Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,873

    Default Jo (short staff) Training Sequence

    Here’s a short vid we did showing a training sequence with the short staff (jo). These are the first four movements from one of our jo kata, something I find very useful.

    This movement can be applied to any long arm and is particularly useful for Tac-14 style weapons. It does need some modification; rather than doing the hand change (you’re of course not going to change the striking end of a gun), you strike from right to left first, then left to right. Opposite of what the vid shows.



    We are pumping out vids as fast as we can, trying to supply content to our students given the current bullshit. A lot of the stuff so far may not be of great interest here, but more is coming. Please subscribe to the channel, we could use the exposure. A lot of the material, even the kids stuff, is still useful and fundamental stuff.

    Thanks
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    1,540
    What's the purpose of switching ends of the staff? Does it build up some momentum for a strike?

    Many thanks for the videos - Subscribed.
    Armed Puritan

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    269
    Thanks for sharing. I was actually looking for some video content exactly like this!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,873
    Quote Originally Posted by TFA303 View Post
    What's the purpose of switching ends of the staff? Does it build up some momentum for a strike?
    Great question.

    One of the strengths of sticks (and spears for that matter) is that you have a lot of freedom in where you can hold the weapon. Where you hold it really determines the things you can do with it. A grip that facilitates thrusting at distance (as shown in the video) isn’t as useful for bad breath distance problems...but to take advantage of that we must be able to quickly and securely change our grip while under pressure. So from a training perspective, the grip change is a skill development exercise.

    In terms of specific application, the hand change facilitates attacking from a different angle. We see an opening and attack accordingly; sometimes that is best done by changing our grip. Performing a downward diagonal strike from our right is a lot easier with the right hand leading. Imagine trying to hit a baseball from a right handed stance but with the left hand on top...you could do it but it’s harder, thus the hand change.

    Of course the kata then shows a left diagonal strike with the right hand leading...all I can say is that fighting is more variable than baseball! I need to do another video...
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,873
    This might sound pedantic but it’s not - there’s a difference between changing our grip (what is displayed in the video) and changing the end of the weapon we’re using to strike.

    With stick training it’s useful to differentiate the the tip vs. the butt. You can hit with any part of the stick of course, but people can level up quicker with this understanding.

    Some weapons (spear, gun, sword) clearly have a “business end”. You can butt with a spear and a gun, and you can pommel someone with a sword, but generally we prefer to use the business end. With a rifle/shotgun/PGO, sometimes a butt stroke is called for, but I’d rather muzzle punch if given the choice. Since this kata is based on spear technique, that’s also another reason why a grip change is often performed...it’s keeping the business end on the target.

    Of course stick is just a stick, you can hit with any part of it. What works best is situation dependent...but we still want the ability to change hands depending on what the situation gives us.

    A stick doesn’t have a sharp pointy thing attached sadly, but the cool thing is that you can grip any part of it, and yet any part can also hurt the other guy...it’s all business end! A simple observation maybe but I think that’s significant. Every weapon has strengths, weaknesses and trade offs.

    Incidentally, there is a famed historical European swordsman (I forget his name) that considered the short staff superior to the sword, at least in a dueling context. And supposedly the only person ever to defeat Musashi in a duel was using a jo.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,873
    That was a bit of a tangent. But I think some ability with a longish stick is very practical. Anything “stickish” works the same...brooms, pool cues, shovels, these are all common items.

    Think of an ax or sledge hammer...instead of swinging/chopping like you normally would, imagine using it just as demonstrated in the jo kata. I think you’d find it a lot easier to fight with that way.

    Mostly I posted this to stoke some imagination on how you might use this with a long gun. What is the same, what is different...
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    1,540
    Thank you, sir - I learned a lot from that!
    Armed Puritan

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,873
    Here is more from the Jo kata. The second sequence is a repeat of the first, they are simply joined by a leaping step designed to cover a lot of ground. Again, you can hopefully see how this can be applied to long guns (though not necessarily exactly as demonstrated in the kata.

    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    13
    Cool stuff, thanks for sharing.

    It looks like it has passing similarities to some HEMA techniques (e.g. Talhoffer two-handed sword techniques). I guess that makes sense.

    Adam

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,873
    Quote Originally Posted by Adam_ View Post
    Cool stuff, thanks for sharing.

    It looks like it has passing similarities to some HEMA techniques (e.g. Talhoffer two-handed sword techniques). I guess that makes sense.

    Adam
    Yes. Cool that someone recognizes the similarities.

    I've been looking at a fair amount of HEMA stuff lately. Of course there's a lot of overlap (a stick is a stick and most things you can do with a stick you can also do with a sword), but it's interesting to look at both similarities and differences between weapons and methods/styles of use. As well as the history of weapons and tactics development...everything depends on context.

    But yes, there's a good deal of overlap between the European long sword and the Japanese jo training. Overhand and diagonal strikes are the most obvious (everyone does that stuff). But a little more interesting to me is looking at the half-swording techniques, these look a lot like the thrusts with the jo (both designed to hit small openings in armor). The connection to modern long guns is obvious.

    Capture.jpg
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •