Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Melbourne, Florida
    Posts
    688
    Quote Originally Posted by wheel View Post
    ... Sometimes a technique just makes sense immediately. I saw a Stick Technique online that the person called The Spear-You change your hand position on the stick varying the reach of the weapon.

    I realized immediately that if I change my hand position on my Blade during the fight, gripping the Knive at the edge of the handle when the attacker moves in close I can suddenly increase the reach of the weapon and if he is out of reach, gripping the knive near the blade I can make my reach seem a lot shorter. Not allowing him to settle on a comfortable Range where he is safely out of reach.

    I used it the next time I got to train with a partner and it worked immediately, without my needing to work on improving my technique. ...
    OSSU!
    Elfie
    I would submit that if you hadn't practiced other techniques numerous times, you would not be able to do this.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    474
    Hoezit! Mushinto

    Sorry for the late reply. I had a bunch of visitors last week that interrupted my writing.

    You are correct in your assumption. The Spear Technique was not the first Stick technique I taught myself. Starting first with the Heaven Six Drill and Heaven and Earth Drill-If I remember the name correctly-and Single Stick & Knive Drills.

    As well as having my Karate Training as my Base Style.

    Cheers
    Elfie
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Southern Oregon
    Posts
    15
    The topic of training/practice and specifically what it takes to attain a skill is of particular importance for those who consider themselves a student of the warrior arts. The argument of how many properly performed repetitions it takes to move a skill from the level of conscious competence into muscle memory and to the level of unconscious competence is sort of like trying to argue how many angels can fit on the head of a pin.

    Everyone agrees that the more you practice a particular skill, the better you get at it; no one really argues that. Everyone also agrees that some people pickup skills faster than others do. Some of those differences are due to how the information is being presented, the primary learning style of the receiver of the information, the receiver’s past experiences and training, etcetera. So, I think it is fair to say that, for any particular person, the number of repetitions that need to be perfectly performed to acquire a new skill is more than one, but less than a million. This leads me to the question, “Is there a way to reduce the necessary number of perfectly physically performed iterations in order to acquire a new skill?” For that I look at sports psychology and how trainers help their athletes perform better.

    One of the techniques that can be used is mental imagery. Basically, creating a movie in your mind of you performing the skill over and over again. The key to using this mental imagery is to make the movie as perfect as possible. Not only the physical movements but all the sensory inputs that go along with that skill. What you feel while doing it, what you see while doing it, what you hear while doing it, what you smell while doing it, what you taste while doing it. The more “real” you make the imagery the more effective the imagery will be.

    An important part of that mental imagery is to include the achievement of the goal. If the skill you are working on is drawing while busting off the X and getting to the shot, then you must include the bullet impacting the target perfectly along with all the other components of the draw and exploding off the line.

    A key to remember is that mental imagery is in no way a replacement for doing the drills but is an ancillary training method that has been shown to improve performance over physical application of a skill alone.
    I typically do this at night when I first go to bed. I spend at least 5 minutes seeing the movie in my head of me performing the skill I want to work on in an imagined real-life scenario. I make the movie in my head as vivid and as real as I can. In five minutes, I can go through any particular drill hundreds of times. The more you do the drill the faster you get at going through it, so five minutes can get you a tremendous amount of mental practice.

    Another add-on I like to include with this mental training is incorporation of the desired effect while physically doing the drills. When not at the range I practice my getting off the X and draw to fire in my garage. When I do it, I include the mental imagining of the bullets impacting the cranial ocular cavity of the jihadi I imagine me up against. I also see him fall as I look down the slide and circle him; then I see the rapidly expanding pool of blood spreading out from his motionless body. I perform by after action assessment checking for other threats, getting my pistol back up to full capacity, I do my health check then I reset and do it all again.

    This method of training is not new, in fact it has been done in martial arts for hundreds of years. When you perform your pistol kata, you do not turn your brain off and mindlessly go through the motions. You make the pictures and feel the feelings you would if you were doing that particular movement in a real-life situation. This method helps to internalize the drill, so it stops being that “technique you do when . . .,” but simply becomes how you move and execute. It becomes part of you.

