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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    SE TX
    Posts
    1,563
    Revolvers remain comforting, when one side’s thumb/hand/wrist do not age well, to the point of no longer being trusted to provide a stable platform for cycling an autoloader. A Glock remains nice, of course, for one’s “new strong side.”

    Actually, I grew up left-handed, but right-armed. Wrote lefty; threw righty. So, the draw felt natural when done right-handed, especially with the L-Frames I had to learn to use, during police academy training, with the then-mandated low-slung duty holsters. Like many lefties, I was/am reasonably ambidextrous, so simply learned long-stroke double-action with both hands. The right hip is generally more accessible when seated inside patrol vehicles, and personal vehicles. So, primary at 0300 became the norm, for 35+ years, with the second gun positioned for lefty access. So, the only thing changing is that I am starting to consider the lefty gun to be “more primary” than before.

    I have been blessed to accumulate 2.75” and 4” Speed Sixes, 3” to 6” GP100 sixguns, 2.25” and 3” SP101 fiveguns, all .357 Mag, and 2” .38 K-Frames. Life is good.
    Have Colt, will travel.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Harrisburg, MO
    Posts
    1,394
    Life is good indeed! The left hand snubby is a tactically solid idea from back in the day that still holds up. During ride alongs back in the 80's my cop friend would always approach the car with his left hand casually in his pocket...wrapped around a hammerless Smithy. Lesson learned.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    5,162
    Quote Originally Posted by Winchester67 View Post
    Good Lord. My friend, you are officially old. Not that it is a bad thing...in fact, it is your Christian Duty to go forth and explain the Gospel.
    Effing A. Finally freed this one from phone jail:

    OP.jpg
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I rode the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer (as modified)

    "What cannot be remedied must be endured."

    Vale et omnia quae.

    P:20

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Harrisburg, MO
    Posts
    1,394
    Always liked the sights on the Colts better than the Smith and Wesson models. Since I have a Cobra roadster, when the local gunshop owner got this Cobra in on a trade he called me up with predictable results....
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Harrisburg, MO
    Posts
    1,394
    Running the risk of thread drift, here is a longer shot of the Cobra revolver backdrop. The car that made me give up motorcycles after 30 accident free years.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    1,400
    Quote Originally Posted by Winchester67 View Post
    Running the risk of thread drift, here is a longer shot of the Cobra revolver backdrop. The car that made me give up motorcycles after 30 accident free years.
    Very nice! Which maker is it?

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Harrisburg, MO
    Posts
    1,394
    Thanks. It is a Backdraft, out of South Africa. Basically, they are factory built and painted there, then sent to their dealers in the States where the customer can select the engine and transmission of their choice. By importing it without the naughty bits, it is not a "car" says the Gub'ment, so it does not have to comply with modern safety or emissions standards. So basically, it is a 1965 model without being 56 years old so the suspension bushings are not worn out and and the wiring is not crispy I am not fighting rust at every turn. It has a Tremec 5 speed transmission and a 345 horsepower 302 Ford Small Block engine. The Shelby's back in 1962 got by with a 271 Horse Ford 289, so this one makes a little more power than the cars that made the legend real without being a nose heavy big block. Which means it still drives like the English sports cars I grew up driving only it has power and will always start. All in all, an ideal toy car for a guy like me and the perfect 50th birthday gift from my long suffering wife, whom I believe should be nominated for Sainthood after putting up with me.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    8,748
    Quote Originally Posted by Winchester67 View Post
    At the risk of starting a sentence like my Grandfather would, things really were different then. We are in the Golden Age now. Things probably won't get "better" in terms of defensive sidearms until the laser beam is perfected. An RMR Glock (with a proper slide milling, not a high mount MOS) represents the highest refinement in a sidearm in history, and that is a history in which a Gentleman always carried a sidearm. When I was a young man, well, we didn't have it so good. Take for example my old "Driving Rig". Shoulder holsters so the draw was not hampered by safety belts. Matching Smith and Wesson three inch round butt Model 65s. That is the K-Frame .357 Magnum for you younger members of the audience. (which, by the way, I am glad you are here. No need to re-invent the wheel, so listening to our mistakes is a valuable tool). Why these guns in this rig? Well, remember, back then a CCW was not so common. So lots of guys, good men mind you, elected to obey the law. So the driving rig was a force multiplier for me...basically, anyone with me back then could operate a revolver, even if they were not "gun guys". While most of my friends were "gun guys" being able to hand off a revolver to a passenger meant they were a help, or at the very least, not defenseless if all their skill set allowed was for them to "Stay down and stay put". As for why these guns, well, it was a different time. The K frame three inch gun was the end of the line in terms of evolution in my opinion. It was as good as a wheel gun could get. The longer barrel not only offered a little more velocity over the two in standard snubby, but more importantly it offered an extraction stroke long enough to clear the empty shells from the gun. The round but is very concealable, and VERY comfortable. A round butt four inch gun would have been even better, but they were not in the catalog at the time. Fixed sights were snag free, yet easy to see as the front sight on the three inch guns was wider than the two inch "standard" snubby. This was it, back then as far as I am concerned. Good Lord, I am better protected now with my Suarez International RMR Glock 19. But I still remember the path to that pistol and thought some of you might as well. Sorry for the low quality pic. I will take some better ones later. This was just the one I had.
    Idk, that’s pretty damn cool to me... You were even thinking back then, you carried two of them...
    Nothing says Fuck You like a shotgun.....

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    CA via NM, TX, WY, & Born in Arkansas
    Posts
    17

    Cool Men once declared their "colors".

    Men declared their "colors". Federal HST .45 ACP Cufflinks and Tie Clasp Flowers

    il_570xN.1965270759_7q2p.jpg

    10f9bd3aecf1b893fc6e73cb8386b6cd.jpg
    “The laws that forbid the carrying of arms are laws of such a nature. They disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes…. Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man.”
    – Thomas Jefferson, Commonplace Book (quoting 18th century criminologist Cesare Beccaria), 1774-1776

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Southeast United States
    Posts
    910
    Quote Originally Posted by Papa View Post
    Effing A. Finally freed this one from phone jail:

    OP.jpg
    Quite the fighting pistola. All it needs - IMHO - is a Tyler T-Grip. lol

    I had one of these in its more original state when I was in the Army back in the day. Nickel plated, never shot it, kept it in the arms room most of the time. Traded it for a satin nickel Combat Commander. Wish I still had both of them.
    Redneck Zen
    "Be careful what you get good at."

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