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  1. #1
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    Default THERE IS ONLY ATTACK AND COUNTER ATTACK

    THERE IS NO DEFENSE...ONLY ATTACK AND COUNTER ATTACK.


    While I am most known for my studies and resulting work with combat firearms, my immersion in martial arts, notably Karate, began much earlier, and truly, serves as a basis for much of what I teach with firearms today. Karate, real karate is much more than a kick punch system for winning sparring matches and for impressing onlookers.


    Real karate has always been a civilian system of fighting, and all the spiritual issues associated with it today were added in the twentieth century to make it acceptable for the masses. But if we read the accounts of the original founders, they were hardly the politically correct navel gazers who never threw the first punch idolized in the popular media. The real Miyagi, for example was a very dangerous man, and rightly so.


    One concept in real Karate is that of "UKE". Written this way - 受け


    In superficial Karate it is simply to receive an attack and defend it. Thus an Uke is a block to a punch, or a throw to a grab, as examples. But Uke or "receiving" has far deeper meanings if we study. For example, a block or any sort of defense can instantly be turned into a counter attack. And if that is possible, the opponent's attack need not even be blocked. It can be avoided and a counter attack launched. Thus the "block" or the defense is simply not being where the attack is intended.


    An attack can be "received" at a subconscious level - much like chess, you see the board before you and you can bet the other man is going to do something. While you may not overtly prepare for it, you have just done so mentally. And maybe position yourself so his attack is snuffed the moment he considers it. You can win a fight without ever having to get physical with this concept.


    And an attack can be stopped at conception by preempting it.


    Uke can also be, and usually is, a preemptive attack. A fight is about to happen, you know this without a doubt. So before the adversary's attack becomes a reality, you launch your own, defeating him before he is ever in the fight.


    If you see parallels here between empty hand work, contact weapons work, firearms work, and even simple strategy and tactics, then you are looking at this correctly. This is what the old masters meant when they said karate was for so much more than just self-defense.


    What we teach can be said to be "Karate with firearms".
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
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    Especially for Westerners, and that word was chosen for a reason, the default is to wait for the BG to make the first move.

    This is wrong. Know you're in a fight. Act accordingly. Forget what they taught you in grade school.

    And pilgrim, forget what you learned in the movies.
    Warrior for the working day.

    Es una cosa muy seria. --Robert Capa

    "...I ride the range in a Ford V8...Yippy Yi Yo Ki Yay." --Johnny Mercer

    "Can I move?...I'm better when I move."

    1, 4, 11. And a wakeup.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    381
    Gabe & Papa

    I worked on my post about the misguided meaning of Uke-Never Taking the Hammer out of the Toolbox earlier in the day and posted it on the forum before reading your post Cabe and your reply Papa.

    It was not an attempt to hijack the threat but simply a coincidence.

    Have a great evening.

    OSSU!
    Elfie
    HALFMAN HALFCAR

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    It has been a long stretch of days, so I am not sure I understand. Uke is kind of like a preemption? I am thinking first, even if not acting first. I am thinking "if he throws a straight punch at my face, slip outside and parry, step to his back and punch him in the kidney" based on his stance, actions, hand position etc. However, I might not move yet.
    Am I tracking, or completely lost?
    Soli Deo Gloria

  5. #5
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    Uke, when talking about techniques, is usually translated as “block”. It really means “receiving” but for the beginning student, that incorrect translation of “block” is probably good enough. It’s wrong but it differentiates these techniques from things that are pure strikes (punches, elbows, etc.)

    A very simple example: Jodan Age Uke - “Upper Rising Block”. Not exactly correct but good enough in the beginning.

    The kindergarten karate version looks like this:
    073BBD63-4372-41A7-BA73-1361F791ADBD.jpg
    Good guy recognizes bad guy but stands and waits (like an idiot). Bad guy fires a punch at him. Good guy blocks the punch and then fires back. It is “one, two” timing. This is fine for kids starting out but too slow for the real world. At the point of the block things are still even, 50/50, and the bad guy can strike again. Whoever is faster will get in the second shot.

    A better, more realistic way to look at uke:
    D513268C-EAD7-4DD0-A35B-052F7F836236.jpg
    Bad guy initiates the attack but good guy preempted it, stuffing the attack before it really started.

    Uke is often considered defensive, but that’s not correct. Some people will say “all blocks are attacks”, which is much closer to the truth but also a little misleading.

    Uke encompasses the concept if initiative. The bad guy often starts with the initiative. Uke Waza (Receiving Techniques) are about taking the initiative back.

    You can think of the various strikes as proactive. You have the initiative and you hit the guy in the face. Whereas the different receiving techniques as reactive. Bad guy starts it but you receive it in such a way that you avoid damage while stealing the initiative back. It IS an attack, but it’s a lot deeper than just hitting the other guy’s arm. You are attacking his posture, disrupting his center of gravity, stealing his initiative and stuffing it back in his face.

    The timing of uke is not “one, two”, it is ONE. Receiving techniques avoid damage while attacking back, all in ONE move.

    It is much deeper than just a “blocking technique”, it’s a mind set and method of stealing initiative.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

  6. #6
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    Another example...

    This is more of a dojo teaching tool but it has relevance to the real world.

    The student and I will face each other, far enough apart that he must take a step in order to reach me. When the student decides to attack, he will step forward and try to punch me. The student starts with the initiative.

    While I wait for the attack, I watch the student’s face. I am not looking for a physical tell, such as a dropped shoulder or shifting weight. What I look for is the DECISION to launch...Even my best students, while they do not have any physical tells, I can still see their decision to go. There is a lag between the point of decision, and the actual physical initiation of attack. It is within that lag that I throw my attack. The student starts the action, but I beat him to the punch. Not based on speed but on timing.

    Even though there is no “blocking technique” involved, this is still UKE. It is receiving an attack and simultaneously stealing back the initiative.

    Think about how this could be applied to gun fighting. Think about how this could be applied to life.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

  7. #7
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    Nov 2018
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    153
    Practicing preemption like this seems like an excellent application of what in TKD we called "one-step sparring" (first sequence of pics Brent posted), but applied like the second shot and his dojo drill.

    Seems this also applies the flowchart--this is about how to anticipate what will come, have it run through the flowchart already so that as soon as you get the tell/action/other indicator necessary to achieve proper justification beyond the simple intuition that you were about to get killed, your OODA loop already has the pistol drawn and needs merely the final domino to fall, as it were, before the gun is actually drawn.

    This is a mental game indeed. I need to think on this for a while.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    THAT is real Karate...what Brent posted. Real ANYTHING is rare in a world and for a people where entertainment and sport is the paramount level of achievement. Real Karate is not the Kindergarten crap you see in McDojo...and for that matter in ANY martial discipline offered to the masses regardless of origin or focus.

    Real karate is different...old karate is different. As has been said before...sometimes the old ways are best. Bring Back the Old Ways
    Gabriel Suarez

    Turning Lambs into Lions Since 1995

    Suarez International USA Headquarters

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
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    153
    This seems to fit as well with the footwork video you posted in the Real Martial Arts forum, at the point of application of the mindset: each of the movements that chap demonstrated flowed from a mindset focused on actually hurting someone instead of slapping a chest protector.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Suarez View Post
    Real karate is different...old karate is different. As has been said before...sometimes the old ways are best. Bring Back the Old Ways
    My teacher, Hiroo Ito:

    There are two types of Karate: Strong Karate, and weak Karate.
    Brent Yamamoto
    Suarez International Tier 1 Staff Instructor

    Ready, willing, able. Bring it.

    Instagram: karate_at_1200fps

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