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Thread: Carnivore Diet

  1. #21
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    Breakfast today - Piece of Wild Caught Salmon - defrosted night before and cooked in a pan with coconut oil. Added some plantains and bacon. Washed down with a double espresso with coconut cream.

    Lunch today - 1/2 pound of grass fed hamburger, rest of the plantains, and a serving of organic saurkraut. Iced tea to wash it down.

    Dinner - likely a steak with a salad.
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  2. #22
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    I've been following the carnivore movement for a while. I ignore the fanatics who say nobody should ever eat vegetables, but I find it fascinating because they are questioning a lot of conventional wisdom about what it means to eat "healthy" (e.g. healthy=lots of vegetables). Shawn Baker and Paul Saladino are a couple doctors who have books out now that dig into the science--I plan to read them at some point, but I get the impression from listening to them discuss it that (as I would have expected) there really is a lot less solid evidence for the idea that "more vegetables = better" than most people would think based on what all the "experts" say.

    From reading a lot of anecdotal stories, it seems obvious that going carnivore (or something close to that) is a great way to experiment with personal health. It's the ultimate elimination diet, and it appears to offer a lot of potential for self-healing. My current hypothesis is that it's basically giving your digestive system a break (especially when combined with intermittent fasting), which frees up your body to work on repairing and rejuvenating itself. Digestion is hard work and puts a lot of demands on your body, especially if you force it to deal with stuff that's difficult to digest. It's going to try its best, but it may compromise long-term health during the process (like taking stuff out of your teeth and bones!). Meat is probably the easiest thing to digest, hence why so many people have amazing reactions when they cut out everything else.

    Obviously everybody can conduct their own experiments with adding stuff back in and observing the effects, and I'm sure that there are plenty of vegetables that don't cause problems for many people, but it just makes sense to start with a clean slate instead of trying to work backwards (trying to figure out what's causing the problem before eliminating it).

  3. #23
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    you're missing a couple of key elements. 1). the gut is full of bacteria that is directly in line with what you feed it. If it's used to carbs and sugars then when you change your diet, you will get rid of that bacteria in replacement for what's more in line with your diet which is one of those reasons you will get the squirts when you change significantly. 2) meat may be easier to digest (I haven't seen that data) but protein is harder to process. It requires more water and takes longer to utilize. 3). with any strict diet you need to supplement, there are vitamins you require that aren't found in meat so you need to get those from somewhere.
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  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Nichols View Post
    you're missing a couple of key elements. 1). the gut is full of bacteria that is directly in line with what you feed it. If it's used to carbs and sugars then when you change your diet, you will get rid of that bacteria in replacement for what's more in line with your diet which is one of those reasons you will get the squirts when you change significantly. 2) meat may be easier to digest (I haven't seen that data) but protein is harder to process. It requires more water and takes longer to utilize. 3). with any strict diet you need to supplement, there are vitamins you require that aren't found in meat so you need to get those from somewhere.
    I'm not claiming to be an expert, but I have spent some time listening to those who do. Right now it's more about asking questions and challenging conventional wisdom than claiming hard conclusions. But I think there may be some merit to the argument that what you need (vitamins, minerals, etc.) is not as static as most people think. For example, one of the common reactions to the idea of strict carnivore is "you're going to get scurvy because you aren't getting vitamin C!". But there are people who have been doing it for a long time and never had any issues. There are A LOT of people who have been doing it for 6 months or longer as the movement has taken off with no issues. So then people ask "what if there's more to the story?". The argument I've heard is that the more carbs you eat the more vitamin C you need. But if you don't eat carbs you actually don't need much vitamin C. Supposedly the official guidelines were generated based on the "normal" diet which had plenty of carbs and the science behind what we're told on every food label is actually not very solid.

    We've all been told that sailors used to get scurvy because they weren't eating fresh fruit, but this makes me ask if the real reason sailors used to get scurvy is not so much because they weren't eating fruit as that they were eating a lot of carbs on their long journeys.

    I don't conclude from that that nobody needs to supplement. But I am very intrigued when somebody digs into the details and asks "what's the basis for the standard recommendations about X?" and finds out that it's actually not very solid. Then when there are a bunch of anecdotes that completely defy what conventional wisdom would have predicted, I get more intrigued. I'm always attracted to something that questions conventional orthodoxy.

    To be clear, I'm not an advocate of hard-core carnivore eating, but I am very much an advocate of the science-related exploration and questioning that it is stimulating.

    Here's a taste--Shawn Baker is a doctor (I think he's an orthopedic surgeon) so he understands the way medical research works. He's also a world-champion athlete (I think his focus is rowing, but he does hard-core strength workouts as well). This is a presentation he made last year:



    Here's a playlist of all the presentations from the event:

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...6aesfpGmudTPnR

    The other doctor I've seen who is really digging into the science of all this stuff is Paul Saladino:

    https://carnivoremd.com/

    He has a blog, podcast, lots of interviews on YouTube, and just released his book. He gets into the science details more than Baker does.

  5. #25
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    Lunch- Double western cheeseburger(no fries). Already had two lattes...

    dinner- maybe a porterhouse and green beans, idk yet, still kinda early...
    Nothing says Fuck You like a shotgun.....

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by DogDoc View Post
    The elimination diet I put folks on in those cases are high in meat and real vegetables
    Doc, what kind of veggies would be indicated to start with on an elimination diet? (I'm guessing nightshade veggies are out?)

    How about spices? Good, no good?

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