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  1. #21
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    Shuto uke, usually translated (somewhat incorrectly) as “sword hand block”, works well as a close quarters strike.

    It requires strong internal structure. I find that how it’s usually taught (with the forward forearm perpendicular to the ground) results in very poor structure, making it very weak. Instead, strike the neck or face with elbow down and forearm at a 45 degree angle. This provides very solid structure.
    Brent Yamamoto
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  2. #22
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    Nov 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheel View Post
    I am currently reading a Jack Reacher novel in which he talks about how speed is just as important as force when kicking down a door.

    This got me thinking in how this principle applies to Striking and Kicking. In Boxing your Jab is usually taught as a faster Punch used to set up your Power Shots, which then follows the logic that your Power Techniques should by design be slower. Why else would you need a faster Punch to set up your Power Shots?

    Now I realize that the distance to the target, for example the Jab being a lot closer to the attacker than the Right Cross plays a role as well as the mechanics of executing a technique-A lead leg Roundhouse Kick to the attackers Front Knee is easier and therefore faster than the same kick executed with the Rear Leg.

    But knowing that words have power, are we not unintentionally slowing down when we want to Punch/Kick harder and then speed up again when we use the weapons that are closer to the attacker.

    If I am on to something here then Mike Tyson personifies this idea, a devastating Striker as well as one of the fastest Heavyweights.

    OSSU!
    Elfie
    Well, if you ask Freddie Roach who trained both Mike Tyson and Wladamir Klitchko, while tysons shots were faster and more explosive, Klitchkos were heavier and denser. Tyson rarely took people out in a single shot but in a combo. Rocky Marciano who was slower than Molasses has the highest KO percentage of any heavyweight champion. He literally broke opponnets wrist and elbows. Tyson never did that. The reason? Leverage. Not speed. Look at how georgr foreman hit. He destroyed people but was not fast. He turned into every shot. If speed alone was the factor then manny pacquiao would hit harder than klitchko or foreman. Its simply not true. There are two types of power, sharp power which is based on speed and diminishes as you age and leverage power which is the Foreman/marciano/tommy hearns power which comes from leverage, not speed and can last into old age.

  3. #23
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    Can you explain what you mean by leverage in the context of striking?

    A good strike is a combination of things. I think in terms of internal structure (in my experience this is where most people leak power from their strikes), weight (hitting heavy...which is related to structure but more about where one puts his weight into the target) and finally speed. Some people will simply not be able to develop much speed, no matter what they do. But I do think that structure and weight can be improved in everyone. Perhaps your interpretation of leverage is related to these attributes.

    But all things being equal, more speed is better. If one can hit heavy, getting faster will only create more impact.

    And I'm not sure I agree that hand speed decreases so much with age. Most things, yes...our bodies and reaction times get slower. But hands are still able to move quite fast. I always give the example of burning your hand on the stove...I'm sure an 80 year old can still move that hand damn fast when they touch a hot surface.

    But being able to apply that kind of speed is the trick. Those who keep training throughout their lives (particularly those that train smart to avoid injury) manage to retain impressive speed.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

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    Advanced Close Range Gunfighting - Nov 2-3 Mapleton, OR

  4. #24
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    Not much speed here but plenty of leverage. Look at the effect: https://youtu.be/ApQlzehYyfo

  5. #25
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    I think I've said three times now that it's a combination of things. But that all things being equal more speed is better.

    I still don't have a good understanding of what is meant by leverage in this context.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

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    Advanced Close Range Gunfighting - Nov 2-3 Mapleton, OR

  6. #26
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    Screenshot_20190924-155146_Gallery.jpg here is a bit about leverage. It means your power comes from your legs and the turning motion of the waste to get maximim weight behind the blow. Marciano used a 350lbs custom heavybag to develop his shot and learned to get maximum leverage to get it to move.

  7. #27
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    Ok cool. Now we are talking about the same thing after defining terms.

