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Thread: Snake shot....

  1. #31
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    Sometimes hands-on is much more satisfying.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I rode the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer (as modified)

    "What cannot be remedied must be endured."

    Vale et omnia quae.

    P:20

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigEd63 View Post
    I don't have much faith anymore in CCI Shot Shells. At least not in a real short barrel like my 442.
    Damn capsule didn't fragment at all and punched a hole through one side of an interior door, after bouncing up from the floor. Field mouse in house and the freaking thing pissed me off.
    Agreed on the shot shells for 38/357 and 9mm.

    I have personal experience with the 40 S&W and 45 ACP CCI shot shells though and they are a completely different story. They pattern well out of an OEM Glock gen 1-4 barrel (the lack of sharp rifling edges is an improvement here compared to conventional rifling), they cycle the slide, and are fully capable of turning a snake head into hamburger at double normal snake-shooting distance. I've carried both, using a single round in the chamber over a magazine full of good hollow points, and that's been a great combo for me in snake country.

    I've heard a few people say they don't cycle the slide in their guns, but IMO they're either talking about the 9mm version or severely limp-wristing the gun; the 40 and 45 versions are well above the minimum recoil needed to cycle the slide and it says on the box they are designed to cycle. For clarity, these don't have the blue capsules, the shot is completely enclosed inside the aluminum casing, and the front of the case is shaped like a bullet.

  3. #33
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    I have tried several brands of snake gaiters. For me the most comfortable ones are made by Turtleskin. They are good against briars and all the debris that gets into your boots, too. You can find them cheaper if you shop around.
    https://turtleskin.com/default/outdo...e-gaiters.html
    Dave

    "If your sport does not put grease, blood, or dirt under your fingernails, then it's just a game!"

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redbug View Post
    I have tried several brands of snake gaiters. For me the most comfortable ones are made by Turtleskin. They are good against briars and all the debris that gets into your boots, too. You can find them cheaper if you shop around.
    https://turtleskin.com/default/outdo...e-gaiters.html
    Chainsaw chaps might offer some protection. I do wear a common brand of leggings that wear out. The are good for water moccasin bites, I am not sure of it stopping a strike form a large rattle snake. The force of getting hit by a sizable rattle snake is like getting kicked very hard. Quail hunters often get into contact with rattle snakes.
    Below a likely staged encounter between a smaller southern diamond back rattler and a larger water moccasin.

  5. #35
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    My experience with snake shot is that it is only moderately effective, and only so at a distance where some of the bigger snakes can bite you too. It also has the potential to tear up your barrel. Gabe's suggestion of a small shot gun is significantly better idea all around.

    Carry a pistol for two legged critters. Everything else in that AO can be handled with an appropriately loaded shotgun or suitably sized rifle.

    ETA: Yes, copperhead and cotton mouths can be aggressive snakes, but I think typically that's because you don't see them until you step on them. I'd be aggressive too if someone stepped on me.

    The eastern diamond back and other rattle snakes around here are somewhat reclusive, and come with the added benefit of an early detection system. Just don't stick your hand where you can't see, and 8/10 you'll be fine. Your dogs might get tagged on the nose occasionally, but they typically fair better than a human does with a snake bite
    Last edited by H60DoorGunner; 02-23-2021 at 08:18 AM.
    Isaiah 54:17

    Deus dea traballo, dixo o enterrador.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigEd63 View Post
    I've taken out two with a hand held brush cutter saw blade attachment. And another two with a 6ft pry bar. Last one was perfect shot placement driving the head right into the ground.
    No poisonous snakes within a few miles of my parent's house (lots of big black snakes, some over 6 or 7 ft.) and dad hated to kill the regular snakes.

    Sometimes he did, by accident, when trimming along the creek or over the hill from the garden. That big green machine string trimmer would cut the head off the smaller ones and almost cut the heads off the bigger ones. If he was swinging that trimmer across in front of him wound up at several thousand rpm and that snake raised it's head up, it was all over.

    Not that I'd carry a weed eater in the woods or while wading the river smallmouth bass fishing, but when you're out doing the weed eating, they'll tear up a snake if you've got one with the heavy line in the head.

    Having said that, if I was in the habit of finding "bad" snakes while weed eating I'd have the Ruger in my back pocket.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redbug View Post
    I have tried several brands of snake gaiters. For me the most comfortable ones are made by Turtleskin. They are good against briars and all the debris that gets into your boots, too. You can find them cheaper if you shop around.
    https://turtleskin.com/default/outdo...e-gaiters.html
    I'm a fan of gaiters for many reasons besides snakes, and many climates. They are great for keeping snow out of your boots in the winter.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by H60DoorGunner View Post
    My experience with snake shot is that it is only moderately effective, and only so at a distance where some of the bigger snakes can bite you too. It also has the potential to tear up your barrel.

    LOL, what? Please explain how a thimble-full of lead shot has the potential to "tear up your barrel"?

    And what snake shot do you have experience with? Some is very effective, some is not. That's a bit like saying "hollow points don't work".

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by H60DoorGunner View Post
    My experience with snake shot is that it is only moderately effective, and only so at a distance where some of the bigger snakes can bite you too. It also has the potential to tear up your barrel. Gabe's suggestion of a small shot gun is significantly better idea all around.

    Carry a pistol for two legged critters. Everything else in that AO can be handled with an appropriately loaded shotgun or suitably sized rifle.

    ETA: Yes, copperhead and cotton mouths can be aggressive snakes, but I think typically that's because you don't see them until you step on them. I'd be aggressive too if someone stepped on me.

    The eastern diamond back and other rattle snakes around here are somewhat reclusive, and come with the added benefit of an early detection system. Just don't stick your hand where you can't see, and 8/10 you'll be fine. Your dogs might get tagged on the nose occasionally, but they typically fair better than a human does with a snake bite
    Not all rattlesnakes will warn prior to striking. Especially hard to do if they have no rattle. Mowers often cut off the tails of snakes.
    Here is a water moccasin killed May 2017 that appears to be missing its tail. There just to show that losing the tail is possible. Normally there is a small stubby pointed tail on a moccasin. It is not there on this one.

    DSCF0836.jpg
    DSCF0839.jpg

  10. #40
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    snake-from-toilet-mother-defends-child-texas__oPt.jpg


    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...found-23-more/
    Jason McFadden was at work one morning in late January when he got a text message from his wife, Cassie.

    “What the crap do I do?” it read.

    That text was followed by a picture — of a rattlesnake inside a toilet at their Texas home.
    Last edited by barnetmill; 02-24-2021 at 07:59 AM.

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