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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    One way to look at training: our goal is to shorten our OODA loop. We go through the loop regardless, I don't think you can short circuit or avoid the loop but you CAN go through the steps very, very quickly. Kata teaches this (I think kata is genius because the practical application of the OODA loop has been embedded in kata for hundreds of years) by training us to move and react mindlessly...and of course the flip side which is resetting the other guy back to the start of his own loop.

    For the purpose of dealing with personal violence, OODA reaction must happen at the speed of feeling. Thinking is too slow.


    I've been teaching OODA for more years than I can count. I haven't found it too difficult to impart. And when I really want to simplify things, I share a principle that is in line with OODA - If in doubt, just hit the bastard.

    Excellent post. I concur on the teaching of OODA. Most open minded, educated, first world people get it right away. Attempting to make it a physical thing misses the point. I will say again...OODA is a mental process and not a physical one. The physical aspects are controlled by the mind, but the body must not have a lag time...it must be as SI Staffer commented after a gunfight...mindless. You don't get mindless by making brass on the range. You get mindless with continual repetitive contextual training.

    One of the biggest impediments to learning I have seen in the last five years is the desire for newness among students. It is as if the idea was not coined last week it has no value. The thinking is that little that was invented prior to their own birth...or their joining the police or military...of before the War on Terror is somehow invalid. (Shades of the Millenial K-9 snowflake in the shoothouse for those who were there).

    It is impossible to teach anything that requires analytical thinking outside of their narrow faith to a growing number of the population. They want their thinking done for them. Nothing we can do for those people except note the direction of the bullets that took them then adjust our maneuver accordingly.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  2. #22
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    From August 2019

    GETTING TO THE SHOT II

    In the first installment we discussed the difficulty many people have about shooting what is evidently an active shooter. In short there is the seemingly societal aversion to and violence and the associated fear of “getting trouble”. We will discuss that one next time. There is also the difficulty in processing the incoming flood of sounds, images, and words and extrapolating actionable information from it to arrive at a decision to act. This is no small matter as there will always be a degree of uncertainty. Some call this traversing the OODA loop.

    For those who came in late, OODA refers to the process by which humans process information. It was coined by an Air Force fighter pilot named Colonel John Boyd (not a bearded Youtube gun guy as some may have been told). OODA refers to observation vis-ŕ-vis all the senses, orienting what has been sensed through the filters of your prior training and experience, arriving at a decision, and then acting upon that decision.


    A secret…the more you know about the event at hand, the faster you will process meaningful information from the incoming flood.


    The most important gaps to traverse in the OODA cycle are the stretches between Observation and Orientation. This is done with knowledge. I make a point to tell my students that everything they read about terrorism, they should print out and keep. Every post on your forum that is informational on active shooters or terrorists should be visited (the system will time-stamp when you read the thread) and printed out for future reference. Not only will knowledge of their tactics help you in filtering the raw data you are receiving, but help you arrive at a valid course of action.


    An easy example – a military aged middle eastern male with a back pack yelling Alahu Akhbar in 1999 would have received little attention. But based on what we know today in 2019, the response of those around him would be vastly different. It is not enough to have casual knowledge.


    Your knowledge must be deep and vetted and you must be able to articulate to others what you saw and why it has led you to your actions. Not that we are overly concerned about the aftermath at this point. But training the mind to do this also trains the mind to process and understand this information better.


    The second gap involves the stretch from D to A…or decision to action. There seems to be an innate second guess system built in that slows most people down. At a certain level, this is a good thing as it prevents over reaction. However, it is not that “second guess” that seems to retard the speed of our act. Rather it is the timing of the Decision, the selection of the correct action, and then the execution of that action.


    Imagine this situation. A good guy sees the active shooter. He notices how he looks, his positioning in relation to everything else around him. The observation is inevitably tied to profiling. We almost do both simultaneously. Our good guy profiles him as a bad guy based on his appearance, demeanor, location, and all the other factors that are incoming as information.


    These two phases of observation and orientation (perhaps more correctly observation and categorization) happen immediately. But there is an open ended time frame after the categorization happens that depends on the perceptions of the actions of the bad guy. We could easily say, “Look…there is a bad guy. I have observed him and have arrived at the opinion that he is a bad guy”.