    Anything I can do to make my training time more efficient; I’m going to do it.
    Last edited by MaddMan; 10-08-2019 at 03:19 PM.
    Erik Maddocks
    Certified Firearms Instructor
    http://www.actajefferson.com
    https://www.facebook.com/acta.erikmadd/

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    474
    Thanks MaddMan

    For posting these Training Ideas. The examples that follow illustrates your points perfectly and I would lie to share them with you.

    When I trained with Kushido I was surprised to learn from my instructor that they only had 2 one hour Dojo classes a week at the headquarters and did not spend a lot of time receiving instruction.

    But then he went further and explained that the Head of the Style expected you to address "needed fixes" in technique immediately, this could be as soon as the next day, when you run into him again.

    He then pointed to his Left Foot and said that he corrected a Stance in one day. He first visualized himself in the Stance; then corrected his foot position by seeing himself moving and placing his Left Foot in the right position. He did this countless times during the day until he could visualize himself executing a perfect Stance-Moving into it without needing to check/adjust the left foot.

    After that he never concerned himself with the Stance again.

    Chris Bertish the Big Wave Surfer on the other hand used visualization to control fear,seeing himself riding the Impossible Wave the night before an important competition or when conditions were dangerous.

    Visualizing himself running into a problem while being on top of the wave and falling of. He would then come up with a solution and the surf the same wave again. He would continue to do this; running into an obstacle, falling, solving the obstacle and then surfing the same wave again, not allowing himself to fall asleep or rest until he had surfed the wave successfully.

    More than once the most dangerous/crucial wave of they day would be the exact same wave that he had visualized surfing the night before and he would run into the same obstacles that he had visualized running into and solving. This enabled him to stay calm and be in control of the situation.

    Cheers
    Elfie
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    492
    Quote Originally Posted by wheel View Post
    Sorry Guys

    For only replying today to these excellent comments, but I started reading Chris Bertish`s biography Sunday-The Big Wave Champion-And could could not put the book down or stop making notes until I finished it. I will post a Write-Up on Wednesday.
    Don't apologize for that. Part of this business is studying outside the "list of usual suspects" for information and techniques that can be applied. For example, Johan Harmenberg's
    "Epee 2.5" has some brilliant insights on sound strategy.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    474
    Afternoon Mike

    I apologized for not posting the review on the day I planned to, wanting to be a man of my word.

    Thanks for the heads p on the book I will check it out.

    But I whole heartedly agree with you. Countless opportunities to strengthen our tactics and mindset are out there if we just keep an open mind.

    Towards this end my radio is constantly on during the day listening to discussions by experts on various subjects. Looking for ways to improve or were politics/social issues are concerned being able to have an informed point of view and state these points intelligently.

    There is also a couple of journalists I make a point of reading in the weekend papers, whose thoughts sometimes gives me pause and allows me to re-evaluate my own beliefs and values-Each time improving the way I am able to articulate those thoughts to myself.

    I also enjoy learning about the lives of people and the lessons they share through their experiences.

    Recently I watched a movie about the James Bond actor George Lanzenby. In it he talks about something he learned while selling second hand cars-That if you don`t know what to say just listen; but then he added something else;ask them questions and then listen.

    This added another piece of the puzzle for me, not wanting to do all the talking-Keeping Your Secrets while the other person is still alive thread-But at the same time ot wanting a friend to feel uncomfortable, with awkward silences.

    I got to try it out last week and it worked, with a bunch of friends who dropped in.Talking less than when simply just biting my tongue and taking a sip of my coffee, but with the conversation flowing even better.

    Cheers
    Elfie
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    9,411
    I heard or read a quote long ago that has set my mentality and approach to training, it also relates to the recent simplicity article.

    “Amateurs practice until they get it right; Professionals practice until they can’t get it wrong”
    Greg "Hyena" Nichols
    Instagram: tacfit_az
    Facebook: SI Instructor Greg Nichols

    #thinkinginviolence
    #tactisexual

    Always entertaining, mildly offensive
    IANative: Indeed, when you grab Brent (or he grabs you), it feels like liquid unobtanium wrapped in rawhide... whereas Greg is just solid muscle wrapped in hate, seasoned w/ snuff and a little lead.

    http://www.warriortalk.com/showthrea...he-Obscenities

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •