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  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default OPTIMIZING THE J-FRAME

    Anything that is mass produced is done so in order to increase profit by decreasing costs. Some companies are all cost focused, in the scope of revolvers we have Ruger, and produce cheap guns for economy buyers. Other companies do the same, but their base framework can be improved upon greatly. Companies like Colt and S&W are examples.

    The J Frame, as we discussed is a ballistic set of brass knuckels. Not intended for much beyond arm's reach and just outside of that. I know that good fighters that shoot can extend this greatly, but that is like racing a Lambo in the Baja 500.

    What the J needs are as follows -

    A set of grips that are conducive to a comfortable grip as well as for deep concealment. Rubbery grips may be the choice for the recoil sensitive but will suck when you draw it from a pocket. And understand...if you are planning to carry in a holster there are better choices than a J. A J is for pocket carry, jock strap carry between the "pillar and the stones" to avoid the casual frisk, or in other places missed by conscript security. My choice are something in the G-10, or wood, or similar.

    A trigger that is manageable under duress. People that suggest a heavy trigger are fear-driven fools that have never faced death with a weapon in heir hand. Triggers need balance. Overly light in a revolver and you run into reliability issues. Overly heavy and your grip alignmet will be drastically affected. The Gunsmith Staff does a great job on revolver triggers and the combination of internal polishing, spring replacement and a better designed firing pin makes for a trigger pull much improved over the factory with the same reliability.

    The sights are fine. If you are in a situation needing such, you will have the time to do so. In most events, the J-frame will be used with grip-body-hand-eye-index shooting. That or inserted in a concave area of the body and the contents injected into the adversary.

    On an alloy weapon, such as my preference, the Airweight, there is no need for "dehorning" or any frame treatments. We needed this done on our old Model 60 Chief's Specials back in the dark ages. Today the Airweight weapons come with a nice smooth, snap free design.

    Shrouded hammers are preferred over exposed or bobbed hammers. Why? Read what I wrote buddy. Similarly I find that for this type of weapon and its real world application, a set of Speed Strips is far more concealable and thus more useful than any Speed Loader.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    5,432
    On speed strips: with the advent of 8-shot revolvers, 8-shot speed strips have followed. Although a little longer, the difference is negligible. What they allow you to do is to carry 6 rounds, 2x2x2 with a gap between. What *that* allows you to do is to always have a set of 2 rounds ready to go, regardless of how you grab the strip under stress.

    The key to functionally reloading a revolver is to understand that 2 chambers always lie in a straight line. So, you can pluck 2, reload 2, or you can dump everything and then get a fast 2, possibly followed by another 2. You're probably better off dumping those 2/4 into the other guy than getting all OCD about the 5th round.
    __________

    "To spit on your hands and lower the pike; to stand fast over the body of Leonidas the King; to be rear guard at Kunu-Ri; to stand and be still to the Birkenhead Drill; these are not rational acts. They are often merely necessary." Pournelle

  3. #3
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    May 2000
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    Now THAT is an excellent addition!!
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
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    5,509
    Agree 100% with Gabe's points.

    Grips - I despise rubber grips. Yeah they are nice for shooting but with a J the key priority is getting it into the fight. Rubber grips make that hard to do.

    There are lots of makers. I've gotten a couple grips from Altamont and I'm very pleased. They have a great selection, are very good quality and most important they have many functional models; you should be able to find something that fits you best. And they look nice to boot.

    On another thread, someone mentioned G10 and how it lends itself to shaping; they have a few G10 models to pick from.


    On optimization - I can attest to the SI gunsmith's staff skills with the J frame. My J is like a different gun after their careful attention.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    THIRD COAST
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    My choice in stocks are the VZ Grips. I really like the idea of the 8 shot speed strips. I’m in 100% agreement with Gabe and Brent. In the past I worked with the J Frame until 50 yard shots were no big deal, but it really shines for shooting them in the “taint” so to speak. There’s no better gun for contact distance.


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    Jon Payne
    Ambassador, Suarez Group of Companies
    Suarez International Law Enforcement Instructor

    The Two Most Dangerous Places in Today's World:
    1.) A Gun Free Zone
    2.) Your Comfort Zone

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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Wyoming
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    160
    Modified Altamonts:P1100279.jpg

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Kansas City, MO
    Posts
    1,103
    Very nice Holmes375. I've got those same grips on mine, love em.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Southeast United States
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    718
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Spade View Post
    On speed strips: with the advent of 8-shot revolvers, 8-shot speed strips have followed. Although a little longer, the difference is negligible. What they allow you to do is to carry 6 rounds, 2x2x2 with a gap between. What *that* allows you to do is to always have a set of 2 rounds ready to go, regardless of how you grab the strip under stress.

    The key to functionally reloading a revolver is to understand that 2 chambers always lie in a straight line. So, you can pluck 2, reload 2, or you can dump everything and then get a fast 2, possibly followed by another 2. You're probably better off dumping those 2/4 into the other guy than getting all OCD about the 5th round.
    A long time ago I read some stuff by Michael de Bethencourt, a chap who specialized in wheelguns and snubbies. He was a proponent of this technique, saying load what you can as fast as you can: Instead of struggling to reload all five, slap in four and do work; if you only have time to load one or two in order to kill your opponent, go for it.

    Also, that whole pile of crap about only loading five rounds in a 6-round speed strip is just that, of course: crap. Yes, this was espoused back in the day; after all, your snubbie only holds five rounds, so why carry six? The "genius" idea was the space from leaving out that extra round gave you more room to grip the strip. Yes, this was a thing. Saw it in many gun publications by the hands of more than one author. Like I said, crap. I often wondered if anyone paid with their life for listening to such flawed advice.

    They make 8-round speedstrips? Really? Shows you how much I keep up with revolver technology. Man, I gotta get some of those babies.
    Redneck Zen
    "Be careful what you get good at."

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    3,159
    VZ Grip.JPG

    I like the VZ grip as well. The only issue I had with it was the sharp ridge under the right thumb. The G-10 is very easy to shape if you want to get rid of it. IMO the comfort level goes way up once that is filed down.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pict View Post
    VZ Grip.JPG

    I like the VZ grip as well. The only issue I had with it was the sharp ridge under the right thumb. The G-10 is very easy to shape if you want to get rid of it. IMO the comfort level goes way up once that is filed down.
    These stocks fill the hand well, have a reasonably flat profile, and don’t grab clothing. They’re also incredibly light.


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    Jon Payne
    Ambassador, Suarez Group of Companies
    Suarez International Law Enforcement Instructor

    The Two Most Dangerous Places in Today's World:
    1.) A Gun Free Zone
    2.) Your Comfort Zone

    Train with Payne 2019

    AK RIFLE GUNFIGHTING - OCT 26-27, 2019 HOUSTON, TX

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