Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Beyond The Wall
    Posts
    44,771

    Default INTERESTING VIDEO ON PRACTICALITY OF WRIST GRABS

    Its usually something taught in separate modules at schools. You know the one...women's self defense or some such thing where all real fighters kinda roll their eyes. But in this video the speaker puts this in the right context. I will say that I do not train defenses against grabs because all of it is in the katas. And if you train those in context, you automatically train such defenses.

    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,508
    I used to think that the wrist grab some stuff was silly. In fact it IS silly, but only from the perspective of 1. a stand-up competitive fighter (grabs are illegal) and 2. a striker who thinks only in terms of hitting another person. (Conditioning our thinking is insidious and hits even those who are aware of it.)

    As a man, and a good guy at that, I mainly think in terms of hitting another man in a fight. I think about proactively hitting him before he even realizes there is a fight. The emphasis is striking from surprise, fight is over.

    I would never proactively grab a man’s wrist in an attempt to control him. That is just not the way I think or act. And it is not the way men attack other men. At least not proactively.

    But the predator trying to control, not necessarily strike, a weaker victim is something altogether different. Just because it’s not something I would not do isn’t proof that it doesn’t happen. Also, we have to remember that fighting is not necessarily the same thing as self protection (the goal of fighting is to win, the goal of self protection is not to lose, i.e. get away). The various defenses against a proactive wrist grab thus make a lot of sense for women and children.

    But they also make sense for men, even if we are primarily focused on winning a fight and not just getting away. As discussed in that video, the wrist grab may be an involuntary reaction of the attacker when the defender raises his hands in surprise.

    As a striker, the idea of someone grabbing my wrist bothers the hell out of me. I want my hands free so I can hit them back. This was colored by my early training in karate.

    I learned a totally different perspective when I started training aikido. There view is that the bad guy is not hitting me with the hand he is grabbing me with. His hand is busy and therefore not able to hurt me. It is a gift, he is giving me an opportunity to control him. I find that this is an incredibly useful outlook.

    Sometimes we just want to get our hands free. I call these techniques “releases” and they are some of the easiest things we do. Stuff to teach beginners.

    Other times we use the attackers grab to our advantage. We allow him to hold onto us because his point of contact gives us an opportunity to steal his balance, control his posture, and create openings for strikes, throws, and joint attacks. Or a combination of all three.

    Sidenote: I am not a big advocate of “joint locks”, at least not for truly violent attackers that are actively resisting. ( though they can be very useful for people you need to control who are not a truly dangerous threat.) But often times a joint lock is easily turned into a joint destruction, either breaking or dislocating the joint or tearing tendons and muscles. These are never techniques that I plan on doing, but they are techniques of opportunity. Sometimes the attacker gives you a gift and it is often faster to attack the joint in those circumstances then to release your limb and follow up with the strike. Thus they are very useful things to develop competency.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Advanced Close Range Gunfighting - Nov 2-3 Mapleton, OR

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Western WA
    Posts
    5,508
    I will also add that in terms of priority for learning and training time, I consider joint lock/attack to be the lowest importance. I am happy I know that stuff, but for those not willing to dedicate the time to it, I am wouldn’t bother.

    Releases from the various wrist grabs - these are simple but important.

    Learning how to manipulate another body, learning how to feel where their weight and balance is, that is a little deeper and I think it’s important. However, this stuff is mostly taught in systems that emphasize joint locks - Aikido, Jujutsu, Hapkido, Chin-na. To me the joint lock is not so important...but the fact is that learning how to control and use a person’s weight, posture and balance is usually facilitated by joint lock practice.

    Where this stuff is most useful, IMO, is in systems like Okinawa Karate where we DO grab the other guy, whether it’s wrist or shoulder or hair or whatever, and control him in order to break his balance and create opening/opportunity for strikes. Think hammer and tongs - one hand holds and manipulates, the other smashes.

    Sadly, at least in my experience, competition oriented striking systems do not teach this very well, if at all.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

    Upcoming classes:

    Advanced Close Range Gunfighting - Nov 2-3 Mapleton, OR

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    476
    A good tip to share when teaching Wrist Escapes in the beginning is: That it is easier to escape the grip of your attacker if you only attack one finger instead of four. Turning your Wrist towards the thumb.

    What I do, not able to use my body-weight to help me escape is to:

    Grab the attacker`s wrist with my other hand and pull him towards me. While at the same time pulling the Trapped Wrist Up and Out to the side strongly-The Escape.

    I add a Twist to the wrist-So the thumb points down-Which makes the escape stronger and the Freed Wrist continuous up and Strikes the attacker with a bottom of the fist, Hammer-Fist Strike.

    It is a very smooth and easy escape to pull of. Even when performing the escape multiple times in training, with your training partner knowing exactly what to expect and able to Counter your efforts it is still very effective.

    The idea I got from a guy demonstrating grappling techniques for Wheelchair Users on Youtube.

    The key that makes this technique work is that your hands are at your Center-Line where the Wheelchair User is strongest in a Grappling situation.

    You must fight to keep your arms there and not allow the attacker:

    a. To press down on your arms, leaning on you with his weight-With your hands ending up near/on your lap.

    b. Opening up your Guard, pressing backon your arms. The action resembling the starting position of a Machine-Fly.

    In both cases it is impossible to fight back from there to your Guard again. And the attacker will pin your arms and pill you from your chair.

    TRAINING NOTE:

    You train the escape every time you twist your wrist executing the basic Blocks in the Kata`s do a Morote Block and the start of Hein/Pinan-Sandan Kata-Twisting Out and Down at the same time.

    OSSU!
    Elfie
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •