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  1. #1
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    Default DEFINING ACCURACY

    While working on a 2020 project it became clear (er) to me that the largest roadblock to students learning is the inability of modern instructors to express and articulate what they mean.

    They may know, physically speaking, what they want to convey, but simply "showing it" won't get the message across. There is of course the modern phenomena of the mentally lazy student that doesn't want to hear any verbal explanations and is there solely for massive ballistic masturbation disguised as training, and that leads the review-focused instructor to provide what he perceives they are there for. There is also the factor of the growing culture of selective-illiteracy. Quite simply, those who do not read will not have the same command of language as those who do, and so non-readers will not have the tools of expression that readers would.

    The project involves a video I have planned for the early Spring of 2020 where I will put forth all we know about Red Dot Pistols, including historical photographs, emails, as well as the best ways to run these at the high levels you see us run. Likely a three video package available in the same way the Kata Video has been. The storyboard involved the difference between physical alignment and what the eyes do with the sights. That is where most guys lose track of the flow of events. So here is the best set of description, terminology, and definitions.

    We begin with kinesthetic alignment. The term "Kinesthetic" relates to a person's awareness of the position and movement of the parts of the body by means of sensory organs (proprioceptors) in the muscles and joints. One might say - "Kinesthetic learning through a physical activity". It is why we train Kata in the first place, and why dry practice is essential to the development of a gunfighter. Kinesthetic is a physical thing and has nothing at all to do with the eyes nor where the vision is focused. Kinesthetic alignment of a pistol is a physical matter, and handled in the same way that one draws the weapon and points it in the direction of a target - two handed and at shoulder height...in line with the eyes and the target.

    For a close distance large size target, that is enough and no additional concerns are needed. But we want to develop a mindless flow of refinement from the physical only, to the perfect, firing as needed along the way. So there is no break or disconnect between Physical Alignment and Visual Refinement. One is a part of the other and inseparable. That flow begins with the deployment of the pistol out and toward the target, arriving at an increasing degree of kinesthetic alignment, pointed directly at the desired target.

    But we don't stop there. We continue developing the precise alignment via Visual Refinement of the existing Physical Alignment. We do so by indexing the sighting system, whether it is a set of iron sights, or a red dot, onto the desired impact point. That refinement begins with both eyes open and focused on the target, and builds greater refinement via the the visual flows from target focus to sight focus, and then from both eyes in use to the master eye in use to visually refine the visual index on the target.

    The key issue is learning what is enough alignment and what is enough refinement.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  2. #2
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    There are so many nuances that go into getting the physical part of that kinesthetic alignment right consistently. Starting with a natural and relaxed stance, hips open, with the proper balance of relaxation and isolation of tension through the upper torso, shoulders, and arms. The more mentally relaxed you are the better. Tension severely limits our ability to be aware as well as our ability to really see and actually process what we are seeing in the moment. Once you experience that kinesthetic awareness then refinement can truly begin in earnest.
    Paul

    Those who beat their swords into plowshares will plow for those who do not.

  3. #3
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    Gabe said,
    "The key issue is learning what is enough alignment and what is enough refinement."

    In a way, this has me asking IF previously there has been too much focus on pin-point accuracy. I'm wondering if the rhetoric and training dished out since, say the late 1980s by major shooting schools, the gun press, etc. has shooters so busy focusing on their sights, possibly visually complicated (busy) sights, and thus slowing the shot that it has become a problem. With that, the thought that simplified sights, i.e. red dots and "express style" iron sights, resulting in less sight focus (leading to less "refinement") is an obvious solution to getting rounds downrange and on target faster.
    Last edited by P.D.; 12-29-2019 at 02:54 PM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by paranoid View Post
    There are so many nuances that go into getting the physical part of that kinesthetic alignment right consistently. Starting with a natural and relaxed stance, hips open, with the proper balance of relaxation and isolation of tension through the upper torso, shoulders, and arms. The more mentally relaxed you are the better. Tension severely limits our ability to be aware as well as our ability to really see and actually process what we are seeing in the moment. Once you experience that kinesthetic awareness then refinement can truly begin in earnest.
    Personally, I believe your -- or anyone's -- emphasis of stance ("… so many nuances that go into getting the physical part of that kinesthetic alignment …") is wrong. Otherwise, dynamic movement and shooting would not produce hits. Wheelchair shooters and others who do not stand well without support or assistance would be making the shots they do.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by P.D. View Post
    Personally, I believe your -- or anyone's -- emphasis of stance ("… so many nuances that go into getting the physical part of that kinesthetic alignment …") is wrong. Otherwise, dynamic movement and shooting would not produce hits. Wheelchair shooters and others who do not stand well without support or assistance would be making the shots they do.
    Let’s explore this.

