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  1. #1

    Default Straight Key Night 2020

    http://youtu.be/hop6DfJPpkM
    This is a video of this year's Straight Key Night. Text of Morse code with explanations is after the description on the YouTube page. Text of Morse without explanations follows immediately after end credits.
    WA2WMR
    WA2WMR on QRZ.com
    ARRL Field Day 2012
    Hope is when you buy a lottery ticket.

  2. #2
    Thanks for sharing. I am attempting to learn code...any tips? Thankful it's not required for the test any longer.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hector Knuckinfuzz View Post
    Thanks for sharing. I am attempting to learn code...any tips? Thankful it's not required for the test any longer.
    Morse code is about conditioning a response based upon pattern recognition.

    Example: The character "V" (. . . _)is the easiest to learn. To learn that character you'll need a lined note pad and a ball point pen. Just like grade school when you had to write "I will not misbehave" a hundred times. Begin at the top of the page:
    1. With the pen , tap three dots followed by a dash, then write the character "V" (without the quotes).
    2. Continue with the pen. Write Dit Dit Dit Dah, then the character "V".
    3. Then go back to the three dots followed by the dash, then the character "V".
    4. Continue down the page until the lines are full.
    5. Do the same with three new characters a day, every day.

    This is conditioning you to write the letter "V" every time you hear the three dits and a dah pattern. The reason it's the easiest to learn is that this pattern is opening of Beethoven's 5th symphony, a pattern we already recognize.
    Last edited by Cacti Rat; 01-13-2021 at 12:47 PM.

  4. #4
    When I learned it for the test, I used the ARRL booklet Learning Morse Code (at least that's what I think it was called - this was back in '62). I don't see it in the line-up of ARRL publications any more. Basically it taught it groups of five letters. Then when I walked down the street (I lived in a city) I would look at signs and read off in didah ("a") format any letters I had already learned. I also had a borrowed WW2 hf received to listen to W1AW code practice sessions. The ARRL still runs daily code practice sessions so that is still available. Also, the Straight Key Century Club (SKCC) has code practice files that are very interesting - War of the Worlds, Gettysburg Address, Alice in Wonderland.
    Cacti Rat has it right - it's muscle memory. When you hear didididah, you instantly write "V". Good luck and keep at it.
    WA2WMR on QRZ.com
    ARRL Field Day 2012
    Hope is when you buy a lottery ticket.

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