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Thread: Large revolvers

  1. #31
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    Apr 2007
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    Barnetmill and Papa - what you say makes a lot of sense. I remember reading as a kid (pre-Glock) things along the lines of the 1911 is a great gun but must be cleaned and maintained more than a revolver. There also was a lot of concern about the safe carrying of a 1911 ( maybe there were a lot of 'em around with worn sears or hammers?) to the point that many proponents of them recommended carrying them cocked and locked/Condition 1 only in thumb break holsters.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by cco45acp View Post
    Barnetmill and Papa - what you say makes a lot of sense. I remember reading as a kid (pre-Glock) things along the lines of the 1911 is a great gun but must be cleaned and maintained more than a revolver. There also was a lot of concern about the safe carrying of a 1911 ( maybe there were a lot of 'em around with worn sears or hammers?) to the point that many proponents of them recommended carrying them cocked and locked/Condition 1 only in thumb break holsters.
    The disconnector is in my experience what will wear. I once got a got deal on a 1911 because the disconnector was worn. I knew when I bought it that it was bad because I tested it prior to buying; hammer would follow the slide down with finger on the trigger. In those days a disconnector was two dollars. It had an excellent trigger pull and had just been shot a lot. A poor trigger job and yes the sear and hammer would need attention.
    On a real light trigger job the hammer could jar off the sear. Now days there are real light triggers on some 1911 guns and I do not know how it is done.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by cco45acp View Post
    Barnetmill and Papa - what you say makes a lot of sense. I remember reading as a kid (pre-Glock) things along the lines of the 1911 is a great gun but must be cleaned and maintained more than a revolver. There also was a lot of concern about the safe carrying of a 1911 ( maybe there were a lot of 'em around with worn sears or hammers?) to the point that many proponents of them recommended carrying them cocked and locked/Condition 1 only in thumb break holsters.
    On a WWII GI 1911 you could shake it and hear the parts rattle. They were minute of a man's abdomen at 7 yards with an 8lb or more trigger. The looseness along FMJ made them reliable man killers at close range.
    one's fitted out for target shooting have to be tighter and maybe less tolerant of dirt.

  4. #34
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    Oct 2003
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    The "Walther" PP was my first service gun in the police force ( it was the famous P 38 when I served in the German Army before) . The PP was reliable except for the weak .32 auto.
    beware of the man who shoots one gun.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by alamo View Post
    The "Walther" PP was my first service gun in the police force ( it was the famous P 38 when I served in the German Army before) . The PP was reliable except for the weak .32 auto.
    I am not disagreeing with you, but just thinking, .32 revolvers and automatics are issued weapons to many police forces for many years. I have always wondered why that was so.

  6. #36
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    Long story I think. The PP and PPk were issued to German police in the late 1920 s. In those days they were an inovation regarding reliability compared to other guns like the famous Mauser 08. FMJ ammo was standard ammo. Nobody was thinking about stopping power. According to my father, who served in an armed organisation since 1934, only penetration power was an issue. After WW II nothing has changed in Germany until the infamous "RAF" (Red Army Fraction) or " Bader-Meinhoff Bande" appeared on the scene. After the first gun fights with the police it was obvious that FMJ ammo and .32 auto ammo were not appropriate for the police.
    beware of the man who shoots one gun.

  7. #37
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    Light recoil, accuracy, reliability, low muzzle blast and noise. The typical PP is very flat and light for a steel gun. And it feels right even in a large adult male's hand.

    The perceived and actual threats and military practices for the US and UK were different from that of most colonial powers, as was the American policing experience in the mid and far West.

    There were few juramentados on the streets of Weimar Berlin.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

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  8. #38
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    Below is one huge revolver.
    This was a 10 gauge colt shotgun cut down to become a 10 ga cap and ball revolver.

    The owner apparently did use it in combat against Mescalero Apache, but did not survive the battle even through the gun was fired.