    But that is not actionable. What is he doing that requires any action from us? Or just as important…what do we perceive he is doing, or about to do?


    A bad guy standing there minding his own business is not anything we need to act upon. The infinite possibilities of his actions, or lack of, are impossible to predict. The bad guy may walk away, he may sing a song, he may produce a rifle from his bag, he may light up a joint, or he may nothing. Attempting to predict those actions and then have a prepared response to each and every outcome is impossible.


    But there is in fact something we can do…we can simplify.


    There are only a handful of potential actions the bad guy may undertake that have any bearing on us. And in identifying those important and significant actions, and their implications to our overall mission, gives us quite a head start. What do we care about? Let’s boil it down to two possible situations.


    The bad guy produces a weapon, or the bad guy points a weapon at us or someone else. Anything else he may do is not important. Your potential responses should be simplified as well.


    Setting “triggers” is a very simple way to get from one frame of mind to the other.



    For example, a default response to the bad guy approaching you could be your hand coming up, palm out, and you announcing, “I can’t help you”, as you continue moving and scanning for accomplices. That simple response is easy to remember and apply once a contact has been categorized as a potential bad guy. That same bad guy producing a weapon (or attempting to do so) would be set up as the mental trigger that moves you from an avoidance "defense-based" footing to an aggressive "counter attack-based" footing. This would trigger your default response…a draw and move off the X and counter-attack.


    Having multiple options as solutions to a presented problem is a recipe for disaster. Having one default response to a given stimulus will allow you to respond quickly and efficiently once the situation is recognized. But training that default must be done correctly and with some circumspection. When you see the profiled bad guy produce the rifle from the bag, or raise it to point, you need to have a response that you can bring to the fight without any conscious analytical thought. It must be a conditioned, habituated, and mindless response.


    We want our responses automatic and not requiring of analytical thought. This leaves our minds available to determine if there is a need for shooting and who should be getting shot, not in how to arrive at that point physically.


    The way to have that level of skill is to develop a handful of habitual actions given the stimulus of the fight…or pending fight. One draw, not twelve. One way to move off the line of fire, not twelve. One way to manipulate the weapon, not six or seven. When I see a system teaching several types of draws and multiple ways to move off the X, along with multiple methods to operate the weapon, I shrug and categorize that as an over complicated method that has never been tested in a real fight.


    If you want to turn decision into action faster and more certain, simplify exactly what those questions are, as well as their answers. And then have as much command of language as you do with fighting so you can articulate what happened later. The pen is not mightier than the sword...they are both things in need of mastery.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    The physical aspects are controlled by the mind, but the body must not have a lag time...
    THIS.

    OODA is processing time in the mind. info comes in, is processed, a response is generated and then put into action - all in milliseconds. The more experience you have, the faster the processing time. The more you have trained...trained in the right context and in ways that condition appropriate responses...the less lag time there is between the decision in the mind being translated to action in the body.


    One of the reasons I prefer in-fighting...feeling is much faster than seeing. If you can speak that language then your response is virtually instant. Students in the 0-5 and PGF classes get a good taste of that.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    Excellent post. I concur on the teaching of OODA. Most open minded, educated, first world people get it right away. Attempting to make it a physical thing misses the point. I will say again...OODA is a mental process and not a physical one. The physical aspects are controlled by the mind, but the body must not have a lag time...it must be as SI Staffer commented after a gunfight...mindless. You don't get mindless by making brass on the range. You get mindless with continual repetitive contextual training.

    One of the biggest impediments to learning I have seen in the last five years is the desire for newness among students. It is as if the idea was not coined last week it has no value. The thinking is that little that was invented prior to their own birth...or their joining the police or military...of before the War on Terror is somehow invalid. (Shades of the Millenial K-9 snowflake in the shoothouse for those who were there).

    It is impossible to teach anything that requires analytical thinking outside of their narrow faith to a growing number of the population. They want their thinking done for them. Nothing we can do for those people except note the direction of the bullets that took them then adjust our maneuver accordingly.
    Well said!

    Referencing your last paragraph above, would you agree that part of the lack of analytical thinking capacity is the result of being taught linear thinking in schools and by society? I ask this because I've seen shooters (and others) fail to "problem solve", because they couldn't resort to a "group think", flowchart, or "connect the dots; 1,2,3..." solution.

