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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    13
    Brothers,
    Here is a 2 part sermon by
    a reformed baptist Pastor from Georgia.
    Pastor John Weaver. My family did some handgun training
    with him and his wife (they were the instructors).
    Topic " Authority " enjoy.
    part 1of 2
    https://www.sermonaudio.com/saplayer...62620174283010
    Part 2 of 2
    https://www.sermonaudio.com/saplayer...=7420246374415

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Exiled in Texas
    Posts
    7,265
    In the context of church, it's a difficult call. I'm content with how my own church has handled it. I was in disagreement with the decision to close the doors during the initial lockdown (in April or so) which lasted about six weeks. Everyone seemed to think it would just be a couple of weeks, and then we'd be back to normal. Then it stretched on and eventually reached a breaking point. We reopened the doors, but roped off every other pew and added a third service in order to space people out. At no point did we mandate masks. There are a few older people who choose to wear masks themselves, but there is no expectation that everyone do so. The third service and roped-off pews lasted for two or three weeks, then we abandoned that and just went back to normal. Now the remaining awkwardness is just trying to figure out whether to hug someone, shake their hand, fist bump, or just wave.

    I confess a certain disappointment in many of the older members of our congregation. I was surprised by how many exhibited genuine fear of the Chin Flu. A Christian should emboldened by the knowledge that their time on earth is decided by God. When someone asked Stonewall Jackson how he could ride so swiftly and fearlessly into battle, he replied that he was just as safe in battle as he was in his bed, because he knew that he would not die until God intended for him to die. That is the courage a Christian should exhibit.

    The recurring message from our pastor about how to respond to all of this has been to have grace, and I agree with that. Particularly towards one another, we should act with grace. I don't understand some people's fear, but it would be needlessly unkind to berate them for it.

    Romans 13 has been cited by every cowardly Christian who has ever bent over to lick the boots of their oppressor. I have no doubt that Nazi collaborators pointed to that verse in Romans to justify turning in their Jewish neighbors for not wearing a yellow star, just as Kristian Karen will point to it today to justify calling 911 because she saw someone walking their dog without a mask. Disobedience to tyranny is obedience to God. Perhaps I'll muster the energy to perform a deeper analysis of that so-frequently-misused verse.

    The regulation within the church leadership is an interesting one, and it highlights denominational differences. Catholics and Reformed Protestant churches are organized with a hierarchy that extends well beyond the local church. The Presbyterian Church split into two significant groups many years back over the issue of homosexuality. Whichever side someone chose, they submitted to be governed by that larger organization, and many began attending a new local church to reflect their side. Contrast that with the Baptists, who are not reformed (meaning that we are not Protestant; we were never part of the Catholic Church, and so we did not break away from them), who recognize no authority above the local church. There are no "fathers" in a Baptist Church; only "brothers."

    My brother-in-law is a deacon in his Presbyterian church. The vast majority of the local church members want to continue meeting for worship. But the bishops (or whomever) above them have said no. If you choose to be a Presbyterian and submit to that authority, then you are stuck with their mistakes. The decision in a Baptist church will be made by the congregation--not the pastor or the deacons; but the congregation itself. Clearly, I am biased, but I much prefer the Baptist system. It is a democratic vote among the members, but that does not entail the general folly of democracy on a larger scale. These are the people that I have chosen to be my family; not random strangers who are entitled to a vote simply because they showed up. And if the disagreement ran deep enough, the church would simply split into two churches, and I would align myself with the group that chose to continue worship.
    Virtute et Armis

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    8,641
    Quote Originally Posted by LawDog View Post
    In the context of church, it's a difficult call. I'm content with how my own church has handled it. I was in disagreement with the decision to close the doors during the initial lockdown (in April or so) which lasted about six weeks. Everyone seemed to think it would just be a couple of weeks, and then we'd be back to normal. Then it stretched on and eventually reached a breaking point. We reopened the doors, but roped off every other pew and added a third service in order to space people out. At no point did we mandate masks. There are a few older people who choose to wear masks themselves, but there is no expectation that everyone do so. The third service and roped-off pews lasted for two or three weeks, then we abandoned that and just went back to normal. Now the remaining awkwardness is just trying to figure out whether to hug someone, shake their hand, fist bump, or just wave.

    I confess a certain disappointment in many of the older members of our congregation. I was surprised by how many exhibited genuine fear of the Chin Flu. A Christian should emboldened by the knowledge that their time on earth is decided by God. When someone asked Stonewall Jackson how he could ride so swiftly and fearlessly into battle, he replied that he was just as safe in battle as he was in his bed, because he knew that he would not die until God intended for him to die. That is the courage a Christian should exhibit.

    The recurring message from our pastor about how to respond to all of this has been to have grace, and I agree with that. Particularly towards one another, we should act with grace. I don't understand some people's fear, but it would be needlessly unkind to berate them for it.

    Romans 13 has been cited by every cowardly Christian who has ever bent over to lick the boots of their oppressor. I have no doubt that Nazi collaborators pointed to that verse in Romans to justify turning in their Jewish neighbors for not wearing a yellow star, just as Kristian Karen will point to it today to justify calling 911 because she saw someone walking their dog without a mask. Disobedience to tyranny is obedience to God. Perhaps I'll muster the energy to perform a deeper analysis of that so-frequently-misused verse.

    The regulation within the church leadership is an interesting one, and it highlights denominational differences. Catholics and Reformed Protestant churches are organized with a hierarchy that extends well beyond the local church. The Presbyterian Church split into two significant groups many years back over the issue of homosexuality. Whichever side someone chose, they submitted to be governed by that larger organization, and many began attending a new local church to reflect their side. Contrast that with the Baptists, who are not reformed (meaning that we are not Protestant; we were never part of the Catholic Church, and so we did not break away from them), who recognize no authority above the local church. There are no "fathers" in a Baptist Church; only "brothers."

    My brother-in-law is a deacon in his Presbyterian church. The vast majority of the local church members want to continue meeting for worship. But the bishops (or whomever) above them have said no. If you choose to be a Presbyterian and submit to that authority, then you are stuck with their mistakes. The decision in a Baptist church will be made by the congregation--not the pastor or the deacons; but the congregation itself. Clearly, I am biased, but I much prefer the Baptist system. It is a democratic vote among the members, but that does not entail the general folly of democracy on a larger scale. These are the people that I have chosen to be my family; not random strangers who are entitled to a vote simply because they showed up. And if the disagreement ran deep enough, the church would simply split into two churches, and I would align myself with the group that chose to continue worship.
    2 things:
    1. Love the Stonewall Jackson story
    2. Stealing the “Kristian Karen” moniker
    LIVING > FIRED > JAIL > DEAD
    DISCIPLINA EST LIBERTATEM
    KRG, HRO: Team Tactics 1/2, CRG, HRO: CQB/Team Tactics, Defensive Knife, TMCO


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