Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Flyover Country
    Posts
    18

    Default Teaching Cross-eye Dominant Kids to Shoot

    So, I'm an instructor for my agency and have dealt with cross-eye dominant adult shooters in the past, but my 8-yo son, and my 6-yo daughter are both right handed and left eye-dominant. I've been doing some intro pistol and rifle work with my son, but I'm wondering if, at this age, I can re-train their eyes to be right side dominant (i.e. put a pirate patch on the left eye when they shoot until the right takes over), or if I should teach them to shoot lefty, like a Phil Mickelson, but in a real sport...

    Mercifully, my other two kids are right eye/right hand...
    Last edited by TrailDave; 06-14-2021 at 08:11 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    16,084
    My eldest boy is that way too! He shoots a pistol right handed (uses isosceles and just used left eye), but shoots a long gun left handed. He just does it.
    I rather you hated me for who I am than love me for who I ain't!
    This Ain't the Movies, and You Ain't John Wayne!

    Sometimes it is entirely appropriate to kill a fly with a 12 pound sledgehammer!
    TRAIN HARD= SOONER OR LATER YOU"LL NEED IT!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    153
    I'm the same way (left eye dominant right hand dominant)
    I always thought its better to train the left side just for the added bonus of being ambidextrous with different long guns. I mean train both obviously but there are a lot of pluses to being cross dominant IMHO.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    6,456
    Some things are only a disability if we view them that way.

    Cross eye dominiance is a great example, because it really is not a disability.

    One could look at it as a disability for shooting with the long gun...but instead, look at it as an opportunity to build the ability to shoot equally well with either eye, based on what you need at the time.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    McKinney
    Posts
    1,790
    Same problem when I was a kid. My dad did put tape over the left side of my safety glasses and after a while I stopped trying to get my face over the (bb) gun to use my left eye.

    Years later, learning to shoot left handed, I still generally use my right eye with a pistol because I simply donít fight it if I can see my sights/ dot. Long guns my left eye takes over and I donít notice it.

    I did have an LT in the army who was apparently unable to overcome left eye dominance that shot his pistol right handed and long guns left hand. Seemed odd but he was a fairly competitive 3 gun shooter who made it work.
    "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act, but a habit." -Aristotle

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    2,704
    I, too, am RH and left-eye dominant. While it really doesn't bother me w/ pistol or rifle, it was an issue for me w/ clay- and wing-shooting. I opted for the Magic Dot system, which works similar to the "piece of tape" approach.
    Waitin' for a squeeze...

    TWOTU Since March 2012

    DPS
    CRG
    AR15/M4 RGF
    HRO-6 CQB
    HRO-7 Team Tactics
    HITS-8 Knife


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Prescott
    Posts
    1,177
    I'm gonna agree with Brent here. i can shoot either eye with only a 1" offset, and have trained using handguns and long guns in both hands. as a handling skill there is not only an advantage to being able to shoulder a rifle or control a pistol in either hand, but tactically speaking, it also has its advantages. my fiance is cross eye dominant as well, but prefers handle a firearm right handed. changing up her stance to make a more natural feel for her to hold a pistol towards her left side was awkward for her at first, but she continues to improve shooting in this manner

    Do NOT call me an armorer
    Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum
    Now I am become Death, the destroyer of all worlds
    People have asked me if I consider myself a good or bad person. The truth of it is, I don't know or care. I have been called both. I like to think I have saved more lives than I have ended. Either way, I can still sleep at night.
    SEMPER FI

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    6,456
    We must be adaptable. Able to shoot with either hand, able to focus with either eye.

    But no matter how hard we train, our bodies have wired a dominant eye for a reason. I think it’s not in our best interest to work against that wiring. Just train so that both eyes can do the job of necessary.

    We are always going to default to our dominant eye under pressure. The only time we should branch to the non-dominant is when circumstances dictate that we must.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    NW Washington
    Posts
    3,009
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    Some things are only a disability if we view them that way.

    Cross eye dominiance is a great example, because it really is not a disability.

    One could look at it as a disability for shooting with the long gun...but instead, look at it as an opportunity to build the ability to shoot equally well with either eye, based on what you need at the time.
    I agree with this as well.

    I also think it's a bit different for kids who are still developing, than it is for adults (who are often set in their ways and resistant to change). I can say that I started teaching one of my sons to shoot at 8, and he's a lefty for the most part but right eye dominant. Right from the start we worked on using either hand and either eye, but at this point he prefers to shoot right handed and use that dominant eye, even though he still uses his left hand for most tasks.

    So, my thought is to teach them to do it right with either hand and eye, and let them work out what they prefer. Just help them not to do weird stuff like leaning their head over a rifle and things like that. What works best for one kid might not be the same as the next one.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    6,456
    Agree; I think best practice is to train both eyes. And start them early whenever possible. Kids that learn the right way from the beginning have such a head start on the rest of us.

    I think we all agree that we want our training and practice to build good habits. My major point, in response to the OP, is to ensure as much as possible our habits are working with nature and not against it.

    A significant part of my early Karate training was trying to beat the flinch response out of me. And I can see how that can be useful in a competition or even dueling context. But I think it is disastrous for real world violence. And yes, nature can be trained out of you to an extent but that doesn’t mean it’s a good thing.

    Eye dominance and flinch response aren’t a perfect comparison but in the sense of fighting nature I see a relationship.

    Of course, lots of our training isn’t NATURAL. We have to LEARN how to use and fight with guns. And sadly our civilization has weeded out a lot of our natural physical and mental instincts. Most animals move perfectly, yet even the best humans must learn how to move. Still, I think our methods should incorporate natural abilities as much as possible.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •