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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Spade View Post
    Joshua Chamberlain. His bayonet charge at Gettysburg saved an army. Less known is his salute to the surrendering Army of Virginia at Appomattox. He personifies the mix of education, expressiveness, valor and skill at arms that we praise on these boards. His service became a central case study in the old Army FM on leadership.
    General Ireland (who was from Scotland) and the 137th New York did the same thing at Culp's Hill but Chamberlain was a better writer.
    Last edited by Vlad the Impaler; 10-17-2019 at 02:13 PM. Reason: addition

  2. #12
    Subutai, who was just as good if not better than Genghis Khan, ranks right up there. Gaiseric, the Vandal king who took them from a regional power to ruling the Mediterranean. Dude was a boss. Julius Caesar was brilliant as a military leader. I will also second Hannibal. If he had support from his government, ancient Roman history would be much shorter.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Used to be E.TX but now Kingman AZ, and now back in Texas
    Posts
    1,649

    Default What warrior do you admire the most of all time?

    Gabe Suarez.. I am surprised no one mentioned him yet.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Last edited by paknheat; 10-17-2019 at 02:45 PM.
    Hey.. Why not join the Army? It's free!!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    29
    William Wallace , maybe Gen. Polanski , Call. Davis also of Revolutionary War fame.
    Alexander -they didn’t call him the mediocre or the pretty good and let’s not forget Martel The Hammer!
    Also I’d like to mention Lt.CO. Regner our commanding officer in the best part of my time in the Corps, he is now the head of small unit tactics at the NATO war college. His name may not be well known but a better fighting man or leader I’ve never met.
    Also would like to mention my squad leader and best friend and Brother- we will just call him OX- his call sign- big and strong and stubborn like an Ox and I’ve seen him do things in far away places that make the movies seem tame and believable! About half the Platoon had him hold “The letter” you know the one- cause everyone was sure he’d always make it- he’s one of the ones who walked off with out a scratch when a CH-53 collided with the stack of a ship, he’s the guy I’d call to bring the shovel and lime. Understood fighting and violence and gave everything to warriors under him- brought back your truly with cpr after a Corpsman told him it was time to quit . Saw him save someone from hypothermia with his own body heat; - I could go on and on . The last two aren’t famous and didn’t want to be just are great warriors and men like that are necessary to make great armies and famous Generals!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    OKC
    Posts
    386
    King David.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Scottsdale, AZ
    Posts
    138
    I second Subutai. I find it fascinating how modern his tactics were and he could go up against overwhelming odds and not just survive, but win. This is a little taste of what is written about him on Wikipedia.

    “He was the primary military strategist of
    Genghis Khan and Ögedei Khan. He directed more than 20 campaigns in which he conquered 32 nations and won 65 pitched battles, during which he conquered or overran more territory than any other commander in history. Subutai was a major innovator in the art of war, and his later campaigns demonstrated an unprecedented level of complexity and strategy not seen again until World War II. In the invasions of China, Russia, and Europe, Subutai routinely coordinated armies of ~100,000 men across frontages separated by 500-1,000 km and between 3 and 5 separate army groups. Subutai's armies fought unlike any force in history until the Germans and Russians in World War II, seven hundred years later. They did not operate as one distinct mass, but instead moved along 3–5 axes of approach, often 500–1000 km apart, and threatened numerous objectives simultaneously. Like Napoleon, Subutai (and Genghis Khan) would disperse their forces along a wide frontage and rapidly coalesce at decisive points to defeat the enemy in detail. However, unlike Napoleon, the Mongols retained the flexibility to dispatch armies to the widely separate fronts, through inhospitable terrain or during the most unexpected times of year, often using some armies purely as means of fixing enemy attention and fomenting division in their enemies greater than any other army in history. Their methods were aligned to completely crush the enemy state's will to fight, not merely to defeat their armies and hope they surrendered, as Napoleon had. Subutai has been credited as the first general to operate campaigns using the modern organizational methods of command and control.[63]
    Though unknown to the west for many centuries, Subutai's exploits were first featured by the British military theorist B. H. Liddell Hart in his book Great Captains Unveiled after World War I. Liddell Hart used the example of the Mongols under Genghis and Subutai to demonstrate how a new mechanized army could ideally fight using the principles of mobility, dispersion, surprise, and indirect means. Though he gained little support in Britain, Liddell Hart's books were read in Germany, whose armies during the initial 1940–41 invasions of France and Russia bore an astonishing similarity to the campaigns of Subutai, 700 years earlier. In particular,
    Erwin Rommel and George Patton were avid students of Mongol campaigns.
    Last edited by CaptShack; 10-18-2019 at 11:39 AM. Reason: more information
    Don M.
    Scottsdale, AZ

    "Man's flight through life is sustained by the power of his knowledge"

    Austin 'Dusty' Miller, the quote on the Eagle & Fledgling statue at the U.S. Air Force Academy

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    397
    The Comanche nation
    anonymity is underrated

    Unfair. Unbalanced. Unmedicated.

    Newton's Third Law is a motherfucker.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Dallas TX
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by paknheat View Post
    Gabe Suarez.. I am surprised no one mentioned him yet.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    True, I would be a completely different person now if I hadn't read Gabe's blog posts about predator mindset and how ancient warriors didn't suffer "killer's remorse". I don't have to apologize for being a real man or deciding to intervene if I need to defend innocents. Now I talk to people in the gun community and they're already talking themselves into being cowards before they get into a fight lol.

    I'm a beginner but at least I know the right road now!

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    498
    The person that immediately springs to mind when I think Warrior in my part of the world is Zhaka Zulu.

    Not only because of the Short Stabbing Spear that he designed or his famous Horn of the Bull Formation-A number of regiments forming the chest/center while on each side a regiment formed the horns. The horns would curve inwards around the enemy while the main body advanced, killing all those not able to break the line-But because he established a Warrior culture not unlike the Vikings/Samurai; the man spending their time either training/on campaign.

    And although my ancestors the Voortrekkers were very effective guerilla fighters taking advantage of the skills learned from hunting and living of the land the never embraced fighting as a full time occupation, returning to farming when hostilities seized. Never establishing fighting in the Afrikaner dna.

    Whereas the Zulu nation is synonymous with combat; the mere uttering of the word conjuring up images and expectation fierce fighting. Like the MMA Fighter Nkazimulo Zulu aptly named Zulu Boy.

    OSSU!
    Elfie
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    7,823
    Quote Originally Posted by Catfishman View Post
    True, I would be a completely different person now if I hadn't read Gabe's blog posts about predator mindset and how ancient warriors didn't suffer "killer's remorse". I don't have to apologize for being a real man or deciding to intervene if I need to defend innocents. Now I talk to people in the gun community and they're already talking themselves into being cowards before they get into a fight lol.

    I'm a beginner but at least I know the right road now!
    Lol, That’s your first mistake, talking to people in the gun community....
    Nothing says Fuck You like a shotgun.....

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