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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    9,896
    If you want to train just stick to ground work with someone who knows your injuries and roll for exercise.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Ft. Riley, KS
    Posts
    1,078
    Slow down... Roll at 70-80% and make sure your partners are aware of any injuries. You'll still progress but you'll save your body a lot of wear & tear.


    "If you find yourself in a fair fight you failed to properly prepare..."

    "History is the autobiography of a madman..."

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    697
    If you love it keep training. If you weigh the injuries vs. What you get out training(fitness, fellowship, fighting ability etc.) And the injuries are more then you can deal with then stop and dont look back.
    Im 50 and still train. But i know my days are numbered and when the injuries hurt more then i love to grapple, i'll pack it in. Right now my training week is usually 2 days of drilling w/ no or very little rolling(just the technique portion of class), 1 or 2 days of drilling followed by about 20 or 30 minutes rolling from the knees(a regular bjj class) and 1 day of 15 minutes drilling takedowns and 45 minutes rolling from the feet. So 3 days max live sparring with only 1 of those being really hard. Thats about all i can handle at this point. All nogi.

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  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    8,508
    I think you should still roll, but change up your approach and strategy. Maybe that means a different school that is less about competition.

    Signed, one who rolls over 40.
    LIVING > FIRED > JAIL > DEAD

    DISCIPLINA EST LIBERTATEM
    KRG, HRO: Team Tactics 1/2, CRG, HRO: CQB/Team Tactics, Defensive Knife, TMCO


    T
    WOTU Since 2012


  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    South Mississippi
    Posts
    8
    I couldn’t give it up yet. I’m pushing 43 and I love putting in mat time. At 5’4” and 135 lbs I’m always the littlest guy on the mat and usually a target for new guys with something to prove so I stay away from them. With that much time in I’m sure you’re an asset to he gym and I’d hate to see you go if you were one of my training partners. Best of luck.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    9,896
    Quote Originally Posted by WinstonSmith View Post
    I think you should still roll, but change up your approach and strategy. Maybe that means a different school that is less about competition.

    Signed, one who rolls over 40.
    Exactly, when I was rolling a lot (including with multiple Midwest UFC guys), everyone was aware of all my injuries and when they heard me make the sound that indicated something hurt me they'd immediately stop in place until I indicated I was OK and then we'd continue working ground work. The only exception was a dude visiting on an open mat day who wasn't that good and was scrambling to beat me, the only reason I tapped was because he was about to injure me with an improperly applied submission, after he kept it on well after I had tapped. I decided that I was going to hurt him in the next 3 minutes and I did, he never came back.
    Last edited by Greg Nichols; 01-21-2020 at 08:55 AM.
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    218
    At 56 I find myself dealing with this issue. And appreciating the collective knowledge here. Thanks guys. Great thread
    Last edited by krav51; 01-21-2020 at 09:10 AM.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Not of this world
    Posts
    17,714
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    I fought full contact Kyokushin. Then I fought full contact on the street as an LE. My record on the street was undefeated...not bullshitting. Can't say the same in Kyokushin. But at nearly 60 years old, I have no desire to get in a street fight. I have no doubt that I can beat a man a third of my age to death, but then again...

    I still train, and have no doubt that I can break bones...but full contact stuff...not for me any more. I have posted an image of me shirtless within the last few months. I am not letting the old man in. But just as deadlift maxes give way to more hypertrophy work, so do full contact fights give way to more bag work and kata. Anyone that thinks I am a pussy and wants to test me had best make peace with whatsoever they believe in, because they will die quickly in the attempt.

    I have the skills that I can move and maneuver out of a fist fight or a ground fight, just enough to sodomize my attacker with a threaded barrel and a few 9mm enemas. I have no intent to ever lose...or to get hurt trying to keep a 25 year old edge. Just saying. Hell Royce Gracie himself carries a Suarez RMR G19...maybe he has made the same realizations?

    If BJJ is injuring you, then BJJ should become a thing of your history...not a thing you are a slave to.
    This.

    Gabe and I are a few months apart in age, and I also spent a lifetime doing traditional MA's, then to Krav Maga and Combatives. Many years as an LEO/SWAT, etc. with a ton of injuries. My predominant injury has been low back (L4-L5-S1) disc/arthritis/bone spurs that I constantly train around. I still work out hard and look and am much stronger than ~90+% of those in their 20's. For me at this point, it's all about healthspan/lifespan as Dr. Peter Attia calls it. I do a lot of solo training in combatives/stick/knife/gun, and also train on a regular basis with one of Michael Janich's top instructors in Atlanta. All that to say my goals are different than they were 20 years ago, and staying healthy, fit, strong, and dangerous until my last breath is the goal.

    As far as training BJJ, the above reasons are why I haven't done it at my age. Sure, I train ground stuff with what I do, but the competition days are long behind me. Focus on the goal of maintaining fitness, health, and being dangerous until the end and give up competitive BJJ. If you can train safely with a couple of close buddies who you know will not cause you further injury, then do that.
    **Mike Ronin on FaceBook**

    **Spero optimus instruo pro pessimus**

    **Out of destruction rises opportunity. We are only defeated when we give up. Never, ever give up. (Phil 4:13)**

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,788
    I know I'm biased, but this whole thread is an argument for taking the Pistol Ground Fighting course.

    There are reasons the course was designed the way it was.

    Consider the 4 gun safety rules, which are valid and practical both in training as well as in the real world. My approach to fighting is much the same...it must be valid, practical and safe in training, while developing skills and conditioning the right responses for real violence.

    Every training drill and method has strengths, but also has weaknesses (concessions to safety). We mitigate that by doing different drills with different strengths so that all weaknesses can be addressed in an overall training methodology.

    If you're a high level jujutsu competitor, from a competition perspective it doesn't matter that you're broken by your mid 40s (or 20s for that matter). Competition chews you up and spits you out and cares nothing for you after you've left the game.

    For those of us who want a good LIFE, we have a different goal. After all that's why we train martial skills, right? In order to preserve life...ours and those we love. What's the point of training if the method breaks your body and leaves you not only incapable of protecting your family, but also leaves you in pain and disability for the rest of your life? Life is good, but it's a lot better when you can enjoy it.

    I intend to be living an awesome life well into my 80s. Enjoying jujutsu not only on the mat but in other more enjoyable places (use your imagination), and just enjoying the hell out of life whatever I do.

    So...choices. Make good ones.

    Capture.JPG

    Anyway...come to Pistol Ground Fighting. Learn how to save your life...and just as important how to train for this stuff so that you can enjoy your life.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Close Range Gunfighting 3, Oregon - pending
    Pistol Groundfighting, Kansas
    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

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