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Thread: TSS shot

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
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    Cincinnati, Ohio
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    I would take a cold hard pass on these for hunting. Since it is a very hard material, it is more likely to create finer particulate matter than lead.

    It was at first believed to be relatively inert and an only slightly toxic metal, but beginning in the year 2000, the risk presented by tungsten alloys, its dusts and particulates to induce cancer and several other adverse effects in animals as well as humans has been highlighted from in vitro and in vivo experiments.[104][105] The median lethal dose LD50 depends strongly on the animal and the method of administration and varies between 59 mg/kg (intravenous, rabbits)[106][107] and 5000 mg/kg (tungsten metal powder, intraperitoneal, rats).[108][109]

    People can be exposed to tungsten in the workplace by breathing it in, swallowing it, skin contact, and eye contact. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has set a recommended exposure limit (REL) of 5 mg/m3 over an 8-hour workday and a short term limit of 10 mg/m3.[110]

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by WraithWolf View Post
    I would take a cold hard pass on these for hunting. Since it is a very hard material, it is more likely to create finer particulate matter than lead.

    It was at first believed to be relatively inert and an only slightly toxic metal, but beginning in the year 2000, the risk presented by tungsten alloys, its dusts and particulates to induce cancer and several other adverse effects in animals as well as humans has been highlighted from in vitro and in vivo experiments.[104][105] The median lethal dose LD50 depends strongly on the animal and the method of administration and varies between 59 mg/kg (intravenous, rabbits)[106][107] and 5000 mg/kg (tungsten metal powder, intraperitoneal, rats).[108][109]

    People can be exposed to tungsten in the workplace by breathing it in, swallowing it, skin contact, and eye contact. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has set a recommended exposure limit (REL) of 5 mg/m3 over an 8-hour workday and a short term limit of 10 mg/m3.[110]
    Good data WW.
    I believe it is still legally ok for water fowl hunting in contrast to lead shot that is not. I wonder what happens to Tungsten shot in the environment and if it gets swallowed by ducks.
    According to one source the composition of their TSS is
    Composition:W-Ni-Fe ,W content 90-97%
    W = tungsten
    A 2008 study found that it is not highly toxic to the environment. But I still am not sure.
    Below is the abstract which is legal to copy paste and I have the link to the article.
    abstract https://www.nps.gov/pinn/learn/natur...sed%20shot.pdf
    The toxicity of elemental tungsten released from discharged shot was assessed against previous studies
    that established a 1% toxic threshold for soil organisms. Extremely heavy theoretical shot loadings of69,000shot/ha were used to generate estimated environmental concentrations (EEC) for two brands oftungsten-based shot containing 51% and 95% tungsten. The corresponding tungsten EEC values were6.513.5 mg W/kg soil, far below the 1% toxic threshold. The same shot loading in water producedtungsten EEC values of 2.14.4mg W/L, levels that are not toxic under experimental conditions. Puretungsten has not been shown to exhibit carcinogenic properties when ingested or embedded in animaltissues, but nickel, with which it is often alloyed, has known carcinogenicity. Given the large number ofwaterfowl that carry shot embedded in their body, it is advisable to screen lead shot substitutes for theircarcinogenic potential through intra-muscular implantation.&2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved
    EEC = estimated environmental concentration (EEC)
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  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
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    85
    Quote Originally Posted by barnetmill View Post
    Good data WW.
    I believe it is still legally ok for water fowl hunting in contrast to lead shot that is not. I wonder what happens to Tungsten shot in the environment and if it gets swallowed by ducks.
    According to one source the composition of their TSS is W = tungsten
    A 2008 study found that it is not highly toxic to the environment. But I still am not sure.
    Below is the abstract which is legal to copy paste and I have the link to the article.
    EEC = estimated environmental concentration (EEC)
    Excellent follow up data, I am sure there is some risk to the environment with these. I believe the greatest risk, would come to people who are eating waterfowl that has been shot with these loads, or predators/scavengers that eat carcasses carrying tungsten shot. Even with careful cleaning, there will likely be significant particulate matter in the tissue. Also by firing these loads, you are going to inhale a non-negligible amount of dust and have it deposited on the skin. That is already a concern with lead, which is softer and less likely to create the amount of fine particulate nano-particles that something of this hardness is prone to under stress. I would stick to steel for waterfowl hunting. Never had any issues with the steel hexagonal shot dropping birds. Factor in the cost of these, and its a no-brainer to me. Steel provides enough wear and tear on barrels as is, this can be more than double the hardness. Steels can reach 900–1100 HV30kgf, while Tungsten can reach beyond 2200 HV30kgf. Would never shoot this in any shotgun I own.

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