  5. #25
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    Some situations call for a decision tree, others call for a decision stick.

    Unless you have a lot of forewarning, violence happens at speed. Choose wisely.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  6. #26
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    Great stuff gentlemen.

    Thanks for your time and insight.
    Be alert, stand firm in the faith, act like a man, be strong. Your every action must be done with love.

    “Adversity introduces a man to himself.”

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    Some situations call for a decision tree, others call for a decision stick.

    Unless you have a lot of forewarning, violence happens at speed. Choose wisely.
    ^^YES
    OODA cycle learning curve is like Groundhog Day. Developing, through repetition, our ability to identify intention indicators and link them to an appropriate action decision at an advantageous time in an event. We have to progress from "what's he doing and what does it mean?" to knowing what's about to happen. When we know what happens before what happens happens, we can better avoid, de-escalate, or cause things to happen. We have more mental time to better control the tempo of the event and keep our opponent reacting to what we caused. This is the objective of tactics.

    I will add that we accomplish this through ongoing contextual observation, awareness and experience with quality de-briefs, and quality Force on Force.
    Last edited by Dave Sauer; 02-17-2020 at 06:15 PM.
    Dave Sauer
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    "The path which leads to truth is littered with the bodies of the ignorant." --Musashi

    Onward & Upward!

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Yamamoto View Post
    THIS.

    OODA is processing time in the mind. info comes in, is processed, a response is generated and then put into action - all in milliseconds. The more experience you have, the faster the processing time. The more you have trained...trained in the right context and in ways that condition appropriate responses...the less lag time there is between the decision in the mind being translated to action in the body.


    One of the reasons I prefer in-fighting...feeling is much faster than seeing. If you can speak that language then your response is virtually instant. Students in the 0-5 and PGF classes get a good taste of that.
    This right here. We used to call it Default Aggression, initial response is always aggressive action because it's easier and faster to back down from aggressive action than it is to move from passive to aggressive. It's more efficient. It's also know as Trained Response, or Flinch Response

    Training and practice, as said above, does speed up the OODA process because it makes your noise to signal filter finer and more efficient at processing the information you need.

    We used to have a saying, "I'm a prisoner of my body until the gunshot sets me free". In other words, hostile action releases my body to action and frees my mind to begin processing other information of tactical importance as it presents itself.

    As an example, the other day me and a buddy were walking out of the office and there was a really loud BANG!, I hunched, began my draw stroke, and got off line as I spun to address the source of the sound (gun didn't leave the holster). As I made it past the first to O's I decided that it was someone folding one of those big hydraulic lift gates in half that caused the sound so I didn't need to Act beyond my initial Default Aggression other than to recover my gun. My buddy was still standing in the same spot looking at me and other than my movement didn't see a thing, and still had both hands occupied with gym bag and laptop.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
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    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

  9. #29
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    Well...my staff is "all the way live" today. This is great and I fear the majority of people will simply ignore it because it is not fat wrapped in spandex and promising to cut split times.

    Notables -

    1). The more experience you have, the faster the processing time. The more you have trained...trained in the right context and in ways that condition appropriate responses...the less lag time there is between the decision in the mind being translated to action in the body.

    Very true - and THAT RIGHT THERE kids is why training the Kata and contextual dry fire is so much more important and skill developing than going to the range and shooting.

    2). Training and practice, as said above, does speed up the OODA process because it makes your noise to signal filter finer and more efficient at processing the information you need.

    We used to have a saying, "I'm a prisoner of my body until the gunshot sets me free". In other words, hostile action releases my body to action and frees my mind to begin processing other information of tactical importance as it presents itself.


    Indeed. Default Aggression. I am predisposed to shoot the bad guy in the face, not argue, not get emotional, nor posture, nor negotiate. But we need the signal that sets the tiger loose from the cage he lives in daily (to get along with those who are not tigers). When the bad guys offer violence, common humans shrink and hide, but we smile...even laugh...because they by their actions have set us free.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    When the bad guys offer violence, common humans shrink and hide, but we smile...even laugh...because they by their actions have set us free.[/COLOR][/BOLD]
    Been on hot calls where I couldn't keep from smiling. My partners thought I was nuts.

    Why do this work if you're ruled by fear and indecision?
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I ride the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer

    "What cannot be remedied must be endured."

    180. And a wakeup.

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