, and Jazz and chicks that didn't want to be dudes...and Louis Armstrong, and Elmer Keith, and John Wayne...and heroes that were made in the blood of war not by playing some bullshit ball game. But we have ways to hold on to their ideals yet do what they wanted to do better.

    Tonight...maybe tomorrow...maybe next week or next year, specially the way shit is roiling up all around this great experiment that was America...you will get that tap on the shoulder that we have waited for our entire lives...and you will turn and the ghost of Winston Churchill will be right there and he will say, "Young man...I have a very special task for you, for which you are eminently qualified and trained for...are you ready son?" And then you will hear gunfire and screams and you will see and smell death...a smell that you will never forget

    At that moment...what do you want in your hand
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    6,485
    I love the big revolvers too. And something about the 41 mag has always called me.

    But nostalgia doesn’t guide my fighting choices. There is always a Glock or a Sig in my holster.

    I confess to a love of swords and swordsmanship. I do think the practice has value, but I won’t be carrying a sabre into battle (as much as I want to on some level).

    The J frame is absolutely a practical thing today. A big N frame? Out in the woods, sure. Or perhaps, the proverbial BBQ gun. It’s something fun to show off to your warrior buddies, much like a sword. Look at this beautiful work of martial art (that is a better use for the term!) and all can appreciate it for what it is. We can appreciate that it is a most capable weapon if pressed into service, while recognizing it is not in the first string.

    I wore this gun to meet Ted and Don for a warrior dinner. I wanted to show it off! But I wore my Glock as well, because Seattle is Seattle. Was it heavy? Yeah, but not so bad. Would I make a habit of it? No. But I can if I ever wanted to (not that I can imagine normal circumstances where I would).

    My attitude is that I can kill a man with a spoon if I need to. I think that is important. As I think it is important, as Musashi said, to not have a favorite weapon. Be good with lots of things. But I would never purposely choose something with less capability.

    When I get that tap on the shoulder, I intend to be as capable in mind and body as I can be. And I expect the same from my tools.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    6,485
    Quote Originally Posted by charliemike1 View Post
    Very nice revolver Brent. I really like the crowning, did you have it cut?
    Bought the gun just as it is. Someone took good care of it and paid a premium to Magnaport for all the work. It is a work of art. The pictures I saw when I bought it did not do it justice (nor do my pics, this gun really shines in person).

    I have a newer 57 that I considered sending to Magnaport. I would have ended up pretty similar to this. But when I saw this available, I snapped it up.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    47,782
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post

    My attitude is that I can kill a man with a spoon if I need to. I think that is important. As I think it is important, as Musashi said, to not have a favorite weapon. Be good with lots of things. But I would never purposely choose something with less capability.

    When I get that tap on the shoulder, I intend to be as capable in mind and body as I can be. And I expect the same from my tools.

    Big smile on my end brother. That first quote...hell yes. And should any member of the tribe kill a tango with a spoon...they shall be lionized in a way that would have made the very Roman emperors jealous.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    4,927
    "At that moment...what do you want in your hand..."

    The SIG 229 I shot this afternoon, with a TLR-1, 6moa Deltapoint Pro, Grayguns trigger and drawbar and a factory fresh slide and barrel. Or one very like it.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I rode the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer (as modified)

    "What cannot be remedied must be endured."

    Vale et omnia quae.

    P:20

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    6,485
    Quote Originally Posted by LawDog View Post
    Interesting. Iíve never used those. Whatís your take on them?
    I like them so far. They are not as finely fitted to the frame as I might like, but that is nitpicking.

    Stocks are very personal but this is my take. They are very functional, easy to grab (I despise rubber and finger grooves, the smooth front edge really facilities my firing grip). The shape at the top of the grip is perfect for both thumb and trigger finger (I find most stocks have too much material/too thick for my taste). The texture is an excellent balance of smooth and, well, texture. And there is just enough checkering to make the grip secure in the hand. And they may be understated but I think they look nice.

    The cut for the thumb is perfect for me. The ďedgeĒ may be just a wee bit proud, but I donít see myself firing this enough to create a hotspot.
    343EDAAE-0F2B-422C-8846-88D67E7FBDFF.jpeg

    The trigger finger side is also comfortable. And comfortable enough for the thumb if firing lefty. I could see removing a little material for this purpose, and would if I was a lefty, but donít think itís necessary.
    334AE287-E177-490B-BC16-B0FAF81908C7.jpeg

    The bottom is a bit edgy for my taste. If I was carrying this regularly I would taper the edge just a little. Not that this is a concealment gun but I am a perfectionist. A more tapered, softer edge prints less. But this is a pretty gun and not gonna get enough carry time for me to muck up the aesthetics of the grip. Maybe if I find someone who is good at these things.
    FC1922B0-19A3-451D-B2CE-96F8072E86BF.jpeg

    These are the stocks that came with it. I like the size, but hate the finger grooves. I found these stocks harder to grip and access. Unless someone really wants them, I may try modifying them a bit. $10 plus shipping to a good home!
    B49D11FD-3CA0-4C00-B8A6-A3CAEE2851CB.jpeg
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    229
    Beautiful man stopper there Brent. I do love big bore revolvers, since I was little. I got my hands on a Lew Horton 624 in .44 Special. It's my choice for BBQ gun.
    20161210_201344.jpg

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Tidewater,VA
    Posts
    5,029
    AHHHHHH! The old "58", carried an unmodified one for a couple of years before the Nanny boys took over, got the bug from an ever older Customs Agent that worked Gabes neck of the woods and went on to join the first batch of Sky Marshall's. He picked a pair of them and had them cut to 3",rounded the butt, bobbed the hammer, in the early years there was some kind of "reg" that kept them from carrying a semi in some countries, he like me swore but the 210 "police" load. Believe it was the same load carried by San Antonio, or Dallas,
    All animals except man know that the ultimate of life is to enjoy it.

    Samuel Butler


    FACIEM TUAM, DOMINC, REQUIRAM

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Western Washington
    Posts
    282
    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanNobody View Post
    No, but it has a soul nonetheless. I do believe firearms can have souls; polymer-framed firearms not included.

    I have to agree with you. I say the same thing about wood stocked rifles.
    Common sense is not a common virtue!

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