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Thread: Scoping my M1A

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    408

    Default Scoping my M1A

    I have an early Springfield Armory M1A (USGI parts) that I bought years ago to shoot high power with. ( In reality I just wanted one because). It is a loaded, stainless model with the hooded rear sight. I added a titanium nitride gas piston and bedded the action in the original DOD stock. ( It even has the cut out for the fun switch). The rifle shoots very,very well. I also picked up one of the SA aluminum scope mounts. I mounted it once but it shot loose(I did not install it properly, go figure). The rifle is more than accurate enough to warrant optics, so I decided to do it right this time. Honestly, I have an aversion to taking a rubber hammer to my firearms, but I did as told in this case. I also noticed that the windage adjustment was set so that it prevented the mount from seating flat against the receiver. I adjusted the screw and followed the instruction to hammer the mount into the receiver. It took four hammer sessions before it reached the point where I could no longer tighten the screw. Then I properly adjusted the windage screw. I had a Super Sniper 10x42 and a Vortex Viper sitting in the safe, and decided to use the SS scope. I picked that scope because, since it is a rear focus model, I could invert the scope using the windage as elevation thus avoiding the possibility of ejected brass hitting the knob. Also the thing is practically indestructible. I used Burris Signature low rings to mount the scope and torqued everything down to specs. I wanted to install a bipod which brought into play another problem. In order to properly mount a stud in the stock, I had to remove it. I practice as if I were in the field, which for me, means a ruck or a bipod on the ground. If I removed the stock, there existed the very real possibility l would damage the bedding, one of the things that makes this rifle so very accurate in the first place. If it ain't broke don't fix it is a thing I live by. I ended up getting one of the USGI bipods that mounts to the gas block. Not ideal, I know, but it has worked out fine for me. I built a custom leather cheek piece to fit me, but decided not to use it, because it prevents me from using those excellent NM iron sights, the thing I like about the Springfield mount. I also built a custom butt pad as the length of pull is a little bit short for me. So far, so good. No loose scope mount. It is fun to get out with the old girl, and it reminded me how accurate she really is.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    2,857
    Hello ronlassit, Sounds like a great set up you have there. When I was an Army Ranger, my primary sniper rifle was an XM-21 that was further accurized at Fort Benning and it was an amazing shooting tool. One of the things I learned while at the Quantico Scout-Sniper School (I attended shortly after Gunny Hathcock left the school, I had the cadre he trained instructing my class), is to use a tripod of our own construction to support the rifle when not using a rucksack (mostly on stalks and such). This tripod can be duplicated with wooden arrow shafts bound together and about 16"-18" long. With this tripod as a rest, the rifle is quite stable and you have the added advantage of quickly shifting from 'target' to 'target' AND panning for target leads. This tripod was a small, narrow package and did not catch on things like a tripod affixed to the rifle would (and did not add weight to the rifle). Another advantage with this sit-up is that the barrel/action harmonics did not change, so no shift in POI. I have made many incredible and notable shots with that '21, both day and night. Great shooting tool.
    "When one goes willingly into the darkness, all he will find there, is what he brought in with him".

    --Gabe Suarez, after the 7-11 shootout

    Proper development of the 'Warrior Spirit', training and physical conditioning before 'The Event' cannot be overstated.

    U.S. Army Rangers (1/75 'Old Scroll')
    CRG; 0-5 Feet CRG; PSP Pistol; FOF Instructor School; Combat Pistol Instructor School

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    518
    Quote Originally Posted by KarlinPhoenix View Post
    Hello ronlassit, Sounds like a great set up you have there. When I was an Army Ranger, my primary sniper rifle was an XM-21 that was further accurized at Fort Benning and it was an amazing shooting tool. One of the things I learned while at the Quantico Scout-Sniper School (I attended shortly after Gunny Hathcock left the school, I had the cadre he trained instructing my class), is to use a tripod of our own construction to support the rifle when not using a rucksack (mostly on stalks and such). This tripod can be duplicated with wooden arrow shafts bound together and about 16"-18" long. With this tripod as a rest, the rifle is quite stable and you have the added advantage of quickly shifting from 'target' to 'target' AND panning for target leads. This tripod was a small, narrow package and did not catch on things like a tripod affixed to the rifle would (and did not add weight to the rifle). Another advantage with this sit-up is that the barrel/action harmonics did not change, so no shift in POI. I have made many incredible and notable shots with that '21, both day and night. Great shooting tool.
    Id like to see a picture of your tripod if you still have it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    I have my M14 set up similar. Though I have a Sadlak mount and ARMS rings.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badger View Post
    Id like to see a picture of your tripod if you still have it.
    If I can find it, I will post an image for you.
    "When one goes willingly into the darkness, all he will find there, is what he brought in with him".

    --Gabe Suarez, after the 7-11 shootout

    Proper development of the 'Warrior Spirit', training and physical conditioning before 'The Event' cannot be overstated.

    U.S. Army Rangers (1/75 'Old Scroll')
    CRG; 0-5 Feet CRG; PSP Pistol; FOF Instructor School; Combat Pistol Instructor School

  6. #6
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    Agree with the Jungle Fix Tripod. When I attended FBI Sniper School the Harris Bipod was the rage. The Gunny Highway looking Agent teaching it...one Ron Frigulti, suggested the homemade tripod, or a simple ruck sack. The Harris is fine for the range on a free float AR...but on other weapons...the Ruck rest is preferred.

    Scopes? Scopes are like red heads vs blondes...everyone has an opinion. Mine?

    Leupold Mildot/TMR system in the 3-9 or 4.5-12
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  7. #7
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    Aug 2008
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    Richmond, VA
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    I wouldn't use the bipod that attaches to the gas cylinder. It will just move the barrel around and negate some of the good effects of the bedding job.

    Lots of opinion out there about what is a good, or the best, scope mount for an M1A.

    I've had mine for over 40 years and I never take it off the rifle. I wonder sometimes if that's one of the things that cause people to have scope mount issues - taking off/putting in on, taking it off/putting it on, etc., etc., etc. No good reason to take it off.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    F865779E-D0FA-4FEF-9927-C81C103025AA.jpg
    To me that stock is the way to finish yours. It can be properly bedded and free floated. The OG stocks arnt ridged enough to support a bi pod. Iíve had a couple, and both were great rifles and one of the highest on the list I wish I didnít sell. One was a super match that shot better then I could(6Ē swinging plates at 750yards) the other a loaded standard with stainless barrel I had bedded and tuned up. The biggest problem you will have is keeping it free floated with any kind of weight on the fore end of the stock. I like them, they are definitely a pain in the ass to set up and not very cheap for a good setup. I think my super match had a gen 3 mount and my other one I think I reused it. I never had any issues, I ran m1 or m3 luepoldes and never had problems with brass hitting the knobs...
    Last edited by chad newton; 02-13-2021 at 10:59 AM.
    Nothing says Fuck You like a shotgun.....

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    I did the exact same thing your doing with yours. Having a good trigger is nice but the barrel is where all the magic happends. It should be a hart or Barnett and either with group just fine. I used to only shoot 168g Sierra match through both of them, I never used to reload for them. Only thing to check with that stock is to rest it in different spots with a rest and ruck and check poi at 100yards. See if anything changes that way you can fix it. I will add my ejected brass would hit the mount. Just remembered...
    Nothing says Fuck You like a shotgun.....

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