    There is always a balance and accuracy. When more speed is needed, accuracy is going to suffer. This is the realm of dynamic movement, point shooting, etc. When more accuracy is needed, there is greater need for refinement of marksmanship.

    There are several fundamentals of marksmanship...but the one we are focusing on here is position. Position is more than stance (though stance is part of it). It includes balance, the appropriate mix of relaxation and tension, the alignment of joints (which of course varies based on how we are shooting - standing, kneeling, behind cover, etc.). Position can be refined just as a trigger press can be.

    We all have disabilities to one extent or another. Eyesight can impact your sight alignment and sight picture for instance. Tendonitis can impact your grip, ability to position the arm correctly, and even the trigger press. I have trained with lots of guys who’s position is awkward in some way...nonetheless through practice they have been able to make good hits. Some disabilities are physical, and some bad shooting habits are just that...habits.

    Disabilities must be worked around, whereas habits can be fixed. A guy in a wheelchair can only do so much about the position of his spine, but he certainly has other joints that come into play and can be refined.

    Looking at the different fundamentals of marksmanship (grip, position, sight alignment, sight picture, breathing, trigger press, and follow through), almost all of us have room for improvement in each area...with some areas needing more attention than others.

    The discussion on kinesthetics is most relevant to position. That applies equally to shooting from static (where marksmanship is the highest priority) as it does to dynamic movement (where getting off the X is the highest priority...but hits are still necessary). In both cases, the better your position (meaning the more balanced, graceful, relaxed, aligned, etc.) the more likely you are to hit.

    All the fundamentals are important but some are more important than others, depending on what the situation calls for. I would say under dynamic movement, position (in this case the alignment of the body for movement as well as correct pointing at the target) is more important than anything else.

    From my perspective, what I see in classes, correct position, which includes joint/body alignment and movement, is perhaps the single biggest thing most gun people need to work on. A lot of guys, even capable, experienced shooters, have awkward position and movement. Just because they can make hits doesn’t mean there is no room for improvement.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Close Range Gunfighting 3, Oregon - pending
    Pistol Groundfighting, Kansas
    Pistol Groundfighting, Texas

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by P.D. View Post
    Personally, I believe your -- or anyone's -- emphasis of stance ("… so many nuances that go into getting the physical part of that kinesthetic alignment …") is wrong. Otherwise, dynamic movement and shooting would not produce hits. Wheelchair shooters and others who do not stand well without support or assistance would be making the shots they do.
    The nuances are mostly related to relaxation and isolation of tension in any shooting position, combined with passive strength and balance that allows the body to absorb the recoil to keep the muzzle (pistol or rifle) flat for faster follow up shots. Keeping the muzzle from flipping upward is only part of what allows you to shoot faster, the other part that is more critical to shooting faster with accuracy is seeing faster.
    Paul

    Those who beat their swords into plowshares will plow for those who do not.

  7. #7
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    Kinesthetic alignment is LEARNED stationary, with a learned positioning of the pistol physically, onto the target in a uniform and repeatable manner.

    But once LEARNED, it can be expressed outside of that realm as we do, in movement, dynamic and explosive. But if there is no PRESSING NEED to move dynamically, accuracy is best attained in a default physical position that supports the mission. Thus one moves because he has to, not because he wants to.

    Not every gunfight has uneven initiative, and not every gunfight is a self defense shooting where one is initially targeted by the bad guy.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  8. #8
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    Gabe
    you are light years ahead of most instructors.....they are not even close. This is a great thread, lots of knowledge here. I salute you

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ranger5 View Post
    Gabe
    you are light years ahead of most instructors.....they are not even close. This is a great thread, lots of knowledge here. I salute you

    Thank you sir. Coming from you...high praise indeed.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  10. #10
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    https://twitter.com/DC_Draino/status...314009601?s=20
    Here's a good shoot. Notice the position/stance
    Last edited by paranoid; 12-29-2019 at 05:58 PM.
    Paul

    Those who beat their swords into plowshares will plow for those who do not.

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