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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2000
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    Default 10 Benefits of Cross Crawl – Brain Hemisphere Synching Exercise – with Video

    I learned about the Cross-Crawl Concept back in 1986. It revolutionized my thinking of physical coordination and learning.

    CROSS CRAWL ARTICLE


    Cross crawl refers to movements in which we use opposition such as crawling, walking, running, and swimming. Opposition means that opposite sides of the body work together to coordinate the right arm and left leg, then the left arm and right leg.


    Therapeutically, cross crawl refers to any intentional cross-lateral activity in which you cross the mid-line of the body, such as touching opposite hand and knee or foot. Performing this movement builds the bridge between the right and left hemispheres of the brain, allowing for electrical impulses and information to pass freely between the two, which is essential for physical coordination as well as cerebral activities, such as learning language, reading, and hand-to-eye coordination.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Western WA
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    5,453
    I have not used that exercise, but I have incorporated different crawling exercises in the dojo for sometime. I absolutely think this is worthwhile.

    The level of coordination in people varies widely. Some students that I see it almost looks like their brain is not really connected to their body (not a criticism, just an observation). I read an article some years ago that hypothesized that children who had learned to walk quickly (meaning they had largely skipped the step of crawling) were strongly disadvantaged in coordination exercises later in life. I have since incorporated crawling drills, primarily for the kids but sometimes for the adults as well.

    Several of the kids in class had coordination challenges. One girl in particular, who was almost as tall as me at age 10 (!!!) had strong coordination challenges. She struggled with even some of our most basic exercises. I focused on crawling drills with her and was amazed at the difference in just a couple months. And I've seen similar, if less dramatic, improvements in almost all the kids with sustained crawling drills.

    Improvements with adults has been less dramatic, but I don't do it that much with adults. I think I will incorporate that more.

    I think the best version of crawling is demonstrated in this video. It's a surprisingly difficult exercise, and in order to do it correctly, you need to start slow (the tendency is to move hands & feet on each side together (right/right, left/left), rather than cross body (right hand/left foot, left hand/right foot).



    For those kids that are really challenged, I take it a step further and have them crawl on hands and knees. It seems stupid easy but I really believe it works.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    New Jersey
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    24
    In BJJ we do gator crawls during warmups. It’s similar to the bear crawl shown above but the hip of the extended leg touches the deck.
    To echo Mr. Yamamoto, I’ve witnessed some people have a lot of difficulty with this exercise. And now in retrospect after reading his post those were people who came in with little of no natural agility.
    Interesting!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    800
    I saw a good video on Ted talks about how those movements, such as Philipino stick work and various other drills are great for stroke recovery.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Washington State
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    1,592

    Default 10 Benefits of Cross Crawl – Brain Hemisphere Synching Exercise – with Video

    This issue and concept is exactly why infants need to cross-pattern crawl for a significant time prior to being taught to walk. Crawling around the house, stairs, and in the yard on dirt and grass is absolutely necessary for coordination development The kata-like movement drills we’re developing are another form of cross- pattern exercise.
    Last edited by Ted Demosthenes; 09-14-2019 at 10:16 AM.
    Ted Demosthenes
    Suarez International Staff Instructor

    2019 Classes:

    CRG-3 Advanced Gunfighting, November 2-3 2019, Mapleton, OR

    From Murphy: "Incoming has the right-of-way" (so, GOTFX!!)


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Washington State
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    1,592
    Quote Originally Posted by JimD View Post
    I saw a good video on Ted talks about how those movements, such as Philipino stick work and various other drills are great for stroke recovery.
    JimD
    Do you have a link to that talk or know the speaker’s name? I’ve watched it but couldn’t find it again.
    Ted Demosthenes
    Suarez International Staff Instructor

    2019 Classes:

    CRG-3 Advanced Gunfighting, November 2-3 2019, Mapleton, OR

    From Murphy: "Incoming has the right-of-way" (so, GOTFX!!)


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    203
    Now this is fascinating--time to integrate this into my movement work.

    I like the video that Brent posted, in particular. That chap's explanation of how to do the bear crawl makes a lot more sense than the butt-in-the-air method I've always done and was taught originally. I noted he looked an awful lot like a bear walking around, which is exactly the point, I should guess.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    800
    Ted,

    I'll try to see if I can find it, but off the top of my head I don't remember.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Washington State
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    1,592
    Wish I’d learned Gary’s version eight years ago when I started Xfit. It’s almost identical to kid’s hands & knees crawl and better structure than butt up which is hard on neck and back.
    Ted Demosthenes
    Suarez International Staff Instructor

    2019 Classes:

    CRG-3 Advanced Gunfighting, November 2-3 2019, Mapleton, OR

    From Murphy: "Incoming has the right-of-way" (so, GOTFX!!)


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    3,105
    Lacks centerline crossing, but what about the elliptical?
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

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    "Can I move?...I'm better when I move."

    1, 2, 11. And a wakeup.

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