    I would consider leverage the same thing as structure and moving weight. Both of which I consider teachable and trainable things...though like many things, people have different capacities and capability for learning. And a guy that might have shitty structure can still hit a ton just because he's big (and thus can move weight).

    Of the three aspects, I consider structure the easiest to teach and learn (though in my experience not many martial arts schools do this well). I have KIDS in my class that have amazing structure, so this is not dependent on size and strength.

    Moving weight is a skill that can be taught and trained, but some people find this harder to do. And big guys can often do it just on the basis of being big and strong, even without much training.

    Speed can be trained but some people will simply never get there. But all things being equal, with more speed comes more power. I still maintain that improving all three is best.


    Interesting article. The trainer was wise to prioritize what he could improve with his fighter, and leave other things alone. A lot of athletes don't necessarily know HOW they do things, they just have a talent for doing them. A good trainer will recognize this and not mess with things that are working. But it's nonetheless clear from the article that the trainer recognized what and how improvements could be made (including speed specifically).

    The difference with a professional fighter, versus people like us, is that there's a window of time where the professional athlete can compete. We should all be in a constant state of chasing evolutionary improvement. But the professional fighter doesn't necessarily have the time to make a revolutionary change to his fighting style. He has to keep fighting all the time, and a revolutionary change often screws up what's working.

    More importantly...some people have more capacity for change than others. It sounds like this trainer recognized Marciano didn't have the time or capacity to radically change how he was fighting. So evolutionary rather than revolutionary changes. A good strategy for the given problem.

    As people focused on a martial discipline for a life time, we have different goals and different options available to us. We have a longer horizon and can take a longer view. We can take the time to make revolutionary changes to our training and fighting approach if we have the opportunity.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Advanced Close Range Gunfighting - Nov 2-3 Mapleton, OR

  8. #28
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    Jan 2014
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    What I think is being called leverage is really just utilization of rotational energy in the strikes. Foreman uses a closed kneeling stance to deliver the strikes, think modified Sanchin-dachi where you twist on the ball of the back foot to allow the hip to rotate. If you watch the strikes where Foreman really moves the bag (and the guy holding it) he takes a small step with the lead leg towards the 10:30 angle getting his body mass moving, then goes into a closed kneeling stance as he rotates for the strike.
    Erik Maddocks
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  9. #29
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    Aug 2005
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    478
    I agree with your thoughts on the Strike Brent and just like with the jump in Hein-Godan Kata, misunderstanding the intention of the technique-Using it like a Spear to penetrate the target-Causing the angle of the hand to change as well as training to be able to hit a hard target with just the fingertips, without the fingers collapsing on impact.

    Instead I believe that the strength of a Nukite-Strike is to enable one to target soft areas of the body effectively from any position,without much of a windup and needing to use very little power.

    Like the young kid in my first Dojo that dropped the much bigger guy with a Nukite-Strike to the groin.

    He was seated at his desk and saw the guy approaching and sensed that he was going to make his move after they had being going back and fourth for a few days. As the guy came to a stop in front of him, without thinking he struck first and the guy dropped ending the confrontation.

    Francisp,

    Another key reason that the made the above mentioned fighters such devastating punchers is that they all possessed a streak of meanness, with the desire not to only beat their opponent but to hurt him. Landing every punch with bad intentions.

    OSSU!
    Elfie
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

  10. #30
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    Sep 2016
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    2
    My dynamics Professor said many years ago, "F=ma is all you need to know!" I think what Brent and others are saying is supported by physics. Force = Mass x Acceleration can also be noted as Force = Mass x Velocity Squared. (acceleration = velocity squared). In order to increase the force applied you need to increase mass and/or acceleration. Obviously increasing mass can be done with weight training or over eating, but there are ways to exploit the mass you already have. I believe the connection or structure Brent describes helps increase the mass in your strike. If you punch with only your arm it will yield less force than if you are able to punch with good connection to your center (or elsewhere). Proper structure improves that connection. The ability to relax or "empty" reduces the muscle tension and thus increases the velocity (and acceleration) of the strike. Learning to do both amplifies the Force delivered considerably.

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