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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    414
    Brent

    Because I fight from a seated position Strikes that don`t use the hips and legs intrigues me.

    I also did not see the fight, only a minute long clip on Facebook that somebody sent me. If you go to Youtube and enter Hammer-fist Knockout from the Bottom Position the clip will pop up right at the top of the list.

    If one looks at MMA Fights a fighters Knockout wins early in their careers mostly occur in the Clinch:Elbows, Knees and Dirty Boxing.Then as the fighter grows more experienced the distance increases as the fighter learns to control the distance between him and his opponent. Replacing the natural instinct to Grab and Strike.

    With real fights and stabbings you see people take advantage of the instinct again, to grab and punch/stab where controlling the distance is not important.

    Another advantage of Holding and Punching is that you know where the person/target is. Cutting down on the time needed to visually find a target first, allowing you to land more attacks in the same amount of time, causing more damage.

    I read a account where a Karate Fighter was able to get back up and continue to fight after being knocked down and stomped by a group of attackers. He believes that the main reason that made him get back up was that he was used to it psychology, having being in that position often-Being knocked down and kicked by his stepbrother and his friends whenever he left the house as a small child.

    On the other hand people not familiar with fighting/violence could be stopped with one well placed technique or a minimal use of force.

    Brent and that is how I understand your point about the psychology in a fight. That we simply cannot know when facing the attacker what his life experiences are. What he is used to physically and psychology and therefore what it will take to stop him.

    OSSU!
    Elfie
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,407
    We were really discussing physiology - in this case what happens to the other guy's body, brain, etc. when you hit him. Essentially, terminal ballistics of the fist. I was making the point that how his body responds really doesn't change my plan of action (i.e. I'm going to him him hard until he stops bothering me). Of course how he reacts during the fight might change my choices, but that is a different subject.

    Psychology - that's a whole different subject. Greg touched on psychology with his comments about experience and how people who have actually been hit will respond differently than those who have not. And your point, about the guy getting up, this is very real. Once you have been through a significant experience (either in real life or in training), it changes you and your mind/body often retains those lessons very well.

    The guys that have been through pistol ground fighting....while they may not be ground fighting specialists, I think having been through that experience they have gained a set of skills that they will not lose, even if they do not keep all those ground skills razor sharp.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    414
    Morning Brent

    My apologies, at least my post still added some value to the discussion.

    OSU!
    Elfie
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    960
    Anyone watched the new Bareknuckle Fighting? Chris Leben of UFC fame has a go to of a half Muay Thai plum/trap head and then rain uppercuts into opponent’s jaw. I am convinced the fixing of the head causes the damage

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=tFqRS7RLBcM
    Last edited by twinboysdad; 08-02-2019 at 04:50 PM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    960
    Very relevant interview on grabbing and hitting

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=y0mcJr-Z8tg

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    414
    Thanks Twinboysdad

    This is the technique you see the most that leads to a knockout by less experienced Strikers here in the EFC when they use Dirty Boxing.

    I think the reason that you mostly see the Uppercut used is because it is the easiest Strike to start with, to learn how to hit hard while holding on to the opponent with the other hand-Adding power to the Punch by simply bending the knees slightly and driving up with the legs.

    Did you notice the small body shift out to the side to add a small hip twist to the Punches like you would see an a Traditional Boxing Hook.

    I like the Palm-Strike that he uses to cover his opponent`s vision when he closes the distance to hide the grab.The accidental finger also helped-Which is something that we can use, Combatives Tiger Claw Strike instead of just the open Palm.

    I wonder if the fighters will adopt the Vertical Punches like the earlier Bare Knuckle Fighters used. I remember that Jack Dempsey preferred to punch that way when fighting without gloves.

    It was also interesting to hear how he had to adjust to the reach of his punches with the different types of gloves. It made me think of people that train the Stick to train the Blade and wondered how many of them train with the same length Blade that the carry daily/if they only practice drills using sticks.

    Thanks again for posting the clips I enjoyed them.

    Cheers
    Elfie
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

  7. #17
    You can practice for this. Geoff Thompson had a drill where he would tie people's legs together, or had people stand up against a wall or even lay on the floor and hit pads to restrict movement. You had to generate power from other sources besides your legs or body weight. I've started to incorporate "restricted striking" into my training and when you can generate power from non traditional sources, it makes your traditional strikes even more powerful.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    414
    Vlad I did something similar when I got to teach at the Dojo, working with fairly new students, after reading an article about it.

    My favorite was starting from a seated position, kicking out at the knee and then to continue fighting-Pulling the attacker closer if you have long arm/Continue Striking while getting to your feet.

    Next I would tell them to now use the weapon that have become available to them fighting against a much bigger, stronger attacker/Multiple attackers that are now rushing towards them.

    They would look at me all dumbfounded until I pointed out the chair they just sat on a second ago. This was a great lead-in into a short discussion on improvised weapons and the concept of always being armed and using a tool to multiply force.

    I enjoyed hitting the Focus Mitts while the rest of the class practiced Grappling-Not training to become a better Striker but simply as a great Shoulder and fitness Workout. After awhile my training partners started to notice an increase in the power of my Strikes-Commenting that they could feel my punches "pop"

    I could not figure out how my punching power had improved until I realized that it was because I had being training my hips often-Increasing their mobility working them through a full Range of Motion, using Double Sticks-Powerful 45% Crosses, Short Snapping 90% turns and moving from side to side dynamically

    i had simply started to use my hips when punching.

    I have always thought that it could be a great way to increase a persons Punching Power, training the hips by isolating them, using Double Stick Drills from a seated position.

    It could of course also be useful on the ground being able to strike effectively of your back, only using small hip movements.

    OSSU!
    Elfie
    OSSU!
    ELFIE
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

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