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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    UNited States
    Posts
    136
    Quote Originally Posted by sfc View Post
    I picked up a OSS suppresor for my 7.62 draco micro. I'm still waiting for the tag but it should be here shortly. I liked that it pushed the gas forward and so it should allow for the pistol to cycle normally, even while suppressed - which isn't true of the traditional baffle designs. This is the one I got: https://osssuppressors.com/suppressors/helix/#hx-qd-762
    I want the OSS design. Push gas out the front, cleaner, no blowback, counter threaded, no need to adjust gas system. Except for a niche use or money, if this isn't everyone's top 1 or 2 pick, I would like to know why?
    The Omega 9K has the advantages if you want something short and light.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    23
    I have an Advanced Armament M4-2000 that I run on my Sig MCX SBR (12" barrel) and my Robinson XCR-L SBR (12" barrel). Both are 5.56. I just ordered a Thunder Chicken by Q. I want the direct thread option and to be able to use it on 300 and 7.62. The M-4 2000 is 5.56 only. Good luck in your search. It's not any easy choice.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    174
    I've always used Surefire, and other than pairing the 762 SOCOM RC with 300 Blackout subs (it doesnt do well with subsonics), I've always been happy.

    Things to keep in mind:

    -POI shift is a condition of the barrel, not so much the suppressor. I have cans that have seen shift 0moa and shift 8 moa. Same can, different guns.
    -Suppression at the muzzle vs at the ear is a very important distinction to make. Are you about total signature, or signature at your ear?
    -Backpressure sucks.
    Last edited by UNO; 04-17-2019 at 01:40 AM.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Southeast Florida
    Posts
    1,725
    Quote Originally Posted by RobertGuy View Post
    I want the OSS design. Push gas out the front, cleaner, no blowback, counter threaded, no need to adjust gas system. Except for a niche use or money, if this isn't everyone's top 1 or 2 pick, I would like to know why?
    The Omega 9K has the advantages if you want something short and light.
    I'm a bit of an expert on OSS, since I've been following them closely for many years. I think they have a pretty cool product, but they suffer greatly (in my opinion) from a rocky history and a lot of ignorant opinions expressed across the Internet.

    While the original product line did what they claimed it did (eliminate back-pressure increase, generate good sound levels at the ear) it was admittedly heavy, complicated, and expensive. To make things worse, they were pretty loud at the muzzle compared to traditional designs and very few people were measuring levels at the ear at the time and a lot of suppressor owners and consumers had no idea just how loud most competitors were at the ear. The typical narrative was that if you were below 140 db it was hearing safe, but all people had were muzzle measurements and they didn't realize that on an AR-15, if you are in the mid 130's at the muzzle you were probably in the low to mid 140's at the ear. OSS tried to come up with a new design that did much better at the ear but they had a steep hill to climb educating the consumer base, and people were very quick to opine without realizing their ignorance and incomplete information.

    New management and ownership took over in 2016 and continued to sell the legacy products while working on improvements. 2 years later (last year) they came out with a new product line that was lighter, cheaper, and more simple to use. We have enough independent meter data to be confident that they do quite well at the ear compared to most competitors, and while the muzzle levels are still a bit higher it's not that bad. On a typical 16" AR-15 with a normal gas block you can get mid 130's at the ear and high 130's at the muzzle. I haven't seen any competitor achieve those ear numbers without an adjustable gas block--most are still above 140 db, and if you see something in the low 130's at the muzzle it's probably in the mid 140's at the ear!

    So I think they should be high on anybody's list of possibilities, especially if you don't want to mess with adjusting the gas whenever it goes on or off. I just think it makes so much sense for a suppressor to have no effect on the action of the rifle when it's attached. But there is still a lot of negative opinion whenever you bring them up on the Internet.

    If weight is a priority, then the top consideration on my list right now is Thermal Defense--they are doing 3D printing and have some pretty cool products on paper, I'm just waiting to see some independent metering. Greg, you should check out their Bantam--it's 3.8" long, 1.2" diameter, and only 6 oz but they say it's still "hearing safe" at the ear:

    https://thermaldefenseinc.com/products/bantam/

    From the patent details I've seen, it looks like they are doing a hybrid of traditional baffle design and the OSS concept--they are taking the gas coming into the baffles, channeling it in spirals around the perimeter, and letting it escape out the front. FWIW the designs are generated by Oak Ridge Laboratory, they just do the manufacturing and sales part of the process.

    The Witt Machine product sounds a bit too good to be true to me--I'm reserving judgement until I see some quality meter data.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    UNited States
    Posts
    136
    OSS just released their 9MM and .22LR rimfire (I 'm going to be learning more about using 22LR for a AR15/556 understudy, but I don't yet understand the attachment to standard AR15 barrel).

