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  1. #11
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by TangoFoxtrot View Post
    They are promoting unsafe activities for overweight people. Is Nike going to pay their medical bills because they actually tried to work out or run while that heavy?
    So fat people shouldn't work out?
    ===========================
    Quantum materiae materietur marmota monax si marmota monax materiam possit materiari?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Anthony View Post
    So fat people shouldn't work out?
    I don't think he meant that. I suspect it was a joke.

    My biggest issue with this entire body love movement is that is accepts giving up as normal and actually embraces it. Not everyone is going to look like a fitness model, but even the most endo of endo morphs will benefit from eating properly and having life long involvement in physical activity.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

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  4. #14
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    This is just my opinion. I typically see moderately overweight people doing very light workouts at the gym, but rarely ever see anyone as fat as that mannequin more than once. The last really obese woman I saw in the weight room was sitting down and crying. I don't think that low impact exists at that weight. A permanent injury to the knee is no help and I think injuries will result from that Nike promotion. I think it better to forget about workout clothing and go on a diet until they reach normal BMI. Then start workouts once their weight is appropriate for their bones, ligaments, and joints. It seems like most of the overweight people I know are having knee replacement surgery. One of my cousins retired and started going on walks. Now this week she is in the hospital recovering from knee surgery.

  5. #15
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    I was listening to an interview on the radio discussing fashion models who has successful careers despite not fitting the stereotypical mold, having being born with some type of disability-I hate that word.

    But then the conversation soon turned to overweight/plus size models and how it was also wrong to discriminate against their disability-There`s that word again.

    This is were I take personal offence. Being overweight is not a disability. And I would gladly take their legs/able to move around freely of their hands and hand over my chair for them to be disabled.

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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by TangoFoxtrot View Post
    This is just my opinion. I typically see moderately overweight people doing very light workouts at the gym, but rarely ever see anyone as fat as that mannequin more than once. The last really obese woman I saw in the weight room was sitting down and crying. I don't think that low impact exists at that weight. A permanent injury to the knee is no help and I think injuries will result from that Nike promotion. I think it better to forget about workout clothing and go on a diet until they reach normal BMI. Then start workouts once their weight is appropriate for their bones, ligaments, and joints. It seems like most of the overweight people I know are having knee replacement surgery. One of my cousins retired and started going on walks. Now this week she is in the hospital recovering from knee surgery.
    Working with several hundred individual athletes every year, and seeing who knows how many more while I'm in gyms, I'll have to disagree a bit. Overweight people can absolutely be working out, even including "real" weights, before they have "dieted to a normal BMI" (I hate that phrase, but that's a whole other discussion).

    The issue as I see it is twofold: One, many overweight people are VERY worried about how they'll be perceived in a gym environment (hell, look at replies in this thread so far), so they don't seek out the guidance they need, trying instead to just get into the gym, avoid stares (real or imagined) from others, and get out, maybe stress-eating afterward to calm themselves. Without proper guidance, almost all of them are just set up for failure, and end up right back where they started, eventually.

    Two, the lack of critical thinking and actual individualized coaching in the fitness industry is staggering. Most "trainers" or whatever else they call themselves don't have the knowledge, real-world experience, aptitude, and adaptability to actually effect change in people who need their help. People who are legitimately overweight and trying to change their fitness don't need someone who's mentally checked-out and is just parroting fitness advice.

    I work with athletes from absolute beginners to the 1% of the 1% in their sports, and the biggest difference I see in success stories across the board comes down to smart coaches who can actually connect with their athletes and PROPERLY lead them along the way. I'm in...I dunno; 75+(?) Crossfit gyms per year, plus a bunch of other training environments, and I see overweight people getting coached (and coach a bunch myself) all the time. Some coaches get it and appropriately modify movements and workouts in a smart manner that promotes health and longevity in their athletes' movement patterns, and some make me cringe.

    If I'm training an overweight athlete (my business revolves around training gymnastics-type movement), things are scaled and modified to whatever level will keep them healthy AND motivated and engaged in what they're learning. I'm nothing but encouraging, and also talk to them without the BS most people do. Not bullcrap like "You can do this if you just believe you can!", but things like, "Here are the movements you can train safely right now that will set the stage for your body learning how to do the whole thing safely. If you're staying on top of your nutrition plan and workouts, you'll keep making progress until your body catches up, and then we'll really start to see things happen." They appreciate that I'm not dancing around the issue that they're the fat person in the session (they're hyper-aware of it when everyone else is jacked and has abs popping out below their sports bras), and I'm not just sticking them in the corner and ignoring them while I work with the "real athletes." And those people have made progress when I see them again down the road.

    If I'm in a gym environment in a non-professional capacity, I'm nothing but encouraging--or treating them the exact same way I treat everyone else (read: ignoring them and focusing on myself)--to overweight people. I'll be damned if I'm ever the reason behind someone who's trying to better their life going home and giving up on their fitness journey after a gym session, due to my words or actions.

    So yeah, fat people need workout clothes.

    But I wouldn't mind if Nike made them less revealing, you know?
    ===========================
    Quantum materiae materietur marmota monax si marmota monax materiam possit materiari?

  7. #17
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    I have had a few fat kids in class approach me and ask how to unfuck their bodies. Here is what I tell them.

    1. Get on a keto diet for six months and then taper to Paleo.

    2. If they can contact a legit trainer, they should. But if not, get Starting Strength and read it. Learn the movements as well as any alternate movements if you need to. Start ridiculously light and build. Lets talk again in a year.

    3). Stay away from long duration aerobics. Do go for walks on the non lifting days.

    4). Find a progressive anti aging doc that looks the part and get blood work done to determine if endo system needa tweaking.

    Last year I had a guy that was so fat he could barely walk to the target line. I saw him earlier this year and he reported teary eyed that he'd lost some 50 pounds and gotten his life back. I could barely recognize him.

    Nothing is impossible.
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  8. #18
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    Nov 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Anthony View Post
    If I'm in a gym environment in a non-professional capacity, I'm nothing but encouraging--or treating them the exact same way I treat everyone else (read: ignoring them and focusing on myself)--to overweight people. I'll be damned if I'm ever the reason behind someone who's trying to better their life going home and giving up on their fitness journey after a gym session, due to my words or actions.
    Agree 100% on this. Someone who is trying to lose a lot of weight - not 10-15 lbs, but 100 or so - has a long, long road ahead of them. Years, not months. And it's damned discouraging to lose 30-40 lbs, look in the mirror...and not really be able to see any change. Encourage the possible.

    And you're right about the workout clothes. Round people know they are round...they really don't need or want clothes that emphasize the fact.

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