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  1. #1
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    Default Random sh*t workouts

    Most of my workouts consist of standard lifts, but every now and then I like to do a bunch of “random shit”. I was smoked by the end.

    AD59B3B8-4697-4A48-B147-0FE8EA7DF2B2.jpeg
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  2. #2
    If you don't mind, could you please expand on "karate isometrics", Sensei?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunstore Commando View Post
    If you don't mind, could you please expand on "karate isometrics", Sensei?
    The fancy term is “overcoming isometrics”:

    What are overcoming isometrics? Overcoming isometrics involve trying to move an immovable object with maximum effort. These isometric (i.e., no movement) muscle contractions allow you to put every ounce of effort and energy into the movement, which recruits as many motor units and muscle fibers as possible.


    Read the full article here.

    My way of putting it:
    Pushing really fucking hard against something that won’t fucking move.

    I don’t think the idea is anything new, but I don’t know. The term is new to me and I don’t pretend to understand the science. But I do know that old timey strong men used to do these things, as did the karate men of old.

    pushing against the wall, pushing up into a door frame or against the sides of the door frame, pushing your hands against each other, pulling apart or bend a metal bar, stuff like that.

    The article I linked doesn’t go into this detail but some research I have found:
    *The greatest benefit seems to be holding the tension for 6 seconds; less time isn’t as effective and more time doesn’t benefit as much. I don’t know that to be true but it’s what I am doing now.

    *Pushing in one position increases strength at that point, but also increases strength in the range of motion just behind and just ahead of the position. So in other words, if you want to increase strength the whole range of motion for say a bench press, or a punch, you need to push in 3 or 4 different positions along the path.

    *It seems to have an effect on strengthening the connective tissue, not just muscle.

    *Increases mind/muscle connection and control

    *Allows you to contract 100%. I try to do it explosively, going from 0 to 100% immediately. That can be harder than it sounds. But, because there is no movement, it is not so painful on the joints. YMMV of course.

    “Karate isometrics” is just taking karate techniques and applying the idea of pushing against the immovable object at various points along the path of the technique.

    I tend to punch against the cinderblock wall in my dojo, but it was easier to get the selfie using the makiwara...


    Start of the punch (hand can be lower or higher, good to do both). Take a relaxed but structured position, relax the arm, and then explode as though your life depends on driving that fist through the wall. Of course it’s not going anywhere, but your body doesn’t know the difference. (I think it is paramount that you do this explosively. For my purpose, this is not about pushing more weight on a bench press, it’s about creating more explosive power in a strike. A slow push might be strong, but we need speed for power.)
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    Midway through the path, same thing.
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    Towards the end of the punch, same drill.
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    The punch is easy to demonstrate and understand from a selfie picture, but you can do this with many of the other techniques. Some of the “blocking“ techniques for example, these are actually great because one hand can be performing the concentric, or blocking motion, while the other hand providing the resistance is performing hikite (pulling hand). So it’s pretty efficient and covers a lot of positions... positions that we can certainly use in fighting but are kind of difficult to replicate with weights.

    I only have two hands so I can’t take a selfie to illustrate.

    I do 3 or 4 positions through the path. Hold each position for 6 seconds, and generally do 3 reps for each position. I think last night I did around 8 techniques. So at least 24 reps with each hand (keeping in mind that some techniques your other hand provides the resistance, so each arm effectively gets almost double. That’s more math and I want to do right now and I’m tired.

    supposedly this is working and training your nervous system besides just your connective tissue, so if you are really going 100%, it is actually more taxing than you might think. It doesn’t take very long but it’s a good warm-up.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Melbourne, Florida
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    Karate isometrics - excellent description.

    I've been doing that for years. I think, with nothing to back it up, that it's important to breathe while doing it. That's to midigate the chance of raising your blood pressure too much or too fast.

    -- ML

  5. #5
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    I have a budding star middle school wrestler, who has asked that I help him gain strength and size this off season. We have had him on 5/3/1 BBB program but wanted to add to the random s#!t part that when he has wrestled that day, we utilize a slosh pipe and have him do loaded carries with it. 10’ long and 2/3 filled with water. We live on a hill so we have him carry it out and back Zercher, racked, on back, overhead, and snatch grip. It is random and builds cobra strength with the unpredictable sloshing of the water and stability needed to counter it. Thought I’d share

  6. #6
    Thank you, Sensei!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by twinboysdad View Post
    I have a budding star middle school wrestler, who has asked that I help him gain strength and size this off season. We have had him on 5/3/1 BBB program but wanted to add to the random s#!t part that when he has wrestled that day, we utilize a slosh pipe and have him do loaded carries with it. 10’ long and 2/3 filled with water. We live on a hill so we have him carry it out and back Zercher, racked, on back, overhead, and snatch grip. It is random and builds cobra strength with the unpredictable sloshing of the water and stability needed to counter it. Thought I’d share
    Excellent. I think mixing “regular” strength training with “random shit” is important for martial disciplines. I have known lots of body builders that were strong when it comes to picking up iron but just weren’t that strong when it comes to moving people. And known lots of farmers, mechanics, construction guys, etc. that were massively strong in the real world. So a mix of training disciplines is ideal, IMO.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

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