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  1. #1
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    Default .22 LR ammo selection for the GS.

    So 22ís as I said in another thread are finicky beasts. I spent a lot of years shooting IHMSA competition and I always loved the small bore classes I competed in.

    One thing I learned early on was that each gun was a rule unto itself when it came to ammo it liked. Some guns would prefer RWS R50, Eley 10x or something other spendy high end competition round and others shot better with things like the lowly Winchester T22. I know one shooter that won consistently in International Production class shooting a 10Ē bull barreled MK2 with a reworked factory trigger and cheap federal ammunition that he ran through a rim gage a case at a time.

    Here are a few things to consider when testing ammo

    1. Trigger. If you donít have a decent clean crisp trigger you are just playing at the game. A clean consistent break is necessary (where have we heard this before). A good trigger isnít that expensive and they drop in.

    2. Scope magnification. You are testing am I here so more is better. You want to take out all the possible margin of error in aiming. I prefer something in the 24-36x magnification range. If you donít have one of these ask around and borrow one or buy one. Honestly a Tasco works just fine. Get the eye relief set correctly and the cross hairs leveled and adjust the parallax. Remember this is ammo testing and you can put on the scope you will use later.

    3. Ammo choices. Every gun is different. Better accuracy is Unusually obtained from higher end target ammo but not always so donít be ashamed to try some cheaper ammo. I used to have a Remington Mode 37 with a 10x Unertal thy shot better with the old Remington gold bullet load than anything else and I must have tried 25+ loads on her. Target loads are for the most part subsonic which gives you the the added advantage of less sound signature. Once you settle on a load buy as much as you can afford and from the same lot number.

    4. Ammo sorting. There are a couple of schools of thought on this. One is gage everything g with a rim thickness from Sinclair. Another is to sort by weight and the last is to do both. Not going to lie itís boring as hell and very tedious. I fall into the run thickness school of doing things. Back in the day we played with weighing each round but were not gettin enough statistical variation to make a difference. The Sinclair rim thickness gage is the one I have always used and I am sure there are others. It lets you drop the round in and slide the scale over till it stops and is graduated from 1-10. We normally put the 1-2ís and the 9-10ís together and kept them for fouling shots after cleaning. All the other went into a tray for each measurement. One additional trick is to orient the head stamp the same way every tone for more consistent measurement.

    5. Bench technique. Watching most people shoot off a bench makes my personal Baby Jesus cry. As Gabe has said donít be a cheap Charlie when selecting things line your trigger, RDS, barrel and a lot of other things on your guns. Donít try to test off a sand bag on top of an ammo can or your pack. If you do I would line to quite Col Boyd. You are ďjust stroking the BishopĒ. Get a proper front and rear rear and the correct bags for them. Take the time and learn proper bench technique. If you donít know either get on YouTube and learn or find someone to teach you.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Excellent!
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  3. #3
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    How does rim thickness effect things? Is the idea to try and put the bullet in the same place as much as possible in the lands?
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    In a word yes.

    What you are trying to do is head space each round exactly the same.
    I carry two kinds of trauma kits. One for fixing it and one for causing it.

  5. #5
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    Interesting stuff to say the least, I haven't pushed my 22lr past the 100 yard mark.

    On the other hand my 22wmr is lights out at 100 yards with a 25x scope

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  6. #6
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    .22rimfire LR has some deficits in design relative to accuracy. The biggie is that it uses a healed bullet that must be crimped. The uniformity of the base is essential to accuracy.



    The nature of the priming is another problem. It has already been mentioned about rim thickness of what is a balloon case. Uniform application of the priming compound is another. It is amazing just how accurate a .22 lr can be in spite of the above.

  7. #7
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    Non uniform primer compound does not effect accuracy. It either goes bang or it doesn’t. What it does effect is do you get a misfire. With the higher end ammunition there is much more uniform distribution of the priming compound and misfires are very rare. And honestly who cares. We are talking GS here. God forbid you get a misfire just replace the recalcitrant round with a new one and get on with it.

    I do not see the heeled bullett as an issue. Apparently neither do the accuracy freaks that shoot 22lr benchreat competition or Olympic gold medalists.
    I carry two kinds of trauma kits. One for fixing it and one for causing it.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by barnetmill View Post
    .22rimfire LR has some deficits in design relative to accuracy. The biggie is that it uses a healed bullet that must be crimped. The uniformity of the base is essential to accuracy.



    The nature of the priming is another problem. It has already been mentioned about rim thickness of what is a balloon case. Uniform application of the priming compound is another. It is amazing just how accurate a .22 lr can be in spite of the above.

    Your picture is a bad misrepresentation of what a 22 LR bullet actually looks like. They are actually much closer to full diameter inside the (very thin) case wall, and obturate in the bore to engage the rifling. The bullet in your pic was obviously damaged in some way, either by pulling it out of the case or somebody grinding the heel down.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hasher View Post
    Non uniform primer compound does not effect accuracy. It either goes bang or it doesnít. What it does effect is do you get a misfire. With the higher end ammunition there is much more uniform distribution of the priming compound and misfires are very rare. And honestly who cares. We are talking GS here. God forbid you get a misfire just replace the recalcitrant round with a new one and get on with it.

    I do not see the heeled bullett as an issue. Apparently neither do the accuracy freaks that shoot 22lr benchreat competition or Olympic gold medalists.
    These are issues.
    and I also said
    It is amazing just how accurate a .22 lr can be in spite of the above.
    The typical bench rest shooting I am aware for .22 rim fire is 50 yards.
    Typically, if you can shoot five-shot groups at 50 yards that are under .25 inch CTC, you have a really good gun.Ē He adds that there are a couple of advantages of rimfire over centerfire: ďYou get to shoot more; you donít have to invest time in reloading ammunition; and you only need 50 yards to practice.Ē
    https://www.ssusa.org/articles/2016/...with-a-22-cal/
    Ranges for center fire bench are fired at much longer distances and IIRC the winning group sizes are routinely smaller.
    ARPC - Centerfire Benchrest Matches

    www.amarillorpc.com õ centerfire-benchrest-matches



    This match is designed to allow centerfire rifle shooters to test the accuracy of their rifles in a structured match setting emulating 100 and 200 yard NBRSA score ...




    600 Yard Bench Rest - Bench Rest Rifle Club of St. Louis

    www.shootingstl.com õ 600-yard-bench-rest






    Stl Bench Rest Rifle Club Bench Rest Centerfire - 600 Yard ... Our matches are divided into two separate categories: Light Gun and Heavy Gun. There are two ...


    https://brocksgap.com/matches-100yd-...ard-benchrest/
    Scores for a club in Alabama Shot at 100 yards

    Screenshot_2020-09-13 100-yard Benchrest.jpg

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