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Southeast Florida
    Posts
    1,725
    Quote Originally Posted by RobertGuy View Post
    OSS just released their 9MM and .22LR rimfire (I 'm going to be learning more about using 22LR for a AR15/556 understudy, but I don't yet understand the attachment to standard AR15 barrel).
    I'm not sure about 9mm, I know that they are working on that but as far as I know the release yesterday was just .22 (and .17 HMR, 5.7, etc.). It's an interesting design because while it includes more traditional baffles, it also allows the gas to circulate around the perimeter and exit out the front. So they are saying that means that .22 will not get it so dirty (because it's not trapping all the gas like a normal design), and when you use higher pressure rounds or calibers you'll get the reduction in back-pressure compared to conventional designs. Definitely sounds interesting, and based on the metering done by Silencer Shop it's pretty comparable to popular competitors, at least on a 10/22.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    174
    Quote Originally Posted by mike135 View Post
    I'm a bit of an expert on OSS, since I've been following them closely for many years. I think they have a pretty cool product, but they suffer greatly (in my opinion) from a rocky history and a lot of ignorant opinions expressed across the Internet.

    While the original product line did what they claimed it did (eliminate back-pressure increase, generate good sound levels at the ear) it was admittedly heavy, complicated, and expensive. To make things worse, they were pretty loud at the muzzle compared to traditional designs and very few people were measuring levels at the ear at the time and a lot of suppressor owners and consumers had no idea just how loud most competitors were at the ear. The typical narrative was that if you were below 140 db it was hearing safe, but all people had were muzzle measurements and they didn't realize that on an AR-15, if you are in the mid 130's at the muzzle you were probably in the low to mid 140's at the ear. OSS tried to come up with a new design that did much better at the ear but they had a steep hill to climb educating the consumer base, and people were very quick to opine without realizing their ignorance and incomplete information.

    New management and ownership took over in 2016 and continued to sell the legacy products while working on improvements. 2 years later (last year) they came out with a new product line that was lighter, cheaper, and more simple to use. We have enough independent meter data to be confident that they do quite well at the ear compared to most competitors, and while the muzzle levels are still a bit higher it's not that bad. On a typical 16" AR-15 with a normal gas block you can get mid 130's at the ear and high 130's at the muzzle. I haven't seen any competitor achieve those ear numbers without an adjustable gas block--most are still above 140 db, and if you see something in the low 130's at the muzzle it's probably in the mid 140's at the ear!

    So I think they should be high on anybody's list of possibilities, especially if you don't want to mess with adjusting the gas whenever it goes on or off. I just think it makes so much sense for a suppressor to have no effect on the action of the rifle when it's attached. But there is still a lot of negative opinion whenever you bring them up on the Internet.

    If weight is a priority, then the top consideration on my list right now is Thermal Defense--they are doing 3D printing and have some pretty cool products on paper, I'm just waiting to see some independent metering. Greg, you should check out their Bantam--it's 3.8" long, 1.2" diameter, and only 6 oz but they say it's still "hearing safe" at the ear:

    https://thermaldefenseinc.com/products/bantam/

    From the patent details I've seen, it looks like they are doing a hybrid of traditional baffle design and the OSS concept--they are taking the gas coming into the baffles, channeling it in spirals around the perimeter, and letting it escape out the front. FWIW the designs are generated by Oak Ridge Laboratory, they just do the manufacturing and sales part of the process.

    The Witt Machine product sounds a bit too good to be true to me--I'm reserving judgement until I see some quality meter data.
    The main detractor for me was their cans puking their guts in front of god and everybody during admittedly gentle testing on numerous occasions. Then they would slash prices and come out with Gen 37,927! and the cycle would repeat.

    At this point, though, I have heard from those I trust, that they have finally evolved the product to the point of viability. Now it's a case of "I have nearly a dozen Surefire cans..." but I really do appreciate their progression, as well as the solid concepts they espouse. You are 100% right about port-pop, and everyone trying to "But at the muzzle!" compare suppressors. At the ear is what matters. Quietest cans for the shooter are what I want. Ironically, those cans ALSO produce the least backpressure, which lessens fouling significantly, and over-drives the gun a lot less violently, extending parts life as well as increasing reliability.

    OSS may well be the "wave of the future", but I got into NFA with Surefire, and so that's kindof where I am, for the time being, and prefer their mini cans for the reasons above.

  8. #38
    I have a Gemtek Trek I picked up used a few years ago for a song and just ordered another for less than $350. It is not the quietest thing out there but i donít care to chase that goal on .556. I put on a Rubber City adjustable gas key and it really smoothed out my mid-length dissipator. I think the Trek is an ideal size.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #39
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    984
    My buddy Don, just posted this review on the OSS 762.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QGAo00Lxs0w

    John
    "Play stupid games, win stupid prizes" Alan Temby
    "Give a man a mask and he will tell you the truth"- Oscar Wilde.

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