    Built for "Prairie Preacher" Frank Foley. Foley didn't keep a journal but did write notes on loose papers he acquired. Dates were months and years, he filled space but made little attempt to maintain any sense of order. He was an Irish imigrant (1848) who didn't get along with the Church of England. He was a traveling Minister in the New Mexico/Arizona territory 1850 - 1871. He owned the Colt 1855 Revolving Shotgun, for protection and use to get his meals while traveling between towns, mining camps and homesteads. He was a paning for silver along the Rio Pecos in 1863 when the shotgun barrel was bent using it a a pry bar but it is unknow why or on what. It remained in "difficult use" for several months but he couldn't afford to replace it. South of Ft Stanton in Bonita, a Blacksmith parishioner did the conversion for free. The one piece grip was made from the butt stock but the brass embellishment were added sometime later. The P.P., Crosses and Foley were added without engraving. He regretted his P.P. & his name on it the second he saw it actually in place as vanity but left it to show he too has been weak. The pistol was effective on small game and less menacing for his appearance as a Man of God. Regardless, the unusual handgun and its owner were well know on their Circuit.

    Fort Stanton Archive Patrol Report of Lieutenant2 D. Pritchett B Co: May 2nd 1871 Patrol came across a pillaged camp site along the Rio Hondo where a Bible and papers bearing the name Franklin Foley (above info) were found. A search for Foley and his horse was unsuccessful. Pistol was found half mile from the camp on the second day and with fired caps in place. Foley's documents and pistol were delivered to the Post Commander and the report suggests Mescalero Apache were responsible. CO Endorsement. Mr Foley is known to me but his fate is not. No actionable information other than conducting a limited search which was done. Major R.L. Grayston, Commanding. Then Feburary 15th 1872 Property of Mr FFoley 1pistol 1Bible disposed of to the John Beaumont family, destitute settlers, heading California as best interests of the U.S. Calvary. D. PRICHETT Lieutenant, B Co.

    Its assumed that the Beaumonts were successful in their journey and the pistol served them well which may have lead to the FRANK P.P. engraving on one or both Crosses. Additional embellishments and engraving followed in suit, JWB may be John Beaumont thought Geo K. has no possible linkage. Mr F. Able sold the piece with documentation in 1992. And this is how I would fill in the back story. Lol

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Papa View Post
    If Smith would build a +P true Model 12.
    What's a Model 12? That some other new-fangled idea you kids have come up with?

    102_6015.jpg

  10. #40
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    Here are my two big revolvers. A 1918 Colt New Service in .45 Colt with US Army markings on the butt and a lanyard ring. It came with the stag/jigged bone grips (I can't tell which they are but they look custom, have pencil marking on the reverse side, ) and I fitted it with a Tyler T-grip.

    The other is a neglected and pitted but mechanically perfect S&W Model 28 Highway Patrolman, recessed chambers, the old Magna grips and again, the venerable Tyler T-grip. This thing has a fine double and single action trigger and shoots like a laser, feels soft in the hand compared to my .357 J-frames. Imagine that.

    The Tyler T-grips make both guns fit my hand way better than the factory options. The large Colt frame feels like it's configured for gorilla hands and the usual large wood grips on the S&W N-frames just suck IMHO. I only shoot cowboy loads in the Colt because it's so flippin' old and I have no need to abuse it. The Smith, on the other hand, looks like crap -- my friend's father had dementia and let it get wet ... long story -- and is not a collector, so I don't mind shooting fast loads in it.

    Except for J-frame and Colt snubbies I'm not much of a revolver guy, just wanted something to keep familiarity and have some fun with. They could be used for defense or hunting (especially the big Smith) if needed, but I don't even have holsters for them. Perhaps one day.

    20200817_144952.jpg
    2013-03-21 19.09.11.jpg
    The Smith and Wesson Highway Patrolman pre-Tyler T-Grip
    20200120_151903(1)~2.jpg
    A Colt New Service .45 and its little brothers, a .38 Agent and a pre-war Colt Woodsman, IMHO one of if not the best .22 rimfire pistol ever made. And yes, I shoot it. A lot.
    Redneck Zen
    "Be careful what you get